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  • Water History
    and Permits General Service Application Hydrant Meter Dewatering New Construction Programs Sewer Lateral Leak Up To Owner Lead Service Replacement Currents Newsletter Hours of Operation Location Directions Proposals and Bids Departments Report a Problem Water Quality Report Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know If you hold a bucket underneath your showerhead for 20 seconds and more than a gallon of water accumulates you should install a low flow showerhead to save water Related Links Present Day Water Systems Water Sources About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Water System History Water History The City of Boston was founded in 1620 however evidence shows us that Native Americans inhabited the area as long ago as 2500BC Throughout its long and distinguished history Boston has played important roles in the development of our country and in the process created a high standard of living for its citizens And one not so small feat was the development of a water system that allowed its citizens to live a healthy prosperous and convenient life The following is a brief history of this system The Early Settlers Jamaica Pond Boston s early settlers relied on cisterns wells and a spring on Boston Common for their water However as the city grew this supply was inadequate and the quality often poor The first attempt to provide an alternative came from private suppliers who in 1796 began delivering water from Jamaica Pond through a system of wooden pipes But as the City grew in size as well as in population City planners began to look towards the western part of the state for a more abundant water supply 1848 1900 In 1848 the City obtained its first municipal water supply from Long Pond now called Lake Cochituate which is about 19 miles west of Boston The water traveled via the Cochituate Aqueduct into the Brookline Reservoir In 1848 Boston s population was about 127 000 and in the period 1860 to 1900 the population tripled to 550 000 In order to meet this growing need several construction projects were initiated Beginning in 1866 construction of several reservoirs and related aqueducts were completed to address the water needs of the City These additions however still did not meet the growing population s needs In response to this in 1895 the City formed the Metropolitan Water District MWD which was to identify additional water sources for the City 1900 1970 Looking still further west city planners located an area in central Massachusetts 35 miles west of Boston called Wachusett In 1908 the Wachusett Dam Reservoir and Aqueduct were completed In 1919 to oversee the complex water system and sewer system the Massachusetts Legislature created the Metropolitan District Commission MDC now the Department of Conservation and Recreation The MDC developed

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/water/Water_history.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Water Sources
    For Bid Request For Proposals Bidder s List MBE WBE Research Connection Repairs Account Reactivation Demolition New Construction Permitting Dewatering Permits Hydrant Meter Permits Stormwater Permits For Construction For Industrial Use Mark out Request Regulations April 30 2016 Location Directions Hours of Operation Departments Organization Water Sewer Systems Present Day Water Systems Present Day Sewer System Commissioners Awards Reports Employment Quick Links Customer Service Change of Ownership Your Account Lien Certificate FAQs Forms and Permits General Service Application Hydrant Meter Dewatering New Construction Programs Sewer Lateral Leak Up To Owner Lead Service Replacement Currents Newsletter Hours of Operation Location Directions Proposals and Bids Departments Report a Problem Water Quality Report Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know If you hold a bucket underneath your showerhead for 20 seconds and more than a gallon of water accumulates you should install a low flow showerhead to save water Related Links Water Distribution Map Water Sources Water History Awards About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Water System Water Sources Water Sources Quabbin Reservoir Boston s drinking water comes from two source reservoirs in central and western Massachusetts the Quabbin and the Wachusetts Reservoirs In addition to the reservoirs the system includes surface aqueducts covered storage tanks treatment facilities and deep rock tunnels This system is known as the Metropolitan Boston Water System The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority MWRA and the Department of Conservation and Recreation DCR jointly manage the Metropolitan Boston Water System The MWRA provides treatment and distribution of drinking water to 50 communities in the metropolitan area including Boston The DCR

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/water/sources.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Present Day Sewer System
    Organization Water Sewer Systems Present Day Water Systems Present Day Sewer System Commissioners Awards Reports Employment Quick Links Customer Service Change of Ownership Your Account Lien Certificate FAQs Forms and Permits General Service Application Hydrant Meter Dewatering New Construction Programs Sewer Lateral Leak Up To Owner Lead Service Replacement Currents Newsletter Hours of Operation Location Directions Proposals and Bids Departments Report a Problem Water Quality Report Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know The optimal depth in a birdbath is two and a half inches Related Links Sewer History Treatment Projects About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Sewer System Sewer System Boston Water and Sewer Commission BWSC owns and operates a system for the collection and transport of wastewater and storm drainage in the City of Boston The system serves approximately 20 500 acres 70 percent of the total land area of Boston The remaining 30 is comprised of parks cemeteries and undeveloped land The Sewer System The City is served by two types of wastewater collection systems separate and combined A separate sewer system is comprised of sanitary sewers and storm drains Sanitary sewers are designed to transport only sanitary flow which includes a certain amount of groundwater infiltration Storm drains are designed to transport stormwater flows A combined system performs the dual function of transporting sanitary flow as well as storm water runoff in one conduit identified as a combined sewer This type of system is common in older cities Approximately 80 percent of the sewered portion of the City roughly 16 500 acres is served by the separate sewers and 20 percent of the sewered portion of the City approximately 4 000 acres particularly the older sections of the city is served by combined sewers Currently BWSC has a program to replace combined sewers with sanitary sewers and storm drains The Infrastructure The spine of the sewer system consists of two major interceptors The New Boston Main Interceptor and the New East Side Interceptor Completed in 1988 these interceptors serve the sewer needs of downtown Boston the South End Roxbury Dorchester and South Boston They provide increased system capacity which reduces wet weather combined sewer overflow discharges and virtually eliminates dry weather discharge into Boston Harbor and its tributary waters Other collection facilities provide sewer services to the remainder of the City Sewer Lining By far the predominant element of the BWSC wastewater collection system is the sewers Totaling approximate 1 455 linear miles the sewer system consists of 622 miles of sanitary 595 miles of storm drain 235 miles of combined sewer and 3 miles of combined sewer overflow The sewers are made of stone brick vitrified clay concrete iron and cast iron Vitrified clay is the most prevalent type of sewer material in the system

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/sewer/PresentDay_sewer.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Sewer History
    Problem Water Quality Report Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know In 1848 Lake Cochituate in Natick was utilized as Boston s second surface water supply to meet the needs of the city s growing population Related Links Treatment Combined Sewer Systems Stormwater Management About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Sewer System History Sewer History Kimball St Dorchester Overflow 1896 Boston has been using sewers since before 1700 The first sewers were privately owned and served the purpose of draining water from cellars and low lying areas into nearby surface waters Problems arose due to the nuisance caused by constructing these sewers as well as disagreements over ownership rights In 1709 the Massachusetts General Court passed an Act regulating the construction of sewers The Act also provided the basis for distributing sewer costs and charging for their use Up to this point water entering this system was from flooded cellars yards and streets In 1833 however sanitary waste was allowed into the system The practice proliferated throughout the city and in just one year later the city encouraged adding rainwater from roofs to the system to assist in flushing the sewers of sanitary waste This flushing did not solve the problem and health issues related to water contamination such as cholera typhoid and dysentery began to increase among Bostonians In 1875 a study was initiated to address this problem which led to the construction of the Boston Main Drainage System 1875 1919 Moon Island Reservoirs The Boston Main Drainage System BMDS was the original backbone of Boston s early sewer system The BMDS was constructed from 1877 to 1884 under the direction of a special committee established by the City The purpose of the BMDS was to intercept local sewers and carry the sanitary waste and rainwater runoff to an offshore disposal point The system included 25 miles of intercepting sewers the Calf Pasture pumping station in Dorchester the Dorchester Bay Tunnel and an outfall pipe at Moon Island in Boston Harbor It should be noted that neither the pumping station nor the tunnel is now in use As Boston s population grew and its city limits expanded due to annexation and land reclamation the drainage works were subsequently enlarged to accommodate this growth Construction of Stony Brook Channels The BMDS disposed of a substantial portion of the City s waste however there were parts of Boston lying outside the service area To address this the Metropolitan Sewerage System was form in 1889 The first of its kind in the country the Metropolitan Sewerage District included the North Metropolitan Sewer District the Charles River Valley Sewer System and the South Metropolitan Sewer District 1919 1985 In 1919 to oversee the complex Metropolitan Sewerage District as well as the water system

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/sewer/Sewer_history.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Treatment
    out Request Regulations April 30 2016 Location Directions Hours of Operation Departments Organization Water Sewer Systems Present Day Water Systems Present Day Sewer System Commissioners Awards Reports Employment Quick Links Customer Service Change of Ownership Your Account Lien Certificate FAQs Forms and Permits General Service Application Hydrant Meter Dewatering New Construction Programs Sewer Lateral Leak Up To Owner Lead Service Replacement Currents Newsletter Hours of Operation Location Directions Proposals and Bids Departments Report a Problem Water Quality Report Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know You can help prevent street flooding by keeping catch basins clear of leaves trash and other debris Related Links Sewer History Combined Sewer Systems Stormwater Management Projects About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Sewer System Treatment Treatment Egg Digesters Deer Island All wastewater collected by the Boston Water and Sewer Commission s BWSC facilities is conveyed to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority s MWRA Deer Island Treatment Plant in Boston Harbor The MWRA sewer system maintains and operates a 240 mile network of large interceptor sewers for wastewater collection eleven pumping stations serving low lying areas five headworks where wastewater is pre treated five combined sewer overflow facilities and two wastewater treatment plants serving 43 communities including the City of Boston The wastewater influent arrives at Deer Island through four underground tunnels Here the wastewater is treated in two stages primary and secondary The primary stage includes removing grit for disposal in an off island landfill and routing the wastewater to primary treatment clarifiers where about half of the pollutants in the wastewater are removed

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/sewer/treatment.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Combined Sewer Systems and Outfall Maps
    Currents Newsletter Hours of Operation Location Directions Proposals and Bids Departments Report a Problem Water Quality Report Location Directions Hours of Operation Departments Organization Water Sewer Systems Present Day Water Systems Present Day Sewer System Commissioners Awards Reports Employment Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know Every time you flush the toilet you use 5 7 gallons of water Related Links Sewer History Treatment Stormwater Management Projects About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Sewer Systems CSO Maps Combined Sewer Systems Outfall Maps CSO Outfalls with Tide Gates at Fort Point Channel The City of Boston is served by two types of wastewater collection systems separate and combined A separate sewer system is comprised of sanitary sewers and storm drains Sanitary sewers are designed to transport only sanitary flow and storm drains are designed to transport stormwater flows However a combined system performs the dual function of transporting sanitary flow as well as storm water runoff in one pipe identified as a combined sewer overflow CSO This type of system is common in older cities During a storm event the combined sewer can reach capacity and when this happens it discharges its flow which consists of both sanitary and rain water into receiving waters Currently Boston has approximately 235 miles of combined sewers and 37 active CSO outfalls These CSO outfalls are necessary to provide relief only when capacity has been reached Without this relief the combined sewage and stormwater would back up into homes and businesses Generally overflows do not occur and all wastewater is conveyed to the Massachusetts Water

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/outfall_maps/outfall_maps.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Stormwater Management
    Construction Permitting Dewatering Permits Hydrant Meter Permits Stormwater Permits For Construction For Industrial Use Mark out Request Regulations April 30 2016 Location Directions Hours of Operation Departments Organization Water Sewer Systems Present Day Water Systems Present Day Sewer System Commissioners Awards Reports Employment Quick Links Customer Service Change of Ownership Your Account Lien Certificate FAQs Forms and Permits General Service Application Hydrant Meter Dewatering New Construction Programs Sewer Lateral Leak Up To Owner Lead Service Replacement Currents Newsletter Hours of Operation Location Directions Proposals and Bids Departments Report a Problem Water Quality Report Location Directions Hours of Operation Departments Organization Water Sewer Systems Present Day Water Systems Present Day Sewer System Commissioners Awards Reports Employment Customer Login Account Number Access Number Need help logging in Public Notices Water Main Flushing Notice Beacon Hill Project Update Customer Safety Alert Bill Information Customer Rights BWSC RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Request FREE Grease Can Lid Sewer Lateral Bonded Contractor List Bonded Contractors Full List Did You Know Brushing your teeth can use up to 2 gallons of water Related Links Projects About BWSC Water Sewer Systems Sewer Systems Stormwater Management Stormwater Management Stormwater Outfall at Metropolitan Ave Hyde Park The stormwater system is a separate system that collects water from storm water runoff rain and snow melt and discharges it into receiving waters around Boston Boston Water and Sewer Commission BWSC controls most of the this system however some storm drains and outfalls are privately owned or are owned by agencies such as the Massachusetts Highway Department the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority Massport and the Department of Conservation and Recreation BWSC s storm drainage system consists of approximately 424 miles of storm drain 201 storm drain outfalls and 31 752 catch basins Approximately 57 percent of Boston is served by separate storm drains The remainder

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/systems/stormwater_mgt/stormwater_mgmt.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • Commissioners
    confirmation by the City Council will oversee BWSC s activities The Board s primary responsibility is to ensure the sound economical and efficient maintenance of the water and sewer systems for the citizens of Boston The Executive Director of BWSC convenes a Commissioners meeting once a month to report on the status of the BWSC The Act also provides that Board members be appointed to serve four year staggered terms and must maintain residency with the City Any Board member may be reappointed any Board member may be removed by the Mayor for cause at any time subject to a public hearing procedure At least one Board member must have extensive experience in finance and accounting Board members are not compensated for their services but are reimbursed for expenses necessarily incurred in the performance of their duties If the Mayor does not fill a vacancy on the Board within 90 days or in the case of an unexpired term within 60 days the Act provides that such vacancy may be filled by majority vote of the City Council To read a biography of a Commissioner or the Executive Director click on a name below Michael J Woodall Michael J Woodall Chair Michael J Woodall was appointed Chairman of the Board on February 24 2015 Mr Woodall is the Head of Mutual Fund Shareholder Services at Putnam Investments His extensive leadership has earned Putnam numerous finance and customer service awards including the Dalbar Service Award for Call Center Excellence Dalbar Total Client Experience Award only fund firm to win National Quality Review 5 Star rating for processing accuracy and timeliness Money Management Executive NOVA Award for Innovation in back office efficiency Mr Woodall is a recognized Financial Services Industry leader with over 30 years of experience building re engineering and running profitable businesses He has extensive involvement in all aspects of the business partnering with clients the CEO and all divisions to deliver award winning products and services Mr Woodall has significant leadership experience which includes working with the Putnam Funds Board of Directors Chairing the Board of Directors for NICSA an active member of the NYSE Euronext Mutual Fund Proxy Fee Review Committee ICI Operations Committee DTCC Wealth Management Services Senior Advisory Board Putnam Fiduciary Trust Company Board of Directors and the Board of Visitors at Northeastern University D Amore McKim School of Business Mr Woodall is a graduate of Northeastern University with distinction as a member of the Sigma Epsilon Rho Honor Society His awards include receiving the Boston based PINCH Foundation Jack Leary Quiet Leadership Award and the Putnam Investments Board of Trustees Outstanding Service Award Mr Woodall is a Founding Board member of Inspire Arts and Music an organization dedicated to enriching the area s youth with leadership and performing arts programs including the Boston Crusaders Drum Bugle Corps Cathleen Douglas Stone Cathleen Douglas Stone Commissioner Cathleen Douglas Stone was appointed a member of the Board in August 1994 and most recently reappointed in 2010 In 1994

    Original URL path: http://www.bwsc.org/ABOUT_BWSC/commissioners.asp (2016-05-01)
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