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  • Buddhist Connection | Community services network
    Chaplaincy Program Overview Hospital Chaplaincy Information for Hospitals Prison Chaplaincy Training For Chaplains Becoming a Chaplain On Going Support For Chaplains Other Spiritual Care Projects For Members Member Listing Member Benefits Member Service Accreditation Joining The Member Network Getting Involved Volunteer Positions Volunteer Application Form Become a Friend Update My Details About What We Do Videos Publications Annual Reports Newsletters Contact search NewsPage Search form Search Special Discussion Forum The Buddhist Council of NSW is hosting a special discussion forum on the topic of The Younger Generation We will facilitate discussion around issues that affect the younger generation Presentations will be given from key members of the new PAL Buddhist School the MITRA Buddhist Youth Network and our Buddhist Values and Life Skills SRE Program Questions to consider include Is technology taking too much attention from our youth Does the next generation know enough about the life skills taught by the Buddha Do young people get enough opportunity to learn about Buddhism Are there activities for youth that we could promote as a community The morality of the younger generation in an ever changing fast paced modern society is an important issue that affects us all Therefore we are opening up the event to anyone in the community to attend Let s come together to share our ideas for an engaged discussion We hope to come away with new insights and strategies on how to ensure the future generation is equipped with adequate values and life skills to lead a life in accordance with the Buddha Dharma We look forward to your attendance When 3pm Saturday 30 May 2015 Where Dharma Drum Mountain Buddhist Centre Unit 2 67 Jersey St Hornsby entry via Bridge St The centre is a short 5 minute walk from Hornsby Railway Station and street parking

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/ (2016-02-09)
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  • New to Buddhism | Buddhist Connection
    Support for Buddhist Scripture SRE Teachers Other Education Projects SRE Contact Form Humanitarian Care Assisting the Disadvantaged in Society Animal Protection Humanitarian Disaster Relief Spiritual Care Chaplaincy Program Overview Hospital Chaplaincy Information for Hospitals Prison Chaplaincy Training For Chaplains Becoming a Chaplain On Going Support For Chaplains Other Spiritual Care Projects For Members Member Listing Member Benefits Member Service Accreditation Joining The Member Network Getting Involved Volunteer Positions Volunteer Application Form Become a Friend Update My Details About What We Do Videos Publications Annual Reports Newsletters Contact search NewsPage Search form Search You are here Home New to Buddhism 22 April 2011 8 54pm admin1 Ask A Question About Buddhism Send us your questions and we will get back to you Brief History of Buddhism Learn about the progression of Buddhism through time Buddhist Teachings What did the Buddha teach Everyday Buddhism How do we integrate Buddhism into our everyday lives Buddhist Meditation Information about Buddhist meditation practices Practicing Meditation How to practice meditation effectively Buddhism in Australia An overview of Buddhism s place in Australia Buddhist Protocol In Brief What does one need to be aware of in Buddhist settings Further Investigating Buddhism Where to go to find out

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/3 (2016-02-09)
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  • Buddhist Teachings | Buddhist Connection
    Disaster Relief Spiritual Care Chaplaincy Program Overview Hospital Chaplaincy Information for Hospitals Prison Chaplaincy Training For Chaplains Becoming a Chaplain On Going Support For Chaplains Other Spiritual Care Projects For Members Member Listing Member Benefits Member Service Accreditation Joining The Member Network Getting Involved Volunteer Positions Volunteer Application Form Become a Friend Update My Details About What We Do Videos Publications Annual Reports Newsletters Contact search NewsPage Search form Search You are here Home New to Buddhism Buddhist Teachings 22 April 2011 10 29pm admin1 Buddhist Teachings Dharma Dhamma The basic concern shared by all beings humans animals and insects alike is a desire to be happy and to avoid suffering Essentially the Buddha recognised this and taught a more skilful approach to life which leads to more lasting happiness Buddhism points to the underlying causes of our day to day problems and teaches a graduated path to liberate us from suffering This is known as the Noble Eight Fold Path Buddhist teachings are therefore about reducing the causes of suffering and increasing the causes of happiness We normally see our problems as out there but Buddhism teaches that it s actually all about our perception of the world Seeing clearly where our difficulties originate is the first step to overcoming them The paradox is that most of us find ourselves unknowingly creating conditions that lead us back to the dissatisfaction we so desperately seek to eliminate What the Buddha taught cannot be absorbed by intellectual understanding alone it needs to be realised through direct experience How does meditation fit in The aim of Buddhist teachings is to develop the capacity to recognise that the ever changing inter connected universe follows the law of cause and effect In order to realise this not just intellectually but experientially it is necessary

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/12 (2016-02-09)
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  • Everyday Buddhism | Buddhist Connection
    while others may include prayers chanting reciting the Buddha s name taking refuge and bowing to the alter which normally holds a Buddha image The language used for chanting can be any one of many languages such as English Pali Sanskrit Chinese or Tibetan Daily practice typically lasts from 15 minutes to one hour Another daily practice common among Buddhists is renewing the five precepts which are moral undertakings to refrain from harmful or unskilful acts which are killing taking what is not given sexual misconduct harmful speech and taking intoxicants On the positive side Buddhists try to foster generosity compassion and loving kindness a wish for all beings to be well and happy Some Buddhists and those simply wishing to explore Buddhism may choose to go on a retreat This offers a defined period of quiet reflection and meditation lasting from days to weeks or even months A Buddhist pilgrimage involves making a special trip to holy places such as in India Nepal Tibet China or Sri Lanka Buddhist teachings can be explored and tested by anyone When one s faith and confidence in the Buddhist path develops a formal ceremony can be undertaken called taking refuge This essentially involves recognising the importance of the Triple Gem or Three Jewels namely the Buddha who discovered the path the Dharma the teachings and the Sangha the community of ordained monks and nuns who devote their lives to spiritual practice For most Buddhists ordained monks and nuns play the central role in the Buddhist community as teachers and spiritual leaders although some Buddhists prefer less ceremony and instead learn from lay teachers There are different schools within Buddhism such as Theravada Sri Lanka Thailand Cambodia Burma Mahayana China Korea Japan Vietnam and Vajrayana Tibet Nepal Bhutan Whilst all maintain the basic

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/13 (2016-02-09)
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  • Buddhist Meditation | Buddhist Connection
    Do Videos Publications Annual Reports Newsletters Contact search NewsPage Search form Search You are here Home New to Buddhism Buddhist Meditation 22 April 2011 10 30pm admin1 Buddhist Meditation Your mind is normally active generating a continuous flow of thoughts sensations and emotions Meditation practice recognises that this is how the mind functions It does not try to stop your thoughts but rather offers techniques for letting them go So how does meditation work We experience everything through our mind so by training or cultivating this mind we can change the quality of our experience Gradually meditation practice alters the structure of the brain and new neuronal pathways are created which improve whole brain functioning Meditation increases left prefrontal lobe activity which is associated with happiness compassion joy and curiosity It also tends to reduce neuronal gossip that is thoughts of anxiety fear and worry This is achieved by resting the mind in natural non judgemental awareness Buddhist meditation helps us to be aware of the so called mental poisons of attachment aversion and ignorance which lead to harm for ourselves as well as other beings Meditation can help us to become happier kinder more compassionate and more aware of the needs of other beings Over time meditation can even make us more aware of the consequences of our own actions or the actions of others and we may learn to uncover the illusion of self Gradually we may start to realise that there is no difference between the mind that thinks and the thoughts that flow in and out of it The difference between ordinary meditation and Buddhist meditation is Mindfulness What is this It is the link between sitting meditation practice and everyday life Mindfulness meditation improves our non judgemental awareness throughout the day so that we are

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/14 (2016-02-09)
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  • Practicing Meditation | Buddhist Connection
    Hospital Chaplaincy Information for Hospitals Prison Chaplaincy Training For Chaplains Becoming a Chaplain On Going Support For Chaplains Other Spiritual Care Projects For Members Member Listing Member Benefits Member Service Accreditation Joining The Member Network Getting Involved Volunteer Positions Volunteer Application Form Become a Friend Update My Details About What We Do Videos Publications Annual Reports Newsletters Contact search NewsPage Search form Search You are here Home New to Buddhism Practicing Meditation 22 April 2011 10 31pm admin1 Practicing Meditation How do I meditate Firstly let go of your expectations about meditation The Buddha taught many meditation techniques so there is no single best method Do not hold onto thoughts as they arise just let them go Rest the mind in the present moment allowing thoughts and sensations to pass noting them without attaching to them Meditation is not a competitive sport and it should not be forced it is a process of letting go of the thoughts feelings and emotions that flow through our minds In the early stages the quality and the frequency of meditation is more important than the quantity In other words it s better to have a few short but relaxed sessions of five or ten minutes than to force a 60 minute session each morning The object or focus of your meditation can be your breath a natural garden scene a sound or a wish for others to be well and happy You can even send compassionate thoughts towards someone you love Since distractions are inevitable while meditating distractions can even be used as objects of meditation e g a particular thought a sound or a physical sensation can be used to focus the mind with non judgemental awareness Particularly in the early stages it is helpful to take advice from a meditation teacher

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/15 (2016-02-09)
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  • Buddhism in Australia | Buddhist Connection
    is growing rapidly doubling between 1996 and 2006 Broadly speaking at least three quarters of Australia s Buddhists are what can be called Eastern Buddhists from Buddhist families originating from Asian countries who have migrated to Australia in recent decades The remaining quarter Western Buddhists are generally Australian born Caucasians and have probably grown up in either a Christian or humanistic family Australian Buddhism is a picture of ethnic and cultural diversity as well as diversity of practice Some traditional practices have survived centuries and some others have emerged recently due to the conditions of contemporary Australian society Let us summarise some of the challenges to Buddhism as it develops in Australia and indeed the West generally Diversity of Buddhist Practice To the newcomer the different types of Buddhist practices may look inconsistent Being a Buddhist can mean daily chanting and prayers regular visits to temples to make food offerings to monks and nuns the occasional meditation retreat or even participating in social or community activities Even Buddhists with years of practice may not be aware of the full extent of Buddhist teachings and practices Cultural and Language Barriers Some cultural norms are adapted into Buddhist practice because they support or underpin the more important rituals and values for example generosity and respect for monks and nuns While not being part of the core teachings rituals nevertheless can become part of Buddhist practice While cultural practices may be appropriate and reasonable when and where they originated some cultural practices may present an obstacle for those new to Buddhism for example bowing or chanting in an unfamiliar language Interfaith relationships There is much goodwill from other religions towards Buddhists This stems from the perception that Buddhists are generally peaceful and non threatening The challenge for Buddhists engaged in inter faith dialogues

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/16 (2016-02-09)
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  • Buddhist Protocol in Brief | Buddhist Connection
    For Chaplains Other Spiritual Care Projects For Members Member Listing Member Benefits Member Service Accreditation Joining The Member Network Getting Involved Volunteer Positions Volunteer Application Form Become a Friend Update My Details About What We Do Videos Publications Annual Reports Newsletters Contact search NewsPage Search form Search You are here Home New to Buddhism Buddhist Protocol in Brief 22 April 2011 10 32pm admin1 Buddhist Protocol in Brief 1 When greeting any robed ordained Buddhist monks or nuns of any tradition it is sufficient to give a half bow from the waist with palms together and a smile 2 Be aware that some Buddhist monks in Australia may not be fluent English speakers so be sensitive to other non verbal signals 3 Best for lay people to wear modest clothes rather than tight or revealing clothing 4 It is considered rude to point your feet at Buddha images or in the direction of any person 5 Religious books and artefacts should never be put on the floor nor should you step over any books people or food on the floor 6 A Monk is called Bhikkhu Pali or Bhiksu Sanskrit A Nun is called Bhikkhuni Pali Bhiksuni Sanskrit 7 The three main traditions are called Theravada Sri Lanka Burma Thailand Cambodia Indonesia Mahayana China Japan Korea Vietnam and Vajrayana Tibet Nepal Bhutan 8 Robes of ordained monastics can be yellow orange brown red maroon black grey novices who may be training for full ordination may be dressed in white 9 You can address all monks and nuns as Venerable although there are many titles within traditions like Ajarn Bhante Rinpoche Dharma Master Roshi Ayya Sunim and Ani 10 While some ordained monastics allow touching with lay people it is safer to not physically contact ordained monastics of the opposite sex

    Original URL path: http://buddhistcouncil.org/node/17 (2016-02-09)
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