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  • In memory - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic In memory Topic In memory A tribute to Professor Alan Clarke Category Science blog January 7 2016 Cancer Research UK We were shocked and saddened to hear of the sudden and untimely passing of Professor Alan Clarke who died while walking his dog shortly after Christmas Read More A tribute to Professor Jane Wardle Category Science blog October 23 2015 Sara Hiom This week we lost a dear friend a colleague a mentor and exceptionally talented researcher Jane Wardle one of the UK s leading health psychologists Read More A tribute to Professor Julian Lewis Category Science blog May 2 2014 Sarah Hazell We pay tribute to Professor Julian Lewis an inspirational scientist and mentor who sadly passed away this week Read More A tribute to Anne Szarewski Category Science blog September 2 2013 Peter Sasieni In tribute to Anne Szarewski we look at her career and the huge contribution she made to our understanding of the links between HPV and cancer Read More A tribute to Joan Austoker Category Science blog January 28 2010 Lesley Walker

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/in-memory/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Inequality - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Inequality Topic Inequality The end of the road trying to unpick the problems with end of life care Category Science blog August 7 2015 Misha Gajewski We take a critical look at the issues facing end of life care in the UK and what s being done to resolve them Read More The gap between rich and poor yet more misleading information from the tobacco industry Category Science blog January 20 2015 Dan Hunt We discuss a recent report showing how the tobacco industry has misrepresented scientific evidence on health inequalities to the Government Read More Guest post Are older cancer patients missing out on surgery Category Science blog December 5 2014 Henry Scowcroft John Butler is a Consultant Gynaecologist at the Royal Marsden Hospital Here he gives us his thoughts on new data on surgery in the NHS Read More Why is economic inequality linked to 19 000 cancer deaths a year Category Science blog May 29 2014 Henry Scowcroft A new report links social inequality to more than 15 000 extra cases of cancer each year and even more alarmingly more than 19 000 extra deaths Read More Ten things politicians should do to help beat cancer Category Science blog May 21 2014 Sara Osborne Ahead of the 2015 General Election we ve compiled a list of 10 recommendations for action we think the next government should focus on to help beat cancer Read More NCRI conference session global inequalities in cancer Category Science blog November 12 2012 Jess Kirby Despite common mis conception that cancer is a modern disease of Western society which we ve discussed here well over half of the world s cancer d Read More Kate Pickett on the nation s health why can t we close the gap between rich and poor Category Science blog September 21 2010 Henry Scowcroft Professor Kate Pickett is a Cancer Research UK funded health researcher and co author of The Spirit Level In this guest blog post she discusses the latest Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/policy/inequality/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Breastfeeding - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    See all researchers More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Breastfeeding Topic Breastfeeding Breastfeeding does not cause cancer quite the opposite Category Science blog April 29 2014 Henry Scowcroft Amidst widespread coverage of today s survival story we were concerned to spot an error in a newspaper graphic suggesting that breastfeeding caused cancer Read More The causes of cancer you can control Category Science blog December 7 2011 Jess Kirby Can cancer be prevented Decades of research have shown that a person s chances of getting cancer depends on a mishmash of their genes and their environment Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer Processed meat and

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/cancer-prevention/breastfeeding/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Stem cells - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Stem cells Topic Stem cells Eye gene acts as partner in crime in leukaemia mystery case Category Science blog September 14 2015 Cancer Research UK Our scientists have solved the mystery of why a gene involved in human eye development may also play a role in an aggressive form of blood cancer Read More Pint of Science 2015 from cows to cancer clinical trials Category Science blog May 1 2015 Nick Peel Fancy hearing about the latest developments in cancer research Well some of our scientists might be gathering in a venue near you to tell all Read More Producing new blood cells why reading the recipe matters Category Science blog October 16 2014 Aine McCarthy From Bake Off to the immune system we explore exciting new research that shows why following the genetic recipe is crucial for producing normal blood cells Read More Botox for stomach cancer No but the research is fascinating Category Science blog August 22 2014 Henry Scowcroft We take a look at science behind widespread but overblown media reports that Botox could be used to treat stomach cancer Read More From lab coats to Lycra Oxford researchers run Race for Life Category Science blog July 1 2013 Metta Pratt As a first year PhD student I can usually be found slaving away at the bench and looking after my fruit flies But lately I ve been leaving my natural habit Read More Tracing the roots of breast cancer Category Science blog February 19 2013 Emma Smith Our bodies are made of hundreds of different types of cells And when processes inside them go wrong and allow them to keep dividing uncontrollably cancers fo Read More Notes from the NCRI conference day 3 Category Science blog November 6 2012 Henry Scowcroft It s been another packed day at the NCRI conference full of interesting discussion and debate as were yesterday s and Sunday s sessions But before we Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/research-and-trials/cancer-biology/stem-cells/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Tumour metabolism - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    all researchers More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Tumour metabolism Topic Tumour metabolism This switches the lights on how discovering the shape of three proteins could lead to new cancer drugs Category Science blog August 8 2015 Nick Peel An important new study has revealed the shape of three key proteins and the results could help scientists working on new cancer drugs Read More Chocolate detects cancer headlines are misleading Category Science blog July 9 2013 Kat Arney Newspaper headlines making elevated claims about chocolate and cancer misrepresent the research find out what the scientists really showed Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer Processed meat

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/research-and-trials/cancer-biology/tumour-metabolism/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Patient care - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Topic Patient care Topic Patient care The end of the road trying to unpick the problems with end of life care Category Science blog August 7 2015 Misha Gajewski We take a critical look at the issues facing end of life care in the UK and what s being done to resolve them Read More Laughing helps you get through it Rowena s story Category Science blog July 21 2015 Cancer Research UK Rowena Kincaid gives Cancer Research UK an exclusive look into what she learned while making her documentary Before I Kick the Bucket for BBC Wales Read More The Patient Portal putting information back in patients hands Category Science blog June 10 2015 Laura Smith We re helping to offer cancer patients easy access to their online treatment records but what do patients think of it Read More Advice on being active should be routine in bowel cancer care Category Science blog April 29 2015 Dr Abi Fisher Dr Abi Fisher from our UCL Health Behaviour Research Centre blogs about her recent paper looking at physical activity rates in people with bowel cancer Read More The National Cancer Patient Experience Survey a patient writes Category Science blog February 6 2015 Richard Stephens A personal take on the findings of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey from Richard Stephens who survived Hodgkin s lymphoma 15 years ago Read More NCRI 2014 conference summary day 2 Category Science blog November 4 2014 Nick Peel Here s our round up from day two of the NCRI cancer conference in Liverpool Read More The Cancer Patient Experience Survey questions have been asked now what Category Science blog September 25 2014 Sara Bainbridge It may seem as though we re constantly asked to give feedback but what s more important is knowing what s happened as a result of our comments Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/topic/cancer-treatment/patient-care/ (2016-02-11)
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  • World Health Organisation verdict on mobile phones and cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    no effect If it s above or below the line this suggests that phones might increase or reduce the risk of cancer respectively The bars above and below the dot are important they represent the confidence interval which indicates how reliable the result is If the bars cross the horizontal line this means the result is not statistically significant It could have been down to chance or bias As you can see only one study out of 14 found the mobile phones significantly affect the risk of cancer The dot that s second from the right labelled pooled estimate represents the combined results from all the studies Again you can see that it s pretty much sitting on the line which suggests that mobile phones do not affect the risk of cancer click to enlarge Some studies have suggested that people have a higher risk of brain cancer specifically on the side of the head that they say they hold their phones to However many of these studies have also reported either no overall increased risk of cancer or a lower risk of tumours on the other side of the head Scientists disagree as to whether this side of head effect is real If phones were really increasing the risk of brain cancer on one side of the head you would still expect to see this reflected in the overall result Alternatively the result could be due to bias because people inaccurately remembered how they used their phones see below Nor is it clear if people actually hold their phones consistently to one side of their heads What are the weaknesses of these studies All the existing studies suffer from similar problems Changing technology Mobile phone technology has also changed considerably over the last decades and it is not clear if studies based on use of old models will apply to modern ones Assessment problems There still are no clear ways of assessing someone s actual exposure to mobile phone radiation Instead studies use questionnaires to work out whether and how people use mobile phones These questionnaires rely on people accurately remembering their past mobile phone use years or decades ago In some of the Hardell studies a third of patients received help from relatives in completing the questionnaires compared to just one in ten controls In one case the next of kin of deceased patients estimated how often their loved ones used their phones Recall bias It s not clear if the replies to these questionnaires are accurate a problem known as recall bias Answers might be biased because people have heard about mobiles and brain cancer in the media because brain cancer can distort memory or simply because people misremember things that happened a long time ago The individual studies have drawn more specific criticisms The Danish study relied on subscriber records instead of questionnaires However there are concerns that subscribers aren t always the ones who use the phones and that this method excludes corporate users who could use their phones heavily For example the InterPhone study has been criticized for using unrealistic definition of regular users and having low response rates to its questionnaires The authors have also disagreed as to how their results should be interpreted The Hardell group has been criticised for publishing the same data in multiple papers inconsistently reporting data such as sample sizes and having implausibly high response rates to its questionnaires The abstracts of their papers often highlight statistically significant links in very specific groups of people while ignoring overall negative results These types of analyses are difficult to interpret if you split a sample far enough you end up with small numbers of people in each group and greater odds of finding a positive result simply through chance Are there conflicts of interest The mobile phone industry has provided funding for the InterPhone study and the Danish study In both cases funds have been administered through independent third party organisations that are meant to act as firewalls to ensure the independence of the scientists InterPhone for example received 19 2 million euros of funding 5 5 million of this total came from industry sources and was either administered through the International Union for Cancer Control or collected via taxes and fees from government agencies Lennart Hardell has not received funding from industry sources but has appeared as an expert witness in litigation cases involving mobile phones Could mobile phones cause cancer This is an important question Scientists are confident that tobacco alcohol or asbestos can cause cancer because they can explain how these things affect the way our cells work These explanations are called biological mechanisms they play a vital role in establishing that something causes cancer So far no one has been able to provide a good biological mechanism for the link between mobile phones and cancer The how question is an open one The phones give off microwave radiation but this has millions of times less energy than say an X ray and is not powerful enough to damage our DNA They mildly heat the body but again not enough to pose a health risk Other suggestions have been put forward but none are backed by consistent evidence Are brain cancer rates going up If mobile phones increase the risk of brain cancer the rates of this disease should be skyrocketing since mobile phone use has risen dramatically over the last few decades But studies in the US New Zealand Denmark Norway Sweden and Finland have found no such trends In the UK the incidence of brain cancer has been flat for the past few decades A recent English study concluded that the increased use of mobile phones between 1985 and 2003 has not led to a noticeable change in the incidence of brain cancer in England between 1998 and 2007 Brain cancers can take many years to develop so it is possible that trends would only start rising after more time What about base stations Base

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2011/05/31/who-verdict-on-mobile-phones-and-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Expert opinion: aspirin and cancer – the unanswered questions - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    develops In particular in order to stop cancer developing we believe aspirin must be taken at a very early stage in cancer s development before it becomes full blown cancer This prevents the small groups of abnormal cells obtaining more genetic changes that will eventually become cancer We believe this takes about 10 to 15 years What has been done by Cancer Research UK in this area The trial I work on AspECT was specifically designed to measure rates of oesophageal cancer bowel cancer and deaths from heart disease The trial is split into four groups people only given a low dose proton pump inhibitor people only given a high dose proton pump inhibitor people given a low dose proton pump inhibitor with 300mg aspirin people given a high dose proton pump inhibitor with 300mg aspirin To date the team behind the trial haven t revealed any obvious differences between these four groups While we strongly endorse this recent study much caution is needed The study looked at trials that focused on heart disease rather than cancer and that might have biased the results For example the number of deaths from cancer of the digestive system was just 182 out of almost 20 000 patients There were only 23 deaths from oesophageal cancer That s a very small number to be trying to draw firm conclusions from Patients on these trials especially those who were taking aspirin might also have had medical complications that resulted in them being diagnosed at an earlier stage when cancers are easier to treat successfully In short before making any broad recommendations we need trials like AspECT to report their findings AspECT s preliminary data will be available in 2012 These will cover issues of risk benefit genetic stratification for response dose and length of therapy and should go a long way towards answering these crucial questions Janusz Jankowski Reference Rothwell P Fowkes F Belch J Ogawa H Warlow C Meade T 2010 Effect of daily aspirin on long term risk of death due to cancer analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials The Lancet DOI 10 1016 S0140 6736 10 62110 1 Share this article More on this topic Tags Bowel cancer Cancer in the news Oesophageal cancer Preventing cancer Comments Click here to cancel reply Brian Shrimplin February 7 2011 Just a quick point on Jim s comment as I understand it Aspirin does not actually Thin the blood it makes it less glutinous or sticky This helps to prevent it building and blocking up small Arterial walls Etc Jim Sumner February 4 2011 About 20 years ago I was advised to take 75mg of soluble asprin per day to keep my blood thin This I have done I am 80 and I have had no ill effects so far Each time new research advises asprin to prevent this and that I feel quite pleased as I m already taking it I have no other medication so hey here s to the

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2010/12/07/expert-opinion-aspirin-and-cancer-the-unanswered-questions/ (2016-02-11)
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