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  • Animal research is helping us beat cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    leukaemia and lymphoma with impressive results This story is repeated time and time again with other advances in cancer research Animal studies showed the benefits of radiotherapy in the early days of cancer research and surgical techniques such as keyhole surgery were first tested in animals Even prevention strategies such as the cervical cancer vaccine have relied on animal research and studies in animals continue to be vital in bringing benefits to cancer patients and saving lives around the world To give just one demonstration of the importance of animal research survival from childhood cancer has rocketed from just a quarter of children surviving the disease in the late 1960s to more than eight in ten surviving today This amazing progress is a direct result of treatments developed through studies in animals A better future thanks to animal research These are only a few examples of the countless benefits animal research has brought to people with cancer but there are thousands of other drugs and treatment techniques that are built on knowledge from tests in animals And it s not just cancer patients that benefit from animal research As the Royal Society s position statement on the use of animals in research points out virtually every medical achievement in the past century has depended directly or indirectly on research on animals At Cancer Research UK animal research is never undertaken lightly and we seek to use alternatives wherever it s possible But this fact remains millions of people all over the world are alive today thanks to animal research Much of this knowledge has also been used to tackle diseases that affect animals themselves including cancer Many people working for and supporting us know first hand how devastating cancer can be and all of us are deeply committed to beating the disease Animal research is a necessary means to an end helping people with cancer to survive Dr David Scott Director of Science Funding You can find out more about animal research on the Understanding Animal Research website Updated May 2014 References Chinwalla A et al 2002 Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome Nature 420 6915 520 562 DOI 10 1038 nature01262 KÖHLER G MILSTEIN C 1975 Continuous cultures of fused cells secreting antibody of predefined specificity Nature 256 5517 495 497 DOI 10 1038 256495a0 Gambacorti Passerini C et al 2011 Multicenter independent assessment of outcomes in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib Journal of the National Cancer Institute 103 7 553 61 PMID 21422402 Druker B et al 1996 Effects of a selective inhibitor of the Abl tyrosine kinase on the growth of Bcr Abl positive cells Nature Medicine 2 5 561 566 DOI 10 1038 nm0596 561 Kerbl DC McDougall EM Clayman RV Mucksavage P 2011 A history and evolution of laparoscopic nephrectomy perspectives from the past and future directions in the surgical management of renal tumors The Journal of urology 185 3 1150 4 PMID 21255799 Share this article More on this topic Tags Animal research Research and trials Comments Click here to cancel reply Louise November 26 2011 http www animalaid org uk h n CAMPAIGNS experiments ALL 730 Just to pick out a few points It says that because animals that were forced to inhale tobacco smoke didn t develop lung cancer vital health warnings about the harmful effects of smoking were delayed by many years Vioxx an arthritis drug was withdrawn after 140 000 heart attacks and strokes were reported by its users it was tested on animals and the effects weren t evident from these tests The elephant man drug that left 6 men with organ failure after the effects weren t found during tests on monkeys So it s not just harmful to animals it s harmful to humans as well therefore animal testing is a blatant waste of time Linda Wallace October 29 2011 Strongly disagree on using animals for testing even though my Dad died from Bowel Cancer then it spread to Stomach Intestines etc even though his 2 brothers my Uncles have prostrate cancer my sis in law Liz is recovering from Breast Cancer Grade 3 there must r other ways of testing I will put my name forward now for testing on me NO DEFENSLESS ANIMAL OR PERSON SHOULD BE USED IN TESTING THERE ARE PLENTY OF PEOPLE WHO WOULD VOLUNTEER D Royd October 27 2011 Testing on animals is immoral If you want to justify it to yourself I understand but that doesn t make the act moral George Griffin August 20 2011 All I can say to D Collins is when you have watched someone you love deeply and who has been part of your life for almost 40 years slowly die with cancer then I will be willing to entertain their views Until that day he she clearly does not know what they are talking about I challenge him her not to have an emotional reaction under such circumstances D Collins August 20 2011 Why is the survival of even one human more important than causing pain suffering and enforcing unnatural living conditions on many other creatures These creatures do not volunteer and are completely defenceless I can understand how people with cancer or who have lost relatives through cancer have an emotional reaction to such issues I also understand that there are companies profiting from animal research But logically humans have no more right to survive than any other species I don t understand how anyone can think that creating death and disease deliberately for whatever reason is not unethical If as stated in the article above mice are very similar to humans surely they will suffer in the same way as a human Leanne July 6 2011 Everything I have read so far is a very good example of human ignorance to think for one minute that testing chemicals on a living creature that can feel pain may be carried out in a humane way is stupid if

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2011/06/21/animal-research-is-helping-us-beat-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Biotherapeutics – a new funding scheme for research - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    in the early 1970s to half of all cancer patients surviving today And it is our ambition that three in four cancer patients will survive in 20 years time To do that we need even more advanced cancer treatments while continuing to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of the ones we already have And that s why we re investing substantially in the emerging field of biotherapeutics smarter cancer treatments based on cells and biological molecules Today we announced a new funding scheme our Biotherapeutics Programmes awards which aims to spark research into these potentially powerful approaches Successful applicants could receive up to 2 5 million for as much as five years of research into developing new biotherapeutics So what are biotherapeutics and how can they bring us closer to the day when all cancers are cured Home grown The term biotherapeutics refers to any type of treatment that is produced by or involves living cells That is instead of drugs made from chemicals synthesised in the lab these are therapies that are based on biological processes in cells which we can engineer to help fight cancer These include Therapeutic Antibodies Cell based therapies Viral therapies Vaccines Protein therapies Gene therapies The key to these treatments is precision They can either home in on a very specific target in cancer cells or manipulate the immune system into destroying cancer For example antibodies are able to identify incredibly specific differences between healthy cells and cancer cells This ability combined with the fact that these treatments can be trained to hit targets of our choosing is what gives biotherapeutics the potential to be the smart missiles of cancer treatments The more we learn about which components of cancer cells make the best targets for treatment the more refined we can be in making selective biological therapies For example you may have already heard about the new antibody treatment pembrolizumab Keytruda which was recently given approval by the US Food and Drugs Administration FDA for treating melanoma As we ve written about before pembrolizumab is just the first in a range of antibody treatments that target specific molecules known as PD 1 and PDL 1 helping the patient s own immune system to eradicate cancer cells So far the results from clinical trials are looking good and these treatments hold real promise for cancer patients Antibodies can also be deployed in other ways For example once an antibody has been created it can be used to paint a target on cancer cells highlighting it to the immune system to clean up Alternatively it can be directly attached to another form of treatment such as radiotherapy or a toxic chemical acting as a delivery system for a deadly payload There are also promising approaches being made with vaccines Rather than preventing the development of the disease these treatments educate the immune system to recognise cancer cells as a threat and destroy them It is exactly these types of new approaches to treatment that we

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/10/21/biotherapeutics-a-new-funding-scheme-for-research/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Engineering a cancer-fighting immune super soldier - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    And for inspiration they ve turned to a completely different type of immune cell known as a B cell Modified warhead While T cells receptors can struggle to identify cancer cells B cells are able to release a completely different type of weapon antibodies These immune cell warheads are able to see through cancer s disguises And for many years researchers have known how to engineer antibodies to stick to particular molecules found on cancer cells a process that works entirely independently of the MHC display system T cells use to spot and target problems In the clinic these engineered antibodies are already being used to treat a number of different types of cancer The problem is that while antibodies can stick to cancer cells they don t have the killing power of T cells So what if the two weapons were combined What if T cells could be armed with antibodies detection capabilities That s the goal of engineered T cells Engineering a super T cell The fundamental idea behind engineered T cells is the creation of a hybrid molecule stuck to the T cells surface combining the cancer homing power of antibodies with the deadly killing abilities of an army of T cell clones And now after more than three decades of testing researchers are closing on exactly that Chimaeric Antigen Receptor T cells or CAR T cells These immune super soldiers are made using healthy T cells taken from a patient s blood They are given the genetic instructions to make cancer seeking antibodies in addition to their normal T cell receptor and are forced to replicate to form an entire upgraded army They are then injected back into the body to seek out cancer cells When these upgraded T cells encounter cancer cells they use their carefully designed hybrid warheads instead of the standard T cell receptor bypassing the cancer s defences and destroying the tumour cells But does this approach actually work Putting it into practice Researchers really got excited about CAR T cells back in 2011 when Professor Carl June and his team at Pennsylvania State University published the results of a small trial on three patients with lymphoma Their modified immune soldiers were working All three patients responded to the treatment two entered remission and the CAR T cells were estimated to have killed 1 000 cancer cells each A really promising result But this was only a very small study and there are still huge technical challenges to overcome The immune system is a powerful weapon and CAR T cells are still in the very early stages of development They need to be tweaked and modified to ensure that they don t cause too much collateral damage Targeting is a critical part of the design process for an immune super soldier Once their weapons are armed T cells will hunt their enemies relentlessly so choosing the right molecular target is vital Most of the research so far has focused on blood cancers

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2016/01/19/engineering-a-cancer-fighting-immune-super-soldier/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Cancer genes - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Cancer genes Topic Cancer genes CRISPR gene editing new chapter in cancer research or blot in the ethical copybook Category Science blog February 1 2016 Nick Peel We explore a new revolutionary gene editing technology called CRISPR that s taking labs by storm as scientists look to understand the genetics behind cancer Read More Grand Challenge six target cancer s super controller Category Science blog January 25 2016 Kat Arney This entry is part 7 of 8 in the series Grand Challenge The sixth of our Grand Challenge topics is posing the question can we target the cancer super controller MYC Read More Decoding cancer s secret diary Category Science blog January 18 2016 Cancer Research UK Cancer Research UK s Dr Trevor Graham and Dr Andrea Sottoriva discuss their work on the mathematics of how tumours grow and its implications for treatment Read More Grand Challenge three prevent cancer by studying scars in its DNA Category Science blog January 5 2016 Henry Scowcroft This entry is part 4 of 8 in the series Grand Challenge The third of our Grand Challenge topics asks can we prevent cancer by studying scars in its DNA Read More The 0 01 per cent can over the counter genetic tests help you be healthier Category Science blog December 2 2015 Misha Gajewski Is the future written in your genes We investigate whether over the counter genetic tests can predict our risk of cancer Read More The 7 questions we must answer to beat cancer Category Science blog October 12 2015 Nick Peel This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series Grand Challenge The world s biggest cancer experts have selected 7 research challenges that must be tackled to beat cancer we take a look at what they chose Read More Recently funded research understanding what makes cancer tick Category Science blog October 2 2015 Alan Worsley Here are a few highlights from the research projects our Science Committee funded in April Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/research-and-trials/cancer-genes/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Family history - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Family history Topic Family history CRISPR gene editing new chapter in cancer research or blot in the ethical copybook Category Science blog February 1 2016 Nick Peel We explore a new revolutionary gene editing technology called CRISPR that s taking labs by storm as scientists look to understand the genetics behind cancer Read More I couldn t believe how much things had moved on Nicola s story Category Science blog July 23 2014 Henry Scowcroft Find out how with thanks from Cancer Research UK scientists bowel cancer treatment has phenomenally improved from when Nicola s mother had the disease Read More Too good to be true A blood test to predict breast cancer Category Science blog June 27 2014 Henry Scowcroft We look at the science behind media stories about a simple blood test that apparently can predict breast cancer Read More Red meat and breast cancer still no solid evidence Category Science blog June 11 2014 Nick Peel Following wide media coverage of a study linking eating large amounts of red meat and breast cancer we explain why the evidence just isn t there yet Read More Celebrity cancer stories help or hindrance Category Science blog July 5 2013 Kat Arney Cancer news often gets more attention if a celebrity has been diagnosed but does this help raise awareness or can the celebrity angle do more harm than good Read More Twenty five years since landmark bowel cancer discovery Category Science blog August 28 2012 Josephine Querido There s a lot more to do before we can say we ve beaten cancer but every now and then it s good to sit back and reflect on how far we ve already come Read More Bowel cancer 40 years of progress but early detection is key Category Science blog April 2 2012 Henry Scowcroft Spotting cancer early can save lives Over the last nine weeks the Department of Health has been running a campaign called Be Clear on Cancer aimed at r Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/risks-causes/family-history/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Gene therapy - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Gene therapy Topic Gene therapy CRISPR gene editing new chapter in cancer research or blot in the ethical copybook Category Science blog February 1 2016 Nick Peel We explore a new revolutionary gene editing technology called CRISPR that s taking labs by storm as scientists look to understand the genetics behind cancer Read More Biotherapeutics a new funding scheme for research Category Science blog October 21 2014 Alan Worsley Our latest funding scheme focuses on the emerging field of biotherapeutics smarter cancer treatments based on cells and biological molecules Read More Could stealth viruses and microbubbles help treat cancer Category Science blog February 14 2014 Kat Arney Our researchers are developing innovative new techniques to find better ways to treat cancer in the future Read More Expert Opinion Professor Nick Lemoine on pancreatic cancer Category Science blog October 12 2011 Safia Danovi Pancreatic cancer continues to be one of the hardest cancers to treat so as part of our Research Strategy we ve pledged to boost research in this area with Read More April podcast is now live Category Science blog April 9 2009 Kat Arney In April s podcast we find out about cancer research in Northern Ireland as the charity unveils the latest Cancer Research UK Centre in Belfast Professo Read More Nano scale advance in targeted cancer therapy Category Science blog March 24 2009 Kat Arney Perhaps the biggest challenge in cancer treatment is the issue of selectivity how to kill cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed But many comm Read More Viruses in disguise could be key to ovarian cancer treatment Category Science blog July 30 2008 Kat Arney Ovarian cancer affects over 6 600 women in the UK and 190 000 worldwide every year What s more treating it successfully can be difficult Women are often Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/cancer-treatment/gene-therapy/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Immunotherapy - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Immunotherapy Topic Immunotherapy CRISPR gene editing new chapter in cancer research or blot in the ethical copybook Category Science blog February 1 2016 Nick Peel We explore a new revolutionary gene editing technology called CRISPR that s taking labs by storm as scientists look to understand the genetics behind cancer Read More Engineering a cancer fighting immune super soldier Category Science blog January 19 2016 Laura Mears We explore the promise and challenges of research looking to engineer patients immune cells to fight cancer Read More The biggest cancer science stories of 2015 Category Science blog December 22 2015 Aine McCarthy We ve enlisted the help of one of our researchers to pick out the biggest cancer research stories of 2015 Read More Expert Opinion Professor Richard Gilbertson talks children s cancers Category Science blog November 26 2015 Alan Worsley We caught up with Professor Richard Gilbertson to find out the challenges facing research into children s cancers and where the field is heading Read More NCRI cancer conference day 4 the cost of cancer care and the immune system again Category Science blog November 5 2015 Nick Peel Our final report from the 2015 NCRI cancer conference featuring the cost of cancer drugs and another update on immunotherapy Read More The 7 questions we must answer to beat cancer Category Science blog October 12 2015 Nick Peel This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series Grand Challenge The world s biggest cancer experts have selected 7 research challenges that must be tackled to beat cancer we take a look at what they chose Read More Expert Opinion Professor Peter Johnson on cancer immunotherapy Category Science blog September 17 2015 Henry Scowcroft We quiz our chief clinician Professor Peter Johnson to get his take on the history of cancer immunotherapy and where the field is heading Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/cancer-treatment/immunotherapy/ (2016-02-11)
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  • News digest – drug approval, flexible pressure sensor, pen-sized microscope, engineered molecules and… olive oil? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    us Home About us Cancer news Science blog News digest drug approval flexible pressure sensor pen sized microscope engineered molecules and olive oil News digest drug approval flexible pressure sensor pen sized microscope engineered molecules and olive oil Category Science blog January 30 2016 Nick Peel A flexible pressure sensor that wraps around and conforms to the shape of the fingers while still accurately measuring pressure distribution Credit 2016 Someya Laboratory We launched a new Cough up campaign asking the Government to make tobacco companies pay for the damage they cause with a levy to help fund Stop Smoking Services Here s our press release you can sign the petition here and we blogged about the campaign too The World Health Organisation released new figures on the global burden of childhood obesity Here s the Guardian s report Japanese scientists have developed a flexible pressure sensor that could be used in health examinations But it s some way off being used to detect breast cancer as claimed by the Mail Online A pen sized microscope developed by US scientists could give doctors a quick way to spot the difference between healthy and cancerous tissue It needs testing in clinical trials first though but Wired and Gizmodo have the details The ovarian cancer drug olaparib Lynparza which our scientists played a key role in developing will be made available on the NHS for women with faulty BRCA1 or 2 genes and who have responded to chemotherapy The Guardian has more on this Alongside this the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence also published three other recommendations for cancer treatments US scientists believe they can engineer new molecules allowing cells to sense and respond to changes in the body including cancer STAT News covered this but it s still at the stages of tinkering in lab grown cells for now Number of the week 4 000 The profit in pounds made by the tobacco industry for each death caused by smoking Men with advanced prostate cancer can now be treated with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel before waiting to see if hormone based treatments have failed according to new NHS guidelines The Guardian has more on this US research in fish is uncovering the earliest origins of melanoma reports the New York Times A small study of women treated for breast cancer found that chemotherapy can have long lasting effects on the levels of immune cells in the body The Mail Online covered this but larger studies are needed to fully pin down how this might affect patients While death rates from lung cancer are falling more women are dying of the disease in the UK than in other EU countries according to new stats The Mail Online has the details The bacteria that cause anthrax are being modified by scientists as a possible way of getting drugs inside cancer cells But this is very early research on cells grown in the lab so the Express and Mirror got a little carried

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2016/01/30/news-digest-drug-approval-flexible-pressure-sensor-pen-sized-microscope-engineered-molecules-and-olive-oil/ (2016-02-11)
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