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  • Can pigeons home in on cancer? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    our own visual systems work to study the pigeons eye view of the world Dr Robert Levenson the study s lead author is based at University of California and studies pathology and laboratory medicine It was after he heard about pigeons exceptional visual memories that he set out to find out what they could do with medical images I was driving into work a few years ago and I heard a news report about a study on visual memory in pigeons he recounts and for no particularly good reason it occurred to me to wonder how well pigeons might do when confronted with some pathology related image tasks Could they tell diseased tissue apart from healthy tissue And could this tell us anything about how the human brain processes these images Levenson s team s study published today in PLOS ONE journal showed that eight specially trained pigeons were correctly able to tell the difference between microscope images of benign and malignant human breast tissue over 80 per cent of the time The researchers trained the pigeons using a technique called food reinforcement when the pigeon chose correctly they got food if they didn t get the right answer no food was delivered They did this every day for 144 trials After the training was complete the pigeons were tested to see if they could do the same but with new images and no reinforcement if they got the answer right The pigeons training environment Image courtesy of Levenson and Wasserman Results showed that not only could the pigeons categorise the images but also successfully demonstrated their ability to learn how to find the key discriminating features necessary to make that classification In fact even when the images were presented in different formats such as varying magnification colour versus monochrome or rotated the pigeons were still able to spot which images contained signs of cancer This told the researchers that the way pigeons visually discriminate between medical images is similar to humans For example pathologists often look for certain characteristics like cell shape on an image that help determine if it s benign or malignant It seems from the study s results that pigeons may use similar characteristics to differentiate between images The team also showed that if they grouped the pigeons together and got them to vote on the images otherwise known as flock sourcing they got the answer right 99 per cent of the time They also tested the pigeon s ability to find signs of cancer in mammogram images Results showed that the pigeons could only memorise the training images When they were shown new images of mammograms the pigeons couldn t tell the difference between the ones that showed signs of cancer and the one s that didn t Although pigeons are unlikely to be called upon to offer clinical diagnostic support it does seem quite possible that their discriminative abilities may be turned to a useful purpose writes Dr Levenson Useful Purpose The aim here

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/11/18/can-pigeons-home-in-on-cancer/comment-page-1/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Sarah Hazell | Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Author Sarah Hazell Author Sarah Hazell Sarah spent four years as a lab researcher and soon after went to help develop an exhibition on the human body at Glasgow Science Centre Sarah worked in Cancer Research UK s science communications team between 2013 and 2014 writing and talking about the fabulous job our researchers are doing in the fight against cancer Mustard gas from the Great War to frontline chemotherapy Category Science blog August 27 2014 Sarah Hazell This entry is part 17 of 25 in the series Our milestones From the Great War trenches to the frontline against cancer mustard gas has come a long way thanks to the outstanding research of chemist Alexander Haddow Read More A tribute to Professor Julian Lewis Category Science blog May 2 2014 Sarah Hazell We pay tribute to Professor Julian Lewis an inspirational scientist and mentor who sadly passed away this week Read More The link between working with asbestos and mesothelioma case closed Category Science blog January 20 2014 Sarah Hazell This entry is part 15 of 25 in the series Our milestones In 1978 Professor Julian Peto published a scientific paper that influenced many lives by helping to usher in an era free from asbestos Read More Cancer wounds and inflammation something fishy going on Category Science blog December 5 2013 Sarah Hazell Professor Paul Martin tells us about his cancer journey and his research on wound healing and cancer Read More Counting copies HER2 and the development of Herceptin Category Science blog September 20 2013 Sarah Hazell This entry is part 14 of 25 in the series Our milestones Continuing Our Milestones series we take a look at a key breast cancer molecule and the development of the breast cancer drug Herceptin Read More Cancer cells spreading around the body a dangerous game Category Science blog September 11 2013 Sarah Hazell Research is showing how understanding the key controls that make cells move could help fight the lethal spread of cancer Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/author/sarah-hazell/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Mesothelioma - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Mesothelioma Topic Mesothelioma The link between working with asbestos and mesothelioma case closed Category Science blog January 20 2014 Sarah Hazell This entry is part 15 of 25 in the series Our milestones In 1978 Professor Julian Peto published a scientific paper that influenced many lives by helping to usher in an era free from asbestos Read More Nano no no You cannot be serious Category Science blog May 22 2008 Henry Scowcroft Nanotechnology technology on a microscopic scale has been one of the scientific buzzwords bandied about most often in recent years Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/cancer-type/mesothelioma/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Harpal Kumar | Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Balkwill Professor Andrew Biankin See all researchers More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Author Harpal Kumar Author Harpal Kumar Taskforce report achieving world class cancer outcomes Category Science blog July 19 2015 Harpal Kumar Alongside my role as Cancer Research UK s chief executive I am honoured to have spent the last 6 months chairing the Independent Cancer Taskforce and we hav Read More Smoking Still Kills that s why we re committed to a strategy to tackle tobacco Category Science blog June 10 2015 Harpal Kumar Our chief executive Harpal Kumar spoke at the Parliamentary launch of Action on Smoking and Health s ASH new report Smoking Still Kills Read More My role as independent chair of the Cancer Strategy Taskforce Category Science blog January 11 2015 Harpal Kumar Our chief executive Harpal Kumar has been invited to be the independent chair of a new Cancer Strategy Taskforce here he explains what that will involve Read More Seve Ballesteros a legend on and off the golf course Category Science blog May 7 2011 Harpal Kumar We ve just received the extremely sad news that golfing legend Seve Ballesteros has lost his fight against brain cancer I had the great honour of meeting Sev Read More Sir Bobby Robson 1933 2009 Category Science blog July 31 2009 Harpal Kumar We re very saddened to hear that Sir Bobby Robson has passed away Sir Bobby was a hugely valued and strong supporter of Cancer Research UK over many y Read More Jade Goody dies Category Science blog March 22 2009 Harpal Kumar We are very sad to hear of Jade s death and our thoughts are with her family and friends at this devastating time Every single death from cancer is a tra Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer Processed meat and cancer what you need to

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/author/harpalkumar/ (2016-02-11)
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  • ‘Smoking Still Kills’ – that’s why we’re committed to a strategy to tackle tobacco - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    9 per cent in 2015 However we know that four in 10 cancers in the UK can be prevented with tobacco use continuing to be the most important preventable cause Quitting smoking is the single best thing an individual can do for their health implementing a comprehensive tobacco control plan is the single best thing the country can do for public health Recognising this in our new strategy we have made a commitment to significantly increase our investment in tobacco control research policy and advocacy work Cancer Research UK has a long track record in funding tobacco research and of funding advocacy programmes including our long term funding for the excellent work ASH undertakes As our understanding of the health harms of tobacco use has evolved over the last 60 years we have also seen the tobacco epidemic like the industry that is its vector expand globally So building on our success in the UK we have recently committed 5 million to an International Consortium for Action and Research on Tobacco working with other international funders such as the United States National Cancer Institute We have also increased our investment in harm reduction and e cigarette related research and established the UK Electronic Cigarette Research Forum in partnership with Public Health England to provide independent assessment of the evidence relating to electronic cigarettes Investing in Research Harpal delivering his speech Credit Nicolas Chinardet We believe that continued investment in research is essential to underpin an evidence based approach to tobacco policy and practice And as we provide new investment and adapt to new challenges we must also redouble our efforts to address established challenges such as deep rooted smoking related health inequalities which exist across the UK One third of all cigarettes smoked in England are smoked by people with a mental health disorder while smoking rates in the prison population are estimated to be at least eight in ten and as high as nine in ten among homeless people The long term goal as set out in the Smoking Still Kills report must be to reduce smoking rates to five per cent or below in all socio economic groups and to tackle smoking rates in other communities who are disproportionately burdened by tobacco use To do this we will need new approaches that target those communities with the highest smoking rates These should include inventive health marketing campaigns continued enforcement and supply controls to tackle the illicit trade and ensuring we see investment in gold standard smoking cessation services across the country Footing the Bill We believe that the bill for this should be picked up by the tobacco companies themselves who have been the architects of an epidemic which has had a devastating financial and social burden on this country in addition to the almost overwhelming loss of life The continued profitability of the tobacco industry and the harm caused by a product which kills up to two in three long term smokers are entirely inseparable It is

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/06/10/smoking-still-kills-thats-why-were-committed-to-a-strategy-to-tackle-tobacco/comment-page-1/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Cancer and Infections - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Fran Balkwill Professor Andrew Biankin See all researchers More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Series Cancer and Infections Series Cancer and Infections HPV the whole story warts and all Category Science blog September 16 2014 Emma Smith This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections In the latest instalment of our cancer and infections series we explore the history behind the cancer causing human papillomavirus Read More Epstein Barr virus and the immune system are cures in sight Category Science blog April 9 2014 Emma Smith This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections Concluding our story on Epstein Barr virus and cancer we explore the ongoing research into the virus and how this could lead to treatments in the future Read More 50 years of Epstein Barr virus Category Science blog March 26 2014 Emma Smith This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections 50 years ago three scientists published their findings on the first human virus that can cause cancer read the story of Epstein Barr virus Read More A bug s life H pylori and stomach cancer Category Science blog March 7 2014 Emma Smith This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections In the next in our Cancer and Infections series we look at the stomach bug H pylori and how it s linked with cancer Read More The link between cancer and infections Category Science blog February 26 2014 Emma Smith This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections Can you catch cancer The answer is no but you can pick up an infection that increases the chances of developing certain types Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer Processed meat and cancer what you need to

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/series/cancer-and-infections/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Marking the frontlines in the global war on cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    claiming that nothing has changed and that millions of research dollars have achieved nothing Yet things have improved albeit not as fast as all of us would like and certainly not on a global scale From losing to gaining When Bailar revisited his analysis of the War on Cancer in 1997 the conclusions were still grim Although survival for more types of cancer was starting to improve measurably in the US any gains were overwhelmed by surging lung cancer rates thanks to the smoking boom earlier in the 20th century But again the picture has changed over recent years and survival has climbed consistently in many countries since the mid 1990s In many parts of the world your chances of beating cancer today are better than they have ever been This improvement has been driven by researchers all over the globe finding new ways of diagnosing cancer earlier visualising it within the body and treating it with surgery radiotherapy chemotherapy and other approaches In the UK alone advances in research have saved more than half a million lives over recent decades Despite this progress the statistics are stark More than 12 million people are diagnosed with cancer every year worldwide and the disease accounts for more than 15 percent of annual global deaths claiming more than 7 5 million lives And ironically while advances in public health have helped to reduce deaths from infectious diseases in poorer countries cancer is a growing spectre in these parts of the world Read the rest over at Al Jazeera Online Image from Wikimedia Commons Share this article More on this topic Tags Causes of cancer Policy Preventing cancer Research and trials Statistics Treatment Comments Click here to cancel reply miK September 12 2013 Dear Dr Kat Thank you for the link to clinicaltrials gov I was questioning because I came to trial link through an article from 2006 and it s still up gov link shows that it s been going since 2009 and schedule to finish in Dec 2013 3 months away It s strange that they couldn t get 30 people all this time Seeing how end is so near I think I ll skip on this one But the idea is interesting reminding me of Dr Steinman s research posthumous nobel prize winner although I don t know how they ll tackle recipient rejection and cancer mutations Along similar lines thank you for nice write up on GcMAF that s how I found your blog Sadly it seems that stuff is taking on homeopathic proportions to cancer patients due to hype even here in US I wonder if follow up is in order not necessarily by you that s asking too much but with more recent data on in efficacy celia September 12 2013 I think its heart breaking that so many people are dying from cancer and maybe driven to take part in these sort of trails If the drugs companies were looking for cures and not expensive treatments

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2013/09/09/marking-the-frontlines-in-the-global-war-on-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
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  • A bug’s life: H. pylori and stomach cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    In the 70s Columbian scientist Pelayo Correa studied large groups of people in South America He noticed that stomach cancer developed in a multi step process which began with years of chronic stomach inflammation Soon researchers were putting two and two together if H pylori infection was the main cause of stomach ulcers and chronic inflammation and inflammation a pre cursor to stomach cancer then it stood to reason that infection with the bugs could be a leading cause of cancer It was a neat idea but someone had to prove it Our researchers joined the dots The first indications of a link between H pylori and stomach cancer came from scientists who spotted that rates of the disease were highest where infection was rife But these studies were small and were not enough to prove that the bacteria were the true culprit In 1990 we funded a large observational study of people called an epidemiological study run by Professor David Forman To prove a link between a risk factor and cancer you usually need to collect information from large numbers of people so Forman looked to the East and one of the biggest countries in the world where H pylori infection was commonplace China Forman tested blood samples for signs of H pylori infection from men of all different ages from 46 regions across rural China ranging from areas of high and low rates of stomach cancer He then matched the blood samples to records of causes of death kept by the health registries When he compared how many men died from different types of cancer to whether they were infected with the stomach bacteria the only cancer related cause of death that was more common in the group of infected men was stomach cancer This was the first wide scale study confirming a link between H pylori and stomach cancer It was also the first time a bacterial infection had been shown to increase the risk of getting cancer A simple fix In developed countries the numbers of people diagnosed with stomach cancer have steadily fallen since the early 1900s In the UK alone the number of cases of stomach cancer has halved in the last 30 years There are several reasons for this including a drop in the number of people infected with H pylori Improved sanitation less overcrowded living conditions and wide scale use of antibiotics have all played a role in reducing the number of people infected with H pylori and so lowered stomach cancer rates Other changes that have also contributed to this fall in stomach cancer rates are lifestyle related The introduction of refrigeration helped keep food fresh and germ free for longer and cut the use of salting to preserve food high levels of salt in the diet are also a risk factor Generally an overall improvement in our diet has helped lower the number of people being diagnosed with this disease But stomach cancer is the second biggest cause of cancer

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/03/07/a-bugs-life-h-pylori-and-stomach-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
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