archive-org.com » ORG » C » CAMN.ORG

Total: 153

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • CAMN on Twitter: Supporting the Colorado River Alliance | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    Fire Class Graduation Resources Links and Documents Volunteer Opportunities What Counts Board Meeting Minutes Texas Master Naturalist Program Volunteer Guidelines Calendar Log In Search for Board of Directors Partners CAMN on Twitter Supporting the Colorado River Alliance March 4 2016 President CapAreaMN made a financial contribution to one of our great partners TXColoradoRiver txmn txmasternaturalist donate River CAMN CapAreaMN March 4 2016 Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading Related Post navigation Previous Post Fire in Central Texas Next Post Footsteps Through Time Central Texas volunteers devoted to ecological stewardship education and outreach Connect Blog Facebook Twitter Flickr View capitalareamasternaturalists s profile on Facebook View CapAreaMN s profile on Twitter Upcoming Events May 5 Thu 2016 6 45 pm CAMN Board Meeting CAMN Board Meeting May 5 6 45 pm 8 45 pm May 25 Wed 2016 6 30 pm May Monthly Meeting Keeping th Austin Nature and Science Center May Monthly Meeting Keeping th Austin Nature and Science Center May 25 6 30 pm 8 00 pm Come hear Sharlene Leurig Project Director Texas Environmental Flows Sharlene works with the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment The Nature Conservancy National Wildlife Federation Ducks Unlimited and the

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/2016/03/04/camn-on-twitter-supporting-the-colorado-river-alliance/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • President | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    to apply this particular year please check back in August 2016 for the 2017 class Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading Partners CAMN and Diversity August 25 2015 President A couple weeks ago I attended a lunchtime seminar hosted by the Hill Country Conservancy as part of a new series of talks aimed at promoting diversity in the ecological services The Shades of Green learning series hosts panelists working toward diversity and inclusion in non profits and educational settings The panelists included Huston Tillotson University s Director of Community and Public Health Initiatives an organizer from the Sierra Club fighting environmental injustice perpetrated on historically poor communities and an attorney whose firm works to help non profits form In addition to highlighting their personal backgrounds they outlined the main challenges their organizations face in reaching different underserved communities and how their ideals for engagement have changed and grown Afterward the panelists took questions from the audience Moderator David Buggs Director of Diversity and Inclusion Texas Parks Wildlife Department I have always felt CAMN includes a good mix of all ages ranging from college students to retirees and a very balanced gender mix I stress this is simply my feeling based on casual observation however We do not keep any records of member demographics to back up my feeling Our success at least for these measures is probably largely haphazard a reflection of Austin s higher education population activist tendencies and relative wealth To my knowledge we ve never sought or promoted any particular policies to sway the mix of our membership one way or another In fact for most of our history we ve been somewhat blind to any such demographic factors with our largely first come first serve application that doesn t ask any questions that might be used in specific inclusionary OR exclusionary ways I think a core genetic building block of our brand of citizen science is often a belief in the decency of humankind and that decency at least in outward practice has no need to exclude anyone with a passion for their natural surroundings regardless of where they come from That said we are practically a racial monoculture To be sure we are not by any means unique in this regard among volunteer driven environmentally concerned non profits in Austin Many volunteer coordinators and outreach people I ve talked to have at one point noted the racial monoculture in their membership pool Many have expressed concern but have never found solutions to the predicament of how to include more people of color in their membership When I became president of CAMN I listed increasing our racial diversity and our reach to underserved communities as a goal I promptly failed to do much to reach it however I didn t know where to start what tools to employ or even who to talk to outside my typical middle class white circles As someone at the talk remarked it s incredibly difficult even to start conversations that revolve around race let alone dive into how to solve the considerable issues Furthermore it s difficult to break out of our usual zones of comfort our typical circles of friends colleagues and associates to even find ways to connect and include new people And minority members of our community may perceive different subtly hostile elements of interpersonal dynamics when they visit organizations outside their typical circles What one group may find as perfectly acceptable another may find unwelcoming And if they feel unwelcome they re likely not to engage or return The reasons the environmental movement is so racially fractured are numerous and varied I ll get into that in a moment with some help from the notes of one of the other attendees But solving some of these issues I believe is core to the survival of organizations like CAMN and more universally broadly accepted protection of the environment as a movement All communities need environmental protection in one form or another but so many of those protections come in efforts to safeguard pristine and sometimes remote tracts of land that are geographically disconnected from many urban underserved communities Putting myself in the shoes of a far east side resident it would be hard for me to care about efforts to protect the preserves that surround the wealth of Steiner Ranch for example Efforts to protect those spaces often ignore urban creeks parks green spaces community gardens etc places people of color might find connection themselves And when a demographic loses connection to natural environments it has no immediate incentive to learn about them restore them to protect them To speak up and vote for them Before long we find ourselves with gutted state and national policy related to clean air water endangered species or parks What can we do about it I m going to let the notes of Mikael Behrens birder and volunteer extraordinaire and applicant to the 2016 class speak to this He was the one who alerted me to the seminar and did a great job at capturing the main themes of the conversation He I and several other CAMN members attended Panel David Buggs Director of Diversity and Inclusion Texas Parks Wildlife Department Dominique Bowmen Huston Tillotson university Has environmental studies major Has Green is new Black student organization Marisa Perales law firm partner focusing on environmental issues Also helps people form non profits It s a for profit law firm though they don t do much environmental justice work or work with many people of color Dave Cortez Sierra Club Sierra Club was originally only white males Decolonization Beyond Coal campaign Themes People of color POC need their needs met by environmentalists And environmentalists need to learn what those needs are Ex access to parks via having local parks or having parks accessible via public transportation Out of necessity POC are often more concerned with environmental justice issues than conservation Dave has used reducing utility bills to interface with

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/author/admin/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Fire in Central Texas | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    of new Spanish oak trees versus the new Ashe juniper Oaks have many predators squirrel disease age deer They are short lived trees But juniper only has one predator fire If left alone the refuge would keep losing oaks and gaining junipers until the habitat was unfit for warblers he said Before fire was used for clearing areas of the forest mechanical methods were used chainsaws and heavy equipment Schwope said the mechanically cleared gap in the canopy would fill with Ashe juniper high density small diameter juniper trees Using fire on the refuge helps promote the Spanish oaks He said that when fire creates gaps in the forest canopy oaks fill in the area The fire knocks out the juniper berries and the juniper seedlings he said Fire gives a boost to oaks because they are sprouting and they have rootstock Habitat management for the warblers in the refuge involves burning only the understory to raise the crown base Schwope said For warblers the habitat needs some fire but not too much When the refuge crew conducts a prescribed burn conditions must be perfect to have the fire burn slowly along the ground without jumping to the mature forest canopy We know that high severity fire hurts the habitat Schwope said He told of a 1996 high severity fire at Fort Hood that burned 10 000 acres of warbler habitat The area burned again in 2011 Due to the slow recovery of Ashe juniper it will be decades before this area will be suitable habitat for the warbler So if it is fire that will help these habitats it won t be high severity fire Once high severity fires get started they are hard to put out During burns in warbler lands stopping a fire s transition from ground to the canopy is based on two main things how hot the fire is burning and how close to the ground the canopy is canopy base height If the canopy base height is 5 feet or more then a fire is less likely to become a crown fire and destroy warbler habitat and people s homes It is difficult to introduce a prescribed fire to an area for the first time If there has not been fire in an area for many years the fuel loads are tremendous Once an area has fire carefully introduced however subsequent managed fires are more easily implemented During some burns there might be a flare up or a tree might fall across the fire line Schwope and his crews are there waiting to put these out Before a prescribed fire is given a green light the fire manager takes into account the fuel load moisture wind temperature and innumerable other factors Schwope s influence is felt in other areas of Austin as one of his former crew members Luke Ball is in charge of fire management at Austin Water Utility Wildland Conservation Division Ball manages the land owned by the City of Austin This

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/2016/02/27/fire-in-central-texas/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Stuart | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    than any other practice Prescribed burning is also considered the cheapest most effective habitat management technique TPWD website Wildfires were once essential to Texas Grasses and understory plants used to burn at intervals of two to five years Those fires not only determined the mix of flora and fauna that made up the ecosystem they also regenerated the land When humans with property houses and ranches arrived humans began to suppress any fire that came upon the landscape They protected their property Now a group of Central Texas specialists are bringing fire back Depending on their mission they seek to sustain habitat for endangered animals and or enhance water s infiltration of the aquifer While catastrophic fires cause untold damage to life and property carefully controlled burns help keep wildfire fuel in check Different types of prescribed burns are used in Central Texas depending on what the fire managers want to accomplish Some of these missions and lands present unique challenges to the fire starters I recently spoke with Carl Schwope the Fire Management Officer at Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge Located west of Austin the refuge s primary purpose is to protect the nesting habitat of two endangered migratory birds the golden cheeked warbler and black capped vireo These birds have two different habitats Keeping the birds happy with their area of the forest is Schwope s job Continue reading Fire in Central Texas Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading Central Texas volunteers devoted to ecological stewardship education and outreach Connect Blog Facebook Twitter Flickr View capitalareamasternaturalists s profile on Facebook View CapAreaMN s profile on Twitter Upcoming Events May 5 Thu 2016 6 45 pm CAMN Board Meeting CAMN Board Meeting May 5 6 45 pm 8 45 pm Share this FacebookTwitterEmailLike this Like Loading

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/author/stubugme-com/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bull Creek Preserve Permit Hike | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    Donnell guided a group on a Bull Creek Preserve permit hike He told us about the history of the preserve and ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance this important habitat for the endangered Golden Cheeked Warbler and Black Capped Vireo explaining the process of capturing and banding birds to monitor their success and dispersal He talked about bird mammal and invertebrate species that have been observed in the preserve and pointed out many native plant species telling stories of their historical uses He also identified invasive non native species describing the Sisyphean efforts to keep them under control He showed us the upturned soil where feral hogs had been rooting Noting the damage that has been done when people create adventitious trails that exacerbate the erosion problem Jim observed that although it looks rugged this land is really quite fragile To learn more about Bull Creek Preserve and the entry permit visit the Bull Creek Eco Web Nolina texana or beargrass basket grass but not a grass Island and waterfall Stump of a 300 year old cedar tree Jim s toolkit for bird banding Pink anemone Another view of the creek and 360 Nolina lindheimeriana also known as Devil s Shoestring Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading Related austin water bcp biologist endangered species hike permit wildland conservation division Post navigation Previous Post At the Vireo Preserve Next Post Fire in Central Texas Central Texas volunteers devoted to ecological stewardship education and outreach Connect Blog Facebook Twitter Flickr View capitalareamasternaturalists s profile on Facebook View CapAreaMN s profile on Twitter Upcoming Events May 5 Thu 2016 6 45 pm CAMN Board Meeting CAMN Board Meeting May 5 6 45 pm 8 45 pm May 25 Wed 2016 6 30 pm May Monthly Meeting Keeping th Austin Nature

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/2016/02/26/bull-creek-preserve-permit-hike/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Field Trips | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    the upturned soil where feral hogs had been rooting Noting the damage that has been done when people create adventitious trails that exacerbate the erosion problem Jim observed that although it looks rugged this land is really quite fragile To learn more about Bull Creek Preserve and the entry permit visit the Bull Creek Eco Web Another view of the creek and 360 Jim s toolkit for bird banding Nolina texana or beargrass basket grass but not a grass Pink anemone Stump of a 300 year old cedar tree Island and waterfall Nolina lindheimeriana also known as Devil s Shoestring Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading austin water bcp biologist endangered species hike permit wildland conservation division Class of 2016 Field Trips Training Uncategorized A day of weather climate and water birds at Hornsby Bend December 11 2015 President The 2016 Trainees completed their second class recently It was held at Hornsby Bend s Center for Environmental Research a department of Austin Water Utility Dr Kevin Anderson director of the CER lectured on the history of ecology in the U S and Texas Jon W Zeitler Science and Operations Officer National Weather Service Austin San Antonio spoke on the complex topic of what defines weather and climate while Dr Ruth Buskirk University of Texas at Austin introduced the trainees to taxonomy After lunch Dr Anderson gave the group a tour of the biosolids composting facilities and led a hike through a small part of the 1 200 acres of riparian forest habitat at Hornsby The walk highlights the bird blind built to facilitate watching the spectacular diversity of migrating waterfowl At another stop he discusses the progression some of the land made from being accidentally bulldozed for a parking lot to becoming the mid successional forest that is present today Jon W Zeitler National Weather Service Jon W Zeitler National Weather Service pointing out cloud formations Diane perusing some of Dr Anderson s library Travis photographing lady beetles Dr Kevin Anderson CER tour of biosolids composting facility Dr Anderson showcases the bird blind and birding at Hornsby Bend Black bellied whistling ducks Dr Anderson leads trainees on hike through early successional forest at Hornsby Bend Dr Anderson leads trainees on hike through early successional forest at Hornsby Bend Explaining forest succession On the banks of the Colorado River Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading Advanced Training Field Notes Field Trips Training Canyon Lake Gorge Advanced Training Trip Recap Gallery February 2 2015 President Eighteen CAMN ers and enthusiastic friends and family members had a successful Advanced Training trip to the Canyon Lake Gorge Saturday 1 24 We were hosted by the Gorge Preservation Society Great hike and lecture on the canyon and its geology Thanks to Jaynellen Ladd at the Society for helping set this up And a special shout out to our excellent volunteer docents Pete Bryant Cathy Downs Gracie Waggener Photos and text by Mark Wilson CAMN Field Trips Co coordinator Photo

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/category/field-trips/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • austin water | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    10 00 to 1 00 Jim O Donnell guided a group on a Bull Creek Preserve permit hike He told us about the history of the preserve and ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance this important habitat for the endangered Golden Cheeked Warbler and Black Capped Vireo explaining the process of capturing and banding birds to monitor their success and dispersal He talked about bird mammal and invertebrate species that have been observed in the preserve and pointed out many native plant species telling stories of their historical uses He also identified invasive non native species describing the Sisyphean efforts to keep them under control He showed us the upturned soil where feral hogs had been rooting Noting the damage that has been done when people create adventitious trails that exacerbate the erosion problem Jim observed that although it looks rugged this land is really quite fragile To learn more about Bull Creek Preserve and the entry permit visit the Bull Creek Eco Web Jim s toolkit for bird banding Pink anemone Nolina texana or beargrass basket grass but not a grass Stump of a 300 year old cedar tree Island and waterfall Another view of the creek and 360 Nolina lindheimeriana also known as Devil s Shoestring Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading austin water bcp biologist endangered species hike permit wildland conservation division Central Texas volunteers devoted to ecological stewardship education and outreach Connect Blog Facebook Twitter Flickr View capitalareamasternaturalists s profile on Facebook View CapAreaMN s profile on Twitter Upcoming Events May 5 Thu 2016 6 45 pm CAMN Board Meeting CAMN Board Meeting May 5 6 45 pm 8 45 pm Share this FacebookTwitterEmailLike this Like Loading May 25 Wed 2016 6 30 pm May Monthly Meeting Keeping th Austin Nature and Science

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/tag/austin-water/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • biologist | Capital Area Master Naturalists
    00 to 1 00 Jim O Donnell guided a group on a Bull Creek Preserve permit hike He told us about the history of the preserve and ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance this important habitat for the endangered Golden Cheeked Warbler and Black Capped Vireo explaining the process of capturing and banding birds to monitor their success and dispersal He talked about bird mammal and invertebrate species that have been observed in the preserve and pointed out many native plant species telling stories of their historical uses He also identified invasive non native species describing the Sisyphean efforts to keep them under control He showed us the upturned soil where feral hogs had been rooting Noting the damage that has been done when people create adventitious trails that exacerbate the erosion problem Jim observed that although it looks rugged this land is really quite fragile To learn more about Bull Creek Preserve and the entry permit visit the Bull Creek Eco Web Nolina lindheimeriana also known as Devil s Shoestring Stump of a 300 year old cedar tree Pink anemone Another view of the creek and 360 Island and waterfall Jim s toolkit for bird banding Nolina texana or beargrass basket grass but not a grass Share this Facebook Twitter Email Like this Like Loading austin water bcp biologist endangered species hike permit wildland conservation division Central Texas volunteers devoted to ecological stewardship education and outreach Connect Blog Facebook Twitter Flickr View capitalareamasternaturalists s profile on Facebook View CapAreaMN s profile on Twitter Upcoming Events May 5 Thu 2016 6 45 pm CAMN Board Meeting CAMN Board Meeting May 5 6 45 pm 8 45 pm Share this FacebookTwitterEmailLike this Like Loading May 25 Wed 2016 6 30 pm May Monthly Meeting Keeping th Austin Nature and Science Center

    Original URL path: http://camn.org/tag/biologist/ (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive



  •