archive-org.com » ORG » C » CANCERRESEARCHUK.ORG

Total: 768

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Radiotherapy: our vision for the next ten years - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    the aim is to hit the tumour but avoid the healthy surrounding cells To do this the people giving the treatment need to be able to know what they re targeting they need imaging technology that allows them to see the tumour This already happens and is called Image Guided Radiotherapy IGRT but there are still big improvements to be made Some of the most exciting developments in radiotherapy technology in the next 10 years will come from improvements in imaging In particular combination technologies where imaging equipment is combined with the machines used to give radiotherapy linear accelerators will mean that radiographers will be able to see the parts of the body they are treating as they are treating them This means that they will be able to more accurately target a lung cancer tumour that moves as a patient breathes and even see how a tumour reacts to treatment in real time This opens up possibilities for more sophisticated and personalised treatments Data using what we already know Radiotherapy centres generate a huge range of information about the people they re treating and what results they re getting We need to make better use of this data to answer some of the key questions we still have about radiotherapy Before a patient is treated we have certain pieces of information about them for example their general health and the kind of tumour they have Then they re given radiotherapy and we record how they respond to this whether they recover well what kind of side effects they have If we link these sets of information together we can start to observe patterns and make predictions If we use the data we already have properly when a patient is diagnosed they are not approached as an isolated case The medical team treating them will have access to information about the people who came before them They will compare and contrast new patients with old and so will be able to make more informed decisions about how they should treat each individual We already have vast amounts of data it s time we started working out what it s telling us Research looking into the future The progress that s been made over recent years in radiotherapy has been fantastic We want to make sure that the next 10 years are even better And there s only one way to ensure that we are continually improving research Our report looks at a range of ways we can encourage research in radiotherapy from better collaboration between centres to ensuring that staff have the training and resources that they need Crucially we need to make sure that when we get results from research the NHS is in a position to adopt these quickly Historically this hasn t always happened The NHS has been slow to make the most of intensity modulated radiotherapy IMRT a type of radiotherapy that targets the tumour more accurately sparing the healthy tissue meaning that for some time

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/03/03/radiotherapy-our-vision-for-the-next-ten-years/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive


  • The NHS reforms – are they affecting cancer care? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    and Social Care Act PCTs and SHAs are being replaced with local Clinical Commissioning Groups known as CCGs effectively giving doctors a far more prominent role in commissioning than before Overseeing things is the new NHS Commissioning Board which will have regional and local offices to liaise with local CCGs see diagram left In addition to taking over PCTs budgets CCGs who will ultimately be in charge of about 80 per cent of the entire NHS budget will buy services from any qualified i e suitable provider as well as their local hospitals The idea is to make the NHS much more agile and more responsive to the needs of local communities And on top of this the Cancer Networks are to be replaced by 12 Strategic Clinical Networks who will have some cancer expertise We ve blogged in depth about these reforms here s our initial reaction to them our thoughts on how they could affect cancer care our concerns about ensuring a successful transition our work persuading the NHS Commissioning Board to bear cancer related issues in mind and the ultimate publication of and our reaction to the Commissioning Board s Mandate But we haven t had any hard data on whether or how the reforms are affecting things on the ground until now The numbers The first thing to say is that we re hugely relieved the report shows that waiting times for most cancer related measures holding up and even improving over the last few years This must be seen in context of the huge improvements in cancer care over the last decade things really have got better especially under the leadership of Professor Sir Mike Richards National Cancer Director at the Department of Health The report shows that in recent years the NHS has been carrying out more diagnostic tests for cancer But although the proportion of people waiting more than six weeks for access to them has fluctuated including an increase during 2010 11 for most services this is currently back to normal The only cause for concern is endoscopy where waiting times increased in 2010 11 and haven t yet returned to their previous level A similar picture emerged among suspected cancer patients referred for further investigation Patient numbers have increased but waiting times have held up and in many cases even improved This is a huge testament to the staff working across the NHS who appear to be carrying on their excellent work as normal But one worrying figure did emerge in the Birmingham report the proportion of NHS money spent on cancer has dropped in real terms As the graph shows over 2008 9 the cancer budget grew by 2 9 per cent In 2009 10 it grew by 11 2 per cent But in 2010 12 it shrank by 2 6 per cent Given the increase in cancer cases expected as the UK population ages this is potentially a problem The reaction from staff The picture painted in the interviews

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/12/15/the-nhs-reforms-are-they-affecting-cancer-care/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Our Local Cancer Statistics website – who is it for and what can it tell them? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    openly available but the big challenge is to make sense of it and present it clearly so politicians healthcare providers doctors and patients can make informed and effective decisions Our main aim with the Local Cancer Statistics website is to turn raw data into intelligence that can drive such decisions It brings together publicly available data to help make sense of the vast pile of figures out there giving a helpful snapshot of cancer and its associated issues It s also possible to compare statistics between local areas and the national average A snapshot below from the portal shows for example lung cancer incidence rates and smoking rates are higher in Liverpool than the national average Rate of lung cancer cases in Liverpool Primary Care Trust Smoking rates in Liverpool Local Authority People can search the data by local geography in each country in the UK for example by local authority health care area constituency or postcode You can look at rates of cancer incidence how many people get cancer in the population deaths and survival screening uptake and where how and when people are diagnosed with cancer There are also smoking related statistics which is the single biggest preventable risk factor for cancer In the future we hope to add more data to explore such as information about treatments for certain cancers and patients experiences of their care and figures on other important lifestyle factors that pose a risk Primarily aimed at politicians local officials doctors and anyone else who makes decisions about cancer services we hope that the data will be a useful resource We ve tried to present the data in a relevant and easy to understand way which will save time for busy people For example we know that politicians want to be able to rapidly get a picture of the status of cancer in the patch they represent We re constantly looking to improve the site and if you have any suggestions on how we can make the site better for you please contact us Why do we need it Locally available data is ever more important with the localisation of decision making for many cancer and public health services due to the recent NHS reforms It s clear from the data that there is variation in cancer statistics across the UK This can sometimes lead to finger pointing at health care providers in areas with worse outcomes and trigger the familiar postcode lottery for health care headlines in the media But this is often unfair and unhelpful and good quality data can reveal why For example higher cancer death rates do not necessarily mean that treatment or access to cancer care is worse in these areas Differences in getting cancer and dying from cancer are often related to underlying variations in risk due to differing lifestyles and socio economic factors as highlighted in this BBC story More than four in ten cases of cancer could be prevented by changes to lifestyle such as not

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2013/10/30/our-local-cancer-statistics-website-who-is-it-for-and-what-can-it-tell-them/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • EU regulation may shut down vital research and cost lives - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    what external factors affect the likelihood of people getting ill and what combinations of treatment are most effective Such information is a by product of the work the NHS would be doing anyway but these by products have the potential to address our most fundamental questions what causes cancer how do we spot it and how do we cure it There are answers in the data Health records are incredibly valuable and the lifeblood of research Our National Health Service means that we have some of the most comprehensive long term high quality health data in the world What s the problem In certain limited circumstances researchers can currently access identifiable data which still includes information such as NHS number date of birth and postcode without individual consent In order to do this they must pass through a stringent ethical process and are subject to robust rules about how they handle the data Individuals who do not want their data used in this way also have the right to object The European Data Protection Regulation in its current form will make all of this impossible Why would researchers need to access such data Firstly such access isn t common In the majority of cases researchers ask for consent from patients or use anonymous data which cannot be linked back to the original patient But for certain types of research this isn t enough More information is needed to help reach a valid scientific conclusion Often a researcher will need to look at a large group of people over a long period of time so seeking consent from each individual becomes impractical The researcher will never meet or know the names of the patients whose records they re looking at but those patients are essential to the success of their research For example the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership ICBP is a unique international partnership which is looking at variation in cancer survival between countries We know that the UK doesn t have the best survival in the world but we don t completely know why This is the key question which the ICBP is addressing The ICBP relies on high precision data because in order to compare ourselves to other countries we need a detailed understanding of what is going on here The answers the ICBP is giving us will help decide approaches to cancer treatment and policy in the future so that we can save the most lives possible But the proposed regulation is threatening the data sources which are the foundation of studies like this Identifiable data is also used to find people who can be invited to take part in clinical trials Often patients are told about trials by their doctor But what about trials which require healthy patients for example screening trials The UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening is investigating the possibility of screening for ovarian cancer More than 4 000 women die from this disease each year and we know that the earlier cancer

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2013/12/06/eu-regulation-may-shut-down-vital-research-and-cost-lives/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Jumping the queue: could pharmacists help spot cancer? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    them having to wait for a GP appointment Pharmacists can identify and engage with people at a point when they wouldn t consult their GP Rebecca Taylor ACE programme s lead for Pharmacy And as well as offering a new route to cancer tests the hope is that this will also identify high risk people who would not normally go to their GP As Rebecca Taylor the ACE programme s lead for Pharmacy tells us the potential benefits are clear Pharmacists can identify and engage with people at a point when they wouldn t consult their GP This could lead to earlier diagnosis of lung cancer which means that those people are more likely to be successfully treated In fact almost eight in 10 lung cancer patients 77 per cent are diagnosed at a late stage in England when the chances of long term survival are lowest only 15 per cent of these patients survive their disease for a year or more By contrast among the 14 per cent of patients diagnosed in the disease s earliest stage the proportion alive a year later raises to 71 per cent So if pharmacists can spot people who might not see a GP until their symptoms become advanced it might make a dent in these gloomy statistics This isn t the first time this idea has been tested a shorter 12 week study was carried out in South West London in 2011 2012 Although it didn t find any people with lung cancer it did help diagnose a number of people with other chronic lung conditions including previously undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease COPD The Doncaster project will run for much longer 12 months giving it the potential to reach around 68 000 people Is it feasible Despite the possibility of diagnosing cancers earlier some have reservations about the idea One concern is that since they don t have the same clinical training as GPs pharmacists won t refer the right people putting extra pressure on an overstretched NHS and leading to people having X rays they don t need But as Dr Marco Pieri the GP leading the Doncaster Project points out You don t need an in depth understanding of lung disease to refer appropriately Both pharmacists and counter staff taking part in the Doncaster pilot have had extra training the latter focusing on the signs and symptoms of the disease to help identify those who should be referred while the former focusing on the referral process itself and the implications of unnecessary X rays We already have some clinical training and make decisions that will make a difference for patients on a daily basis Tosin Sule a pharmacist at Boots On top of this some potential lung cancer symptoms are easy to spot Having a cough for longer than 3 weeks is key says Dr Pieri And pharmacists themselves are also confident they can do the job as they are already trained to give other similar forms of medical

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/10/22/jumping-the-queue-could-pharmacists-help-spot-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Two years on for our pioneering TRACERx lung cancer study - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    with early stage non small cell lung cancer taking regular blood samples and scans over five years It s a vital project Terrence was luckily diagnosed early but lung cancer is often diagnosed late when it s already spread So compared with other common forms of cancer relatively little is known about how it develops TRACERx aims to throw pretty much every modern monitoring technique at its participants in an effort to understand their disease and ultimately use this knowledge to help others And Terrence is taking part The day before my operation I was asked if I wanted to take part in a study They explained that they d track me either with a scan or a blood sample every three months for the next five years he says It s brilliant Being regularly monitored by one of the biggest cancer research organisations in the world it s like winning the lottery Terrence s operation went well all signs of cancer were removed and there didn t seem to be any in his lymph nodes He s now cancer free and still being monitored by the TRACERx team I m trying to enjoy life even more now because I think we ve had a near miss haven t we he says Evolving tumours evolving studies TRACERx is now in its second full year So how have things progressed It s been hard work says Cancer Research UK s Professor Charles Swanton the driving force behind the project which involves six hospitals across the UK and almost as many research centres With so many aspects to the study it s been tough co ordinating things across so many centres and been a lot harder than I thought But it s going really well The study has now recruited nearly 200 patients just under a quarter of the overall target And alongside all the original plans for DNA analysis which we wrote about when the trial launched Swanton s team have opened up several new fronts Co ordinating things has been tough a lot harder than I thought Professor Charles Swanton We re now collaborating with a lab in the US at the Dana Farber Cancer Center says Swanton who recently moved with his team to the new Francis Crick Institute in London An imaging team there lead by Hugo Aerts is looking at whether scans from TRACERx participants show anything that relates to the degree of genetic chaos we re measuring in their tumour samples The aim he says is to develop a much easier less invasive way to understand a patient s disease than relatively costly DNA analysis And we ve also linked up with a lab at The Institute of Cancer Research in London led by Yinyin Yuan he says They ll be looking at tumour samples from TRACERx to see if the interaction between a tumour and its surrounding neighbourhood known as the tumour microenvironment also holds clues that could be exploited New trials In another significant

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/09/02/two-years-on-for-our-pioneering-tracerx-lung-cancer-study/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ‘Having cancer makes my work even more meaningful’ – Emma’s story - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    heartbreaking This time the treatment was more complex and even more painful I had an eight hour operation to remove a large section of my tongue which was then replaced with a graft from my forearm I needed a tube in my neck so I could breathe and another tube to eat The treatment was awful The whole thing was so painful and really unpleasant I even had to learn how to talk again This time was the hardest and not just because of the treatment I couldn t see my son Jamie the whole time I was in hospital he was nearly two years old so it would have been too hard for him to see me like that Thankfully I did get to see Isobel she was too young to fully understand what was happening Seeing her really got me back on my feet I wanted to spend more time with them have more time as a family I had to get better for them and for myself My parents were amazing each time I was diagnosed but particularly the fourth time They moved in to the family home for a couple of months to help with David and the kids and everything they were an invaluable support When I left the hospital after my reconstruction operation my fifth in total I was so emotional It felt like I d been released from jail I took everything in from the blue sky to the green grass and cuddled the kids I m grateful that I can enjoy the simple things in life now like seeing Jamie and Isobel feed the animals on our farm It s amazing what doctors can do and how far we ve come in treating cancer And despite how hard my treatment was I feel lucky to be alive Research saved me I ve been told there is a less than three per cent chance of the cancer returning so I m hopeful I ve beaten the disease I may have had cancer four times but it won t define me One of the good things to come out of this whole thing is that I m now more confident as a person Previously I used to get nervous before giving a presentation but now I remind myself that I didn t go through all that treatment just to stand up and be scared of a little talk And I m actively trying to increase awareness of the signs and symptoms of oral cancer and give people an idea of what it s like to go through cancer by giving presentations to students and GPs about my experience Working in cancer research is a really fulfilling career And because someone else s research saved me I want to help save others Having cancer makes my work even more meaningful and I m even more motivated to find better smarter ways of treating cancer now My goal is to see something we find at the Beatson used to treat oral cancer patients Emma Share this article More on this topic Tags Mouth cancer Surgery Comments Click here to cancel reply Tell us what you think Required Name Email will not be shown Required Website Read our comment policy Submit Comment Joan August 28 2015 Hi Emma thank you for sharing your very emotional story I lost my husband of 40 years to cancer 9 years ago Keep healthy and happy enjoy life to the full with you family Victoria August 27 2015 I m a university student studying cancer biology and microbiology stories like this help to inspire me in my course David August 27 2015 Great to know how important research is Keep fund raising folks Nic August 27 2015 an excellent thought provoking story i am currently being treated for thyroid cancer and stories such as this give me great hope Martine August 27 2015 Hi Emma Thank you for sharing your story and well done I wish you all the best in everything you do Live long and be happy Alan Brown August 27 2015 Congratulations to you Emma You deserve success I lost a loving wife to cancer in 2010 I find it difficult to live without her Also I find it difficult to live alone even as a pensioner You are providing a service to many persons All the best to you and I trust that you have a long and happy life Lesley Bigmore August 27 2015 Hi Emma Thank you so much for sharing your blog you have been through so much for someone so young Its people like yourself that I admire so much I am sure one day we will find a cure for this dreadful disease Love to you and your family xx Jenny August 27 2015 Emma you are an incredible lady thank you for sharing your story you bring hope to everyone through your determination Enjoy every day you deserve it I have many friends who have survived cancer and unfortunately some who have not but through research we are beating this disease Bijaya Luxmi Rai August 27 2015 This story is a big inspiration to those with oral cancer I was diagnosed oral cancer 4 years ago and I had big surgery done in Bloomfield hospital with skin graft in my tongue and mandible replacement I have to learn to speak as well Now I feel more better and cancer free Hope it does not come back again Thanks to my doctors and medical team who made my surgery successful Thanks to God Sarah Hopkins August 27 2015 What an amazing lady I am totally moved by her determination and strength to go through that I can t imagine that I would be so strong Jane August 26 2015 What an amazing account I m so pleased for you that you are well again and back with your family once more Audrey August 26 2015 I can only echo all the warmth

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/08/14/having-cancer-makes-my-work-even-more-meaningful-emmas-story/comment-page-2/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Andrew Biankin: We need a "We can do this!" attitude to pancreatic cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    out how genetic variations are linked to response to therapy And that s what brought him all the way to the other side of the world to Glasgow Assembling a top team We re now hunting for new targets for treatments working closely with colleagues at the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute to develop new ideas into potential future therapies or even use existing drugs in a better way he says And it s this proximity having basic scientific researchers so close to the patients in the clinic that made the UK such an attractive place to move Obviously it wasn t the weather that drew me here he quips The critical mass here is amazing and we re recruiting from all over the world More and more people are starting to work on pancreatic cancer using the lab models we ve created from samples taken from patients tumours A recent addition to the Glasgow team has been DNA technology guru Grimmond who s setting up a new DNA analysis facility to mimic the set up back in Sydney And access to local hospitals is vital for providing tumour samples and clinical information about how well patients are doing It s great being able to work within the NHS more generally the NHS is fantastic for doing this kind of research But in Biankin s view there needs to be a complete shift in how the health service views pancreatic cancer A clinical emergency We need to treat pancreatic cancer as a clinical emergency Someone with a diagnosis should be fast tracked through a rapid assessment and into treatments or a clinical trial he says Someone with a diagnosis should be fast tracked through a rapid assessment and into treatments or a clinical trial Professor Biankin With other types of cancer that are slower growing it might be OK not to rush it and wait a week or so for a scan But with pancreatic cancer you want to get all the information in front of you as soon as possible One big problem is that the disease progresses rapidly and has multiple effects on the body such as wasting and fatigue known as cachexia so many patients don t get any therapy at all as they re too sick to handle it Faster diagnosis and assessment could give every patient the best opportunity not only to get therapy but also to get on a clinical trial Everyone should have the opportunity to be on a trial Biankin points out as what we re doing now to treat them really doesn t work We need to hit the disease hard and fast with new approaches right now we don t truly have a standard of care The drugs we do have probably work in a handful of people and we don t know who so we give them to everybody And we must get the patients involved as well get them to understand the cancer more when they get diagnosed and give them the option of trying the latest therapies in a clinical trial setting But that means being faster in clinical systems to get to that point including taking tumour samples and discussing with the patient about what s on offer We need to get that worked out within two to three weeks rather than four to six weeks he says Into the future Despite these frustrations Biankin is optimistic about where all this could lead and points to promise of matching patients individual cancers to the new generation of targeted cancer treatments What I d like to see even within a year s time is a UK wide clinical trial like Cancer Research UK s Lung Matrix Trial where we take samples from patients tumours run genetic tests on them and then give them appropriate targeted drugs We d also like to take more tumour samples if the cancer comes back to see how it s changed he says something that will allow them to go back to the lab and do further investigation into possible treatments In five to 10 years he hopes that this will lead to therapies that work at least in a subgroup of patients and to begin to understand how pancreatic tumours evolve in the body and develop resistance to treatment Even if we can just use the drugs that we already have in better ways I would anticipate that we could make a significant step forward At the moment says Biankin there s a bit of a nihilistic attitude towards pancreatic cancer treatment and research I d like to see a We can do this attitude where we try and enthuse more people to get in there and dedicate themselves to pancreatic cancer research We couldn t agree more Kat Listen to Professor Biankin discussing his research in this month s podcast Read more about our research on pancreatic cancer Genome image from Flickr CORRECTION Andrew works at the Cancer Research UK Glasgow Centre not the Beatson Institute as originally stated Share this article More on this topic Tags Biomarker research Cancer genes Cancer Research UK funded research Pancreatic cancer Comments Click here to cancel reply Kat Arney February 26 2015 Hi Ele Please call our Cancer Information Nurses on freephone 0808 800 4040 Mon Fri 9am to 5pm as they can advise you on this We also have a clinical trials database on our website here We wish the very best to you and your mum and hope everything works out Kat Ele 27 February 26 2015 My mum is currently awaiting the results of her biopsy for pancreatic cancer we have a family history as my uncle unfortunately passed away from the disease 9 years ago She has painless jaundice and a palpable gall bladder her ercp was done yesterday We get the results on Friday Can anybody recommend clinical trials that might be of benefit to her I know this is early on but I want to move fast

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/09/10/professor-andrew-biankin-pancreatic-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •