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  • Achieving the world’s best cancer survival - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    which paint a similar picture So why is UK cancer survival lagging behind These findings are obviously of great concern to us all as more than 1 in 3 people are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime So where is the UK going wrong and how can it improve This is a question that many researchers have been looking into and their research falls into two broad areas early diagnosis and access to the best treatment 1 Improving early diagnosis You are more likely to survive cancer if it s spotted early But the ICBP studies showed that for lung cancer and to a lesser extent bowel cancer UK patients are often diagnosed at later stages compared to other similar countries This could help explain the lower survival we see for those cancers Further highlighting the importance of early diagnosis the ICBP has shown that the UK s cancer survival looks much more like that of other similar countries if you only look at the proportion of UK patients who survive the first year after diagnosis and who then go on to survive at least five more years In other words this analysis excludes the UK patients who died within the first year who are most often those who were diagnosed late This phenomenon of the UK s overall five year survival figures being dragged down by the people diagnosed late seems to occur for all the cancers studied except lung cancer A study by the NCIN that we ve discussed before called Routes to diagnoses supports these concerns For patients with lung cancer the study found that between 2006 and 2008 four in ten 39 per cent were diagnosed via an emergency hospital admission Patients with brain and pancreatic cancer are even more likely to be diagnosed via this route six 62 per cent and five 50 per cent in ten respectively This is generally bad news Survival falls for patients diagnosed via an emergency admission and this is thought to be due to them being diagnosed later Although the treatment patients receive will also be important these studies give us clear evidence that diagnosing cancer earlier will boost UK survival Public attitudes and symptom awareness Although the ICBP has shown that people in the UK are as aware of cancer symptoms as their international counterparts differences emerge when we look at attitudes to using GP services People in the UK were more likely to mention barriers to seeing their GP In Sweden just one in 10 people said they would be worried about wasting the doctor s time in the UK it s three in 10 there s more on this in our blog post from last year So how do we break the pattern Avoiding stereotypical British behaviour like keeping a stiff upper lip and worrying about bothering our doctor would be a good start If you spot a persistent change to your body that s out of the ordinary then your GP needs to know the sooner the better At the conference Lucy Ironmonger from Cancer Research UK presented results of the 2012 Be Clear on Cancer campaign for lung cancer The campaign appeared on TV radio and on posters across England urging people to go to the GP if they had a cough lasting longer than three weeks This resulted in around 700 more people being diagnosed 300 of whom were diagnosed early enough to go on to receive surgery which is vital for improving their chance of survival Thanks to a very thorough evaluation the team showed that the impact came from improvements across the board from public symptom awareness to the number of people GPs sent for chest x rays Referring patients to be diagnosed People often raise concerns over whether GPs refer enough people for tests and whether these tests are carried out quickly enough something a number of talks at the conference examined It s important to note that diagnosing cancer early is a challenge for GPs and there are many factors at play when GPs make decisions to refer or not On average they see fewer than eight new cancer cases each year despite thousands of patients arriving with potential cancer symptoms To support GPs in diagnosing cancer earlier we need to examine issues such as how easily they can refer people on for diagnostic tests and look at the referral process to help GPs act when symptoms are less clear cut Sean Duffy National Clinical Director for Cancer presented data from the Diagnostic Imaging Dataset on the time it takes for diagnostic tests using imaging such as ultrasound and CT scans to be carried out for patients in hospital compared to those referred by a GP In hospital with the high costs of having a patient staying in a bed tests were carried out in just a few days But when GPs requested tests it took longer for almost all the types of test Women referred by their GP for an ultrasound test can end up waiting almost 50 days for them to be carried out and there were additional delays in getting the results back to the GP This is clearly too long prompting important questions about whether the system is placing too many restrictions on GPs The ICBP has also been looking at how to support GPs in diagnosing patients early by using online surveys to see whether GP attitudes or behaviour contribute to later referrals or tests The results are not yet published but will examine key questions including whether GPs in England Northern Ireland and Wales may be less likely to send a patient for tests or to refer them at their first consultation than those in the other ICBP countries 2 Access to treatment But early diagnosis alone does not explain the UK s lower survival access to the best treatment has increasingly been shown to be a problem And this is particularly true of treatment rates in older people Both

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/07/14/achieving-the-worlds-best-cancer-survival/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Lung cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Lung cancer Topic Lung cancer Lab work one day caring for patients the next the life of a clinician scientist Category Science blog December 23 2015 Cancer Research UK One of our clinician scientists explains what it s like balancing lab work and caring for patients Read More The biggest cancer science stories of 2015 Category Science blog December 22 2015 Aine McCarthy We ve enlisted the help of one of our researchers to pick out the biggest cancer research stories of 2015 Read More Diesel emissions an emerging public health issue Category Science blog November 24 2015 Henry Scowcroft As experts call for more research into the influence of diesel emissions on lung cancer rates in non smokers we take a look at the state of the evidence Read More Jumping the queue could pharmacists help spot cancer Category Science blog October 22 2015 Eshe Jackson Nyakasikana We look at an important research project that s trying to find out if pharmacists could help diagnose cancers earlier Read More Two years on for our pioneering TRACERx lung cancer study Category Science blog September 2 2015 Henry Scowcroft Two years ago we launched a pioneering 15m lung cancer study Find out what s happened since through the eyes of Terrence a patient taking part Read More Our milestones Cisplatin the story of a platinum selling life saver Category Science blog August 26 2015 Lucy Holmes This entry is part 23 of 25 in the series Our milestones In the latest in Our Milestones series we look at how Cancer Research UK scientists helped develop one of the world s most successful cancer drugs Read More NHS England must act as patients miss out on cancer drug tests Category Science blog August 20 2015 Emlyn Samuel We explore our latest report showing that thousands of cancer patients are missing out on genetic tests for targeted cancer drugs Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/cancer-type/lung/ (2016-02-11)
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  • The link between air pollution and cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    exposed to air pollution the IARC evaluation considered the evidence from studies on animals and cells in the lab This type of evidence isn t enough by itself to prove a link but taken together with studies in people it helps strengthen the case Taking all this evidence into account and with the above limitations in mind IARC now believes outdoor air pollution should be considered a cancer causing substance a carcinogen How big is the risk But the chance of any one person in the UK developing lung cancer specifically due to air pollution is pretty small As with most cancer risk factors the risk is higher the more someone is exposed to the substance Air pollution is a complicated mixture that can contain many components and different people will have been exposed to different amounts depending on their lifestyle But it s unlikely that in the UK many people would be exposed to high enough levels to make any noticeable difference to their risk of lung cancer It s important that people keep the risk from air pollution in perspective Although air pollution increases the risk of developing lung cancer by a small amount other things have a much bigger effect on our risk particularly smoking How does the risk compare with smoking Being a smoker poses a much bigger risk to health than air pollution Long term smokers can have 20 times the risk of lung cancer compared to people who have never smoked And research has shown that more than eight out of 10 lung cancers in the UK are caused by smoking If you smoke tobacco will have a much bigger impact on your risk of cancer than air pollution will And the best thing you can do for your health is to quit studies have shown that even long term smokers who quit in their 60s gain valuable years of life What about things like obesity alcohol and diet On an individual level the chance of developing lung cancer due to air pollution is pretty small But small effects over large populations matter In other words because air pollution potentially affects all of us it is an important cause of lung cancer across the whole population And air pollution has also been linked to heart disease as well as asthma attacks and other lung conditions The WHO s major Global Burden of Disease project last year published an analysis of the most important risk factors that contribute to disease around the world This includes cancer as well as conditions like heart disease and diabetes The position in the list reflects both how much something increases the risk of disease and also how many people are affected For the area of Western Europe tobacco unsurprisingly topped the list as the biggest contributor to disease in the region And air pollution came in at number 11 Between tobacco and air pollution the WHO list several key factors related to lifestyle that we know increase the risk of cancer High body mass indexes BMIs alcohol and low physical activity respectively rank 3rd 4th and 5th as causes of disease within Western Europe So although air pollution can increase the risk of cancer and other diseases overall sticking to a healthy lifestyle is still an important part of reducing the risk of cancer And importantly our lifestyles are within our own control And we wouldn t want worries about air pollution to put people off walking and cycling A really important way we can help cut the risk from air pollution is to create less of it People choosing to use their cars less often could make a big difference to levels of air pollution And as we ve already mentioned being active is also a great way to improve your health and reduce your risk of cancer Some studies have found that when they modeled the effects of more people in a city choosing active transport options like walking and cycling overall people s health improved How can we tackle air pollution Air pollution is one of the classic problems of public health according to Dr Dana Loomis of IARC speaking at the press conference Tackling air pollution requires leadership and action at both national and local level But there are some things we can try ourselves to reduce the levels of air pollution we re exposed to In general if you re walking running or cycling try to choose a route that uses smaller less busy roads For some areas the Walkit website has a low pollution option Apart from anything else your walk is likely to be a more pleasant experience on quieter streets This announcement should act as a stepping stone for national and even international action to address air pollution We want the government and other relevant authorities to introduce measures to reduce air pollution to levels within EU limits to protect people s health Reference Images courtesy of Tony Oxborrow via Flickr Share this article More on this topic Tags Cancer in the news Causes of cancer Chemicals Environment and pollution Lung cancer Comments Click here to cancel reply vinsensia makrina February 3 2014 of course air pollution although if you were true scientists and not now just a disgraceful propaganda organisation Fake Charity you would have written the same sentences in opposition to the smoking ban It s a shame you didn t provide the claimed relative risk from air pollution I suspect it might be greater than the relative risk of 1 2 you claimed for 4 hours a day exposure to passive smoking And now you want ecigs regulated out of existence I guess they are competition for you as they are going to prevent more cases of lung cancer than you have a hope in hell of curing in the next thousand years What a disgrace your organisation has become Helen December 8 2013 I m a 45 year old woman when diagnosed with terminal lung cancer I

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2013/10/18/the-link-between-air-pollution-and-cancer/comment-page-1/ (2016-02-11)
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  • ‘Having cancer makes my work even more meaningful’ – Emma’s story - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    was how incredibly painful it had all been the first time round By this time I was with David he was such an immense support to me and stayed by my side the whole time I had more surgery to remove more of my tongue and thankfully it was a success Life carried on as normal for the next two years I was in good health and David and I had our first child a little boy called Jamie But then the cancer came back for a third time This time round Jamie was a whole new reason to survive I had to get through this for him I had a third surgery to remove the cancer It was extremely tough but I got through it I had to for my son It was unbearable to think about A year later things were looking up again I was enjoying working in a lab as a cancer researcher and had given birth to my second child a little girl called Isobel We were a happy family of four But the bubble burst again I was diagnosed with oral cancer for a fourth time It was two weeks after I d given birth to Isobel After I got the diagnosis I looked at my daughter and thought If I die she ll have no memory of me It was unbearable I recorded my voice for her to listen to while I was in hospital just talking to her and singing her silly songs I looked at my daughter and thought If I die she ll have no memory of me But I couldn t bring myself to record any goodbyes The thought of it was heartbreaking This time the treatment was more complex and even more painful I had an eight hour operation to remove a large section of my tongue which was then replaced with a graft from my forearm I needed a tube in my neck so I could breathe and another tube to eat The treatment was awful The whole thing was so painful and really unpleasant I even had to learn how to talk again This time was the hardest and not just because of the treatment I couldn t see my son Jamie the whole time I was in hospital he was nearly two years old so it would have been too hard for him to see me like that Thankfully I did get to see Isobel she was too young to fully understand what was happening Seeing her really got me back on my feet I wanted to spend more time with them have more time as a family I had to get better for them and for myself My parents were amazing each time I was diagnosed but particularly the fourth time They moved in to the family home for a couple of months to help with David and the kids and everything they were an invaluable support When I left the hospital after my

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/08/14/having-cancer-makes-my-work-even-more-meaningful-emmas-story/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Pushing ‘unstable’ pancreatic cancers over the edge - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    leading to cancer Unsurprisingly the team found that these genes were commonly damaged or faulty in their group of patients But frustratingly no other genes were found to be altered nearly as frequently across their samples instead they found a whole host of different mutations in each cancer If the team were going to find new genetic culprits for pancreatic cancer or targets for new drugs they would have to keep looking So next they decided to look at structural changes in the DNA from patients tumours The Unknown The genetic shuffling in the tumours revealed something completely new the samples could be divided into four distinct groups based on the level and type of structural variation in each tumour s DNA About a fifth 20 per cent of the tumours were stable with relatively low levels of DNA shuffling A third were what they called locally rearranged 30 per cent meaning shuffling only happened in a particular area of the genome Another third was described as scattered 36 per cent they displayed quite a bit of genetic shuffling in lots of areas of the genome And most intriguingly about 14 of their hundred samples were unstable tumours with incredibly chaotic DNA Fingering the culprits Watch an animation exploring 10 things you might not know about pancreatic cancer Having discovered that there are at least four types of pancreatic cancer The Pancreatic Team decided to look at tumours with unstable genomes in more detail Back in 2013 researchers from the Sanger Institute in Cambridge made an important discovery The identified the molecular fingerprints of at least twenty different damaging processes at work in our DNA we blogged about it in detail at the time One of these fingerprints was frequently seen in breast ovarian and pancreatic tumours often though not always in those that also had a mutation in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene which are involved in repairing damaged DNA When either of these genes is damaged or missing cells can t repair their DNA properly and mistakes quickly build up driving the development of cancer These BRCA related tumours tend to have a high level of genetic chaos just like the unstable pancreatic tumours in the new study To find out if similar processes were at work the team decided to see whether the unstable pancreatic tumours also had the chaotic genetic hallmarks of faulty BRCA genes as well as checking for faults in the BRCA genes themselves They found that nine of the 11 tumours with unstable genomes had the unmistakeable fingerprints caused by faulty BRCA And most of these also had a mistake in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 This suggested that the three phenomena were related having an unstable genome having lots of BRCA related DNA damage and having a faulty BRCA gene This opens up an extremely interesting possibility Pushing tumours over the edge Different classes of chemotherapy drug work in different ways Most pancreatic cancer patients who have chemotherapy are given a drug called gemcitabine which mimics the structure of the building blocks of our DNA and interferes with how it s copied inside cancer cells Platinum based drugs like cisplatin form another class of treatment These form random chemical bridges between DNA molecules causing them to break up when cancer cells divide The cells can t survive with such fragmented DNA so they die Over the years researchers have discovered that platinum drugs appear to be highly effective in cancers that already have unstable DNA they seem to push them over the edge and kill them They re not normally used to treat pancreatic cancer But under some circumstances patients can and do receive them In some cases they help but in others they don t suggesting there might be a subset of these patients who can benefit from them Professor Biankin s team decided to explore whether the most unstable tumours in their study were the sort of cancers that could be successfully treated with platinum drugs Of the hundred patients in the study eight had received platinum drugs five of whom had unstable tumours and three who didn t Amazingly two of the unstable patients had had exceptional responses Their cancers had completely gone Two more had robust partial responses meaning most but not quite all of their cancer disappeared This is amazing Let s take it outside Then the team did something even more ingenious As part of their study they managed to grow some of the patients tumours in groups of mice known as patient derived xenografts These animals were given different drugs to see how they responded Where the tumours had come from a patient with an unstable tumour two out of three tumours responded to platinum drugs and shrank But none of tumours from other patients responded to the platinum based chemotherapy This is an extremely promising finding and suggests that a tumour s unstableness if it can be reliably measured could be a promising marker for how to treat patients with pancreatic cancer What Next The team s results suggest that if a patient s pancreatic tumour has an unstable genome they might benefit from platinum based chemotherapy drugs or even the researchers speculate newer PARP inhibitor drugs like olaparib These are therapies that interfere with a DNA repair protein called PARP and are known to work particularly well in cancers driven by BRCA gene faults Because of technical limitations we re not quite at the point where we can perform whole genome sequencing in a clinical trial to identify patients with unstable genomes Professor Biankin This would be a big step forward for patients But it s still early days The only way to find out if an unstable genome is a good way to identify platinum sensitive pancreatic cancer patients is to develop a robust test that accurately selects these people and assesses how well the drugs work for them in clinical trials This is something Professor Biankin is keen to do although

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/02/26/pushing-unstable-pancreatic-cancers-over-the-edge/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Aspirin, obesity and inherited bowel cancer – what’s the story? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    with Lynch syndrome It s being co ordinated by researchers in Newcastle and Sheffield but involves people with Lynch syndrome from 16 different countries and is funded by several organisations including Cancer Research UK Participants were given either aspirin or a placebo for two years and then followed for up to 10 years to see if they developed cancer Results published back in 2011 showed that aspirin could indeed reduce their risk of developing bowel cancer What s new This finding only applies to people who have an inherited genetic syndrome that greatly increases their cancer risk The results that hit the headlines today were a reanalysis of the data from the CAPP2 trial focusing on those participants who were overweight and obese The researchers found that these people had an even greater increase in bowel cancer risk compared to those in the trial who were a healthy weight But among different sub groups of people some of these results weren t statistically significant meaning there s uncertainty over how valid they are the effects appeared strongest in men and those who were obese rather than just overweight and were only significant in those with one of the four different genetic faults that causes Lynch syndrome However when the researchers looked at the people taking aspirin those who were overweight and obese had no greater risk than people who were a healthy weight So it looks as though in people with Lynch syndrome aspirin could potentially cancel out the effect being overweight or obese This is an important finding But here s a great big caveat that s not the same as aspirin cancelling out the affect of being overweight or obese among people in the general population as most of today s headlines implied And even for this high risk group of people there are still some questions that need to be answered before doctors can start recommending they take aspirin regularly For example it s not yet known if these results apply to men and women the different types of Lynch syndrome and all weights above the healthy range And the actual number of bowel cancer cases among the 937 participants was relatively small just 55 It s also uncertain what the most effective dose of aspirin to take is To answer these questions we re funding the CAPP3 trial which will determine the correct dose of aspirin to take while looking to confirm the CAPP2 trial s findings Until we know more people with a family history of bowel cancer should talk to their doctor about regular screening and the best options for them Unclear mechanisms And there s more we need to learn too While we know that overweight and obese people may be at an increased risk of up to 10 types of cancer and that aspirin can protect against some types of cancers crucially we don t know exactly either how obesity causes cancer nor how aspirin can protect against it But there are

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/08/18/aspirin-obesity-and-inherited-bowel-cancer-whats-the-story/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Cancer ‘the best way to die’? You couldn’t be more wrong if you tried - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    7 you could have no possible idea what the emotional stress is like for us She has to tend me daily even though to all intents and purposes I m not dying from cancer at the moment But I am dying And the chemotherapy is a big contributory factor at this stage We can never get the subject out of our lives there is always some physical or psychological factor that aggravates our emotional state We laugh we cry we despair She tries to keep the constant barrage of well wishers in their box But when it comes to the family that is a tough call I have an 85 year old mother who doesn t know how to come to terms with the fact that she ll have to bury her son At the same time she sees herself as the victim in this tragedy not me So hopefully when you ve reviewed some of the evidence I ve put forward and investigated its validity across a wider sample of terminal cancer patients you ll realise that cancer isn t actually the best way to die And in taking these thoughts on board I d like you to also know that I m by no means at the worst end of the spectrum I m still doing relatively well compared to many cancer patients whose ordeals greatly outweigh my current problems More research is needed Now to conclude this response I will briefly touch on the outrageous idea that we should stop wasting billions trying to cure cancer I noted in your follow up article that you tried to reframe that But since I have not seen one national media pick up on this I must respond directly to the words you first wrote I m privileged to have many friends in the medical world who specialise in cancer I have also had a very long and productive association with Cancer Research UK across a range of varied and in my view significant activities Let me tell you what I ve learnt Their research activities have completely changed the survivorship of some of the most common cancers It wasn t long ago that most breast cancer patients died within 10 years Now more than three quarters survive 10 years Those women used to suffer a long traumatic futile death Now they can have hope that they ll survive it and return to lead full and active lives Try telling their families that we should stop doing the research We must not stop till we can save them all In contrast just 1 in every hundred pancreatic cancer patients survive 10 years And sadly little has changed that over the recent decades Sure it s too late for me but you know what Richard It gladdens my heart to know that Cancer Research is looking deeply and holistically into how they can change that for the future Without their unstinting dedication and ingenuity supported by the generous pockets of the UK public we d have no hope Until my health completely fails me I will continue to work and support research into lifestyle prevention early diagnosis and cure And so must you People die of cancer because it gets spotted too late In my own experience I was locally advanced stage 3 for both my cancers Like so many cancers there are no symptoms until it too late Those involved in spending the money know that they must achieve early diagnosis and also look to lifestyle changes where appropriate I would commend you to read Cancer Research UK s Research Strategy I have seen many wonderful initiatives in these efforts that will save millions of people in time because they are so diligent at figuring out ways to cost effectively identify those at risk You ll know as I do that routine mass screening is simply not viable commercially nor clinically no matter how big the pot But ingenious tests that can identify those who should be sent for investigation are coming thick and fast I run a patient support group for gastro oesophageal cancers at Charing Cross Hospital in association with Maggie s Centres So I ve had hundreds of patients through my hands over the last 7 years Despite what the statistics might suggest a significant proportion of those patients probably 25 30 per cent are young By that I mean under 40 It breaks my heart every time I meet a 20 or 30 year old with cancer I felt cheated at 50 and to a certain extent feel cheated at 59 But that pales into insignificance compared to watching a 32 year old single mother die of oesophageal cancer when the system tells you that we should focus on men over 50 with alarm symptoms Richard you really can t believe in those words you wrote According to the latest figures 2 5 million people in the UK are living with and beyond a cancer diagnosis It is absolutely vital that we continue to research the prevention and treatment of the disease In conclusion the one thing we would probably agree on if you were brave enough to meet me is that as a society we should get our s t together on assisted dying I still don t get why we are able to do it for animals but refuse it for humans But as I face the inevitable outcome of my terminal diagnosis the one thing I REALLY want above all else is the opportunity to say I ve had enough it s time to put me to sleep Larry Cancer Research UK s Information Nurses are available 9am 5pm Monday to Friday on Freephone 0808 800 4040 We also have a discussion forum Cancer Chat for people affected by cancer and there s a section on our website that discusses death and dying Share this article More on this topic Tags Cancer controversies Cancer in the news Oesophageal cancer Pancreatic cancer Quality of

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/01/19/cancer-the-best-way-to-die-you-couldnt-be-more-wrong-if-you-tried/ (2016-02-11)
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  • A ‘simple urine test’ for pancreatic cancer? Not just yet. - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer patients And this could be a fairly big stumbling block for a useful test and might have implications for who it could potentially benefit So before we go galloping down the road to clinical tests there are some key questions that still need answering Key questions The first one being even if this test were proven reliable in future studies who would you offer it to The test is unlikely be used on the general population due to the relative infrequency of pancreatic cancer which would mean it wouldn t be time or cost effective A useful test for pancreatic cancer is rather more likely to be targeted towards groups at higher risk such as those with chronic pancreatitis or with a family history of the disease Any test that aimed to spot pancreatic cancer would also need to be able to reliably tell the difference between cancer and other non cancerous conditions like chronic pancreatitis or diabetes And as mentioned previously this three protein method can t yet reliably discriminate between those with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is much less reliable Another question we have is whether the protein levels are still as accurate at predicting cancer when the control group healthy people is as old as the pancreatic cancer patients The median age of healthy patients on the study and those with pancreatic cancer differed by over 20 years As the risk of cancer increase with age it is crucial to see if the results are the same when comparing apples to apples Next steps To address some of these questions the team is now planning further research on urine sample from high risk groups as well as collecting more long term data to see if the proteins are present in urine in the time between the genetic changes that could cause the cancer to develop and diagnosis But the key thing that needs to be proven in future research is whether the ability to detect pancreatic cancers using this test translates into earlier diagnoses and lives saved But the question of whom could benefit from such a test still remains This story touches on two hugely important areas pancreatic cancer and the search for ways to diagnose cancer earlier These are both areas we re prioritising in our new research strategy so it s always welcome when new findings move things forward But we need to be careful not to over egg things and raise false hope of new tests when there s such a long way ahead Misha Reference Crnogorac Jurcevic Tatjana Identification Of A Three Biomarker Panel In Urine For Early Detection Of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Cancer Research 21 15 2015 3512 3521 Share this article More on this topic Tags Biomarker research Cancer in the news Diagnosing cancer Early detection Pancreatic cancer Research and trials Screening Tests Comments Click here to cancel reply Paul Toovey September 27 2015 While no one in my family have died from this

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/08/03/a-simple-urine-test-for-pancreatic-cancer-not-just-yet/ (2016-02-11)
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