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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    improve their environmental performance Highlights of the report include a 44 reduction in waste sent to landfill and 15 increase in alternative fuel use in dolomite production The report can be found here ENDS Notes to Editors The BLA is a constituent body of the Mineral Products Association MPA which is the trade association for the aggregates asphalt cement concrete lime mortar and silica sand industries The BLA represents the

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/news/14_release004.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    to turn on the heating and have been splashed by a passing car hitting a rain filled pothole Here is how lime feeds in to all of those Cleaner Air Electricity consumption increases in winter and lime is used to treat air emissions from our power stations Warmer Buildings Lime is essential in the manufacture of glass in your double glazed windows and lime based mortars allow walls to insulate better by being drier and more air tight Lime is also a key ingredient in the manufacture of lightweight insulating concrete blocks known as aircrete that that can keep you warmer indoors Safer Roads Lime in asphalt improves resistance to potholing by enhancing the resilience and durability of the asphalt bond to the aggregate in road surfacing This makes our roads safer last longer and reduces maintenance costs too Hot Drinks Lime is used to treat tap water and make it safe for us to drink by removing impurities ENDS Notes to Editors The BLA is a constituent body of the Mineral Products Association MPA which is the trade association for the aggregates asphalt cement concrete lime mortar and silica sand industries The BLA represents the interests of three member

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/news/14_release003.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    sector Roadmap and the redesign of the EuLA website are all detailed in the document The report can be downloaded on the following page http www eula eu documents 2013 2014 activity report ENDS Notes to Editors The BLA is a constituent body of the Mineral Products Association MPA which is the trade association for the aggregates asphalt cement concrete lime mortar and silica sand industries The BLA represents the

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/news/14_release002.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    suitable to build upon It can transform disused areas into playgrounds sports fields or parks Making Summer Treats Lime is crucial to the sugar making process Sugar is a key ingredient in cold summer treats such as ice lollies and ice cream Providing Day Trips At many historical sites around the UK lime mortar was used in the original construction such as Roman forts Sites that have been recently restored

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/news/14_release001.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    and asphalt and speakers from WRAP URS and Nottingham University gave very interesting presentations A representative from the European Lime Association also attended and gave a valuable European perspective Feedback on the event has been very positive so far and the presentations from the day can be viewed here ENDS Notes to Editors The BLA is a constituent body of the Mineral Products Association MPA which is the trade association

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/news/13_release005.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    BRE green guide Sustainability In this section Introduction Sustainable development reports Recarbonation Biodiversity restoration MPA sustainability portal external site Education In this section Introduction The importance of lime How lime is made Lime cycle Lime resources Health safety Lime uses In this section Introduction Manufacturing Construction Environment Food water Technical In this section Introduction Asphalt Flue gas treatment Iron steel Lime in mortars Sewage sludge treatment Soil stabilisation Also relevant

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/sitemap.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    general terms this creates a more hospitable environment for aquatic organisms in particular fish Lime is therefore used by fish farmers to maintain a suitable habitat for breeding fish Flue gas treatments Lime being the most cost effective alkali is widely used in the removal of acidic gases emitted by power stations Lime based techniques for the abatement of acidic gases can be divided into 5 groups Wet scrubbing where gases are treated with milk lime to remove SO 2 Sulphur Dioxide and neutralisation products are removed as a suspension Semi dry scrubbing where milk of lime is sprayed onto the gases to remove SO 2 Sulphur Dioxide and reaction products are removed with a dust collector High temperature over 850 C dry injection of hydrated lime where the hydrated lime calcines and the resulting calcium oxides reacts with the acid gases SO 2 Reaction products are also removed using a dust collector Low temperature below 300 C dry injection of hydrated lime removes HC1 HF and SO 2 Similarly reaction products are removed using a dust collector Low temperature below 300 C absorption by hydrated lime in a fixed bed used to remove Hafnium from kilns calcining ceramic products DOWNLOAD LINK Grimsby Operations flue gas treatment 28 kb Fruit farming As apples and other fruit ripen they emit carbon dioxide When in storage the carbon dioxide lowers the level of oxygen in the atmosphere and accelerates the rate of deterioration of the fruit By circulating air around the fruit and over hydrated lime the level of carbon dioxide is reduced and the fruit remains fresh and useable for longer Residues from processing citrus are mixed with lime dried and sold as cattle feed Lime can also be used to neutralise waste citric acid and to raise the pH of fruit juices to stabilise the flavour and colour Glass manufacture Although limestone is generally more cost effective in the production of glass dolomitic and high calcium lime in finely ground forms can also be used under specific circumstances Burnt lime often provides greater transparency to the glass than limestone on account of Its lower content of organic matter The iron oxide being present in the ferrous rather than the ferric form Both of the benefits also reduce the requirement for costly decolouriser additives In glass processes using medium to fine grained materials the replacement of limestone by burnt lime has been reported to increase solution rates and reduce heat requirements therefore increasing the production capacity of a furnace A Z lime uses I P Incineration The continuing demand for power has resulted in an increase in the burning of fossil fuels Many such fuels contain sulphur and the resultant emissions into the atmosphere are the principal cause of acid rain Other sources of acid rain can be incinerators whether they burn municipal or industrial waste clinical waste animal carcasses or natural fuels Almost all incinerators around the world have utilised lime as a means of removing harmful gases for many years and proved lime to be cost effective efficient and sustainable Lime is sprayed into the flue gas stream in the form of a dry powder or as a suspension in water It then reacts with the pollutants to form an insoluble salt which is easy to dispose of In the case of desulphurisation it is possible to produce quality gypsum calcium sulphate which can be used as a raw material in plaster or plasterboard Iron and steel manufacture In many countries lime is used more for iron and steel making than for construction and building Most of the lime used is for fluxing impurities in the basic oxygen steelmaking BOS process Lime is also used in similar quantities in the following The sinter strand process for the preparation of iron ore In the desulfurisation of pig iron As a fluxing agent in other oxygen steelmaking process In the electric arc steelmaking process In many of the secondary steelmaking processes In fact the BOS process replaced the Bessemer and open hearth steelmaking processes during the 1960 s and caused some major changes in both the steel and lime industries The process is now used for 70 of the worlds steel production with the remainder being in electric arc furnaces EAF Please refer to the Technical section for more detailed information Leather tanning Hydrated lime helps to de hair and plump hides before the tanning process is completed Lime Concrete Lime concrete or limecrete is made by mixing controlled amounts of sand aggregate binder and water Portland Cement is normally used as the binder although nowadays hydraulic lime or hydrated lime plus a pozzolan can also be used Limewash Limewash is a traditional form of paint used for the internal decoration of buildings with solid walls but without damp proof courses The moisture content of such walls is frequently high and varies with the seasons meaning any wall decoration has to be porous Limewash is also widely used in agricultural buildings due to its mild germicidal qualities coupled with its ease of application and relatively low cost In addition it has also been recommended by the Building Research Establishment BRE for use on bituminous surfaces such as flat roofs to reduce radiant heat absorption from sunlight Mortar Similar to the production of concrete and plasters lime was the initial ingredient that was slowly replaced by Portland Cement that proved to be more beneficial due to its consistency and rapid development of strength These cement sand mortars however proved to be almost too strong for most purposes and the introduction of cement lime mixes were proposed in the late 1800 s This mix provided an even more efficient mix possessing both good soft properties as well as controlled strength The benefits of using lime and lime cement mortars can be divided into two categories soft and hard characteristics They are as follows Soft characteristics They have high workabilities Their water retentivities are very high making them particularly suitable for use with absorptive

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/education/the_importance_of_lime.php (2016-02-10)
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  • British Lime Association (BLA) part of the Mineral Products Association (MPA)
    BLA is one of the constituent bodies of the Mineral Products Association One of our key aims is to help broaden the public s knowledge of the benefits of high calcium lime and dolomitic lime as well as representing the interests of the industry in technical promotional environmental and general matters Lime was burnt as early as the 4th Century BC when it was first used as a building material Today the universal term lime includes quicklime hydrated lime milk of lime and dolomitic lime Lime is one of those usually unseen products that has a profound effect on our daily lives It is used in many important industrial processes such as steel manufacture the building construction industry in food production processes agriculture and many environmental applications to name just a few BLA members manufacture many different variations of the lime product based around simple chemical reactions It is this flexibility that allows the material to be used successfully in such a vast number of very different applications The British Lime Association BLA is one of the constituent bodies of the Mineral Products Association MPA Mineral Products Association Gillingham House 38 44 Gillingham Street London SW1V 1HU MultiMap Click here

    Original URL path: http://www.britishlime.org/about/the_bla.php (2016-02-10)
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