archive-org.com » ORG » C » CANCERRESEARCHUK.ORG

Total: 768

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Can healthy living really slow the ageing process? - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    regularly 6 days per week and went through a stress management programme consisting of yoga and meditation techniques The team measured the levels of a protein called telomerase in the men s white blood cells at the beginning and end of the 3 months On average telomerase levels were found to increase by 29 and this coincided with falling levels of bad cholesterol and psychological stress Why is this so important Although this is a small study the link between lifestyle and telomerase is interesting because telomerase plays a central role in both ageing and cancer Just over two weeks ago scientists published the molecular structure of a part of telomerase and we wrote about the importance of this discovery To recap briefly Every time a cell divides in two telomerase helps to re build telomeres the protective structures at the ends of chromosomes Without telomerase telomeres progressively shorten acting as a molecular timer ticking away as the cell ages When telomeres shorten beyond a certain length the cell enters a shut down mode However at this critical time the cell has no more telomeres protecting the ends of its chromosomes leading to cancer causing damage Previous work has suggested that people with shorter telomeres in their cells have a higher risk of developing certain types of cancer such as lung kidney and bladder cancer Shortened telomeres have also been linked to a worse outcome for people with cancers such as breast and bowel cancers What s more shorter telomeres are associated with an increased risk of developing other conditions such as coronary heart disease and dying at a younger age So Because the telomerase enzyme lengthens the telomeres in our cells scientists think it has the ability to slow the ageing process and help protect us from diseases such as cancer This study reinforces the idea that we can influence our own countdown timer through our behaviour as it suggests our lifestyle can affect the levels of telomerase in the cells that make up our bodies But Kat s recent post about telomerase painted a portrait of the molecule as a cancer promoter when cancer cells reactivate telomerase they bypass their molecular clock and become immortal This may seem counterintuitive longer telomeres are a good thing in healthy cells as they seems to protect us against ageing and DNA damage But in cancer cells telomerase is a bad thing Clearly there s a lot we don t know about telomeres and telomerase we need to do a lot more research before we understand how we can tip the telomerase balance in favour of healthy cells while preventing its activity in cancers What next As acknowledged by the study s authors their work is still at a very early stage only looked at a relatively small number of men and needs to be replicated in much larger trials involving proper control groups What s more the very short time frame of this study meant that it was only possible to

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2008/09/17/can-healthy-living-really-slow-the-ageing-process/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Jo Peak | Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Author Jo Peak Author Jo Peak Can healthy living really slow the ageing process Category Science blog September 17 2008 Jo Peak Most of us are aware that a healthy lifestyle is good for us it can reduce our risk of developing cancer and other diseases and even help us live longer Th Read More New hope for breast cancer patients Category Science blog August 18 2008 Jo Peak Here s another guest post by Science Information Officer Jo Peak Over the last week there s been a flurry of headlines concerning a study showing that a p Read More Finding a cure for leukaemia Category Science blog June 30 2008 Jo Peak Here s a guest post from Dr Jo Peak one of the Science Information team at Cancer Research UK about an interesting paper published recently Why is it s Read More Older Posts

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/author/peak03/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cancer screening – the difference between what people say and what they do - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    over detection that is picking up cancers that never would have done any harm and that would never have come to light if we hadn t looked for them This is something that is far from intuitive for many people and which runs counter to long standing messages about the importance of catching cancer early A recent independent review of breast screening in the UK estimated that for every woman who has her life saved by screening three women will be overdiagnosed and treated for a cancer that would never have harmed them What difference does screening make View the full infographic on our website Wanting to know whatever the cost It was striking in our survey that nearly half of the respondents said they would want to be tested to see if they had the kind of slow growing cancer that would be unlikely to cause harm in their lifetime Many experts in the field assume that if people understood about the risk of overdiagnosis particularly in the context of breast and prostate cancer they would make different decisions about screening participation Our findings suggest this might not be the case One possibility is that people don t understand that this kind of diagnosis might lead to unnecessary surgery chemotherapy or radiotherapy with all the side effects that those treatments involve Another possibility is that people have such an entrenched view of cancer as a killer that they find it difficult to conceive of having a tumour that might not need treatment and would rather have it removed even if there s no clear health benefit to doing so and if the treatment may even harm their health Opinion was spilt about the value of knowing about an incurable cancer 49 per cent of the sample would still want to know even if nothing could be done but 46 per cent would rather not know Perhaps people vary in how important it is for them to have time to plan for their death and how this weighs against the benefits of enjoying life without a cancer diagnosis Different situations Two thirds of women and almost as many men judged a person who didn t go for screening to be irresponsible which suggests that not everyone sees non attendance for cancer screening as a legitimate personal choice We continue to work on finding the best ways to communicate with the public about cancer screening so that everyone can understand the harms and benefits and make a choice about whether to take part But this study has made us realise that it might be difficult to persuade people that screening is only worthwhile for certain cancers and in certain groups It s great that the message about the potential benefits of prevention and early diagnosis is getting through but now we may need more nuanced messages so that we all understand that there are exceptions to this rule and that in some cases not being screened is a sensible decision Jo

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/02/16/cancer-screening-the-difference-between-what-people-say-and-what-they-do/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coming together in the global fight against cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    greatest in low and middle income countries with nearly 90 per cent of cases diagnosed there The speakers then highlighted a number of themes which together give a snapshot of the key ingredients required for success in global cancer initiatives Integration Integrating cancer services with existing health infrastructure is a cost effective way to achieve more according to former First Lady Laura Bush In her keynote speech she spoke about Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon The initiative aims to build upon work done in HIV AIDS to save lives from cervical and breast cancers Women who are HIV positive are 4 5 times more likely to develop cervical cancer than women who do not have the virus So as treatments continue to improve and AIDS becomes a chronic disease more women are likely to develop cervical cancer It s not about taking money from one programme to pay for another but building on what already exists to achieve more Learn from each another Fighting cancer on a global scale isn t about high income countries dictating policy to low and middle income countries according to Dr Agnes Binagwaho Rwanda s Health Minister She told the conference how despite difficulties such as a lack of trained professionals and facilities in Rwanda they have managed to achieve a stunning 93 per cent uptake rate of the HPV vaccine which prevents cervical cancer This is in contrast to the US where it s about 30 per cent showing that high income countries can also learn a lot from their low and middle income counterparts She said that optimism is essential While there is still a long way to go in Rwanda for example they don t have their own radiotherapy facilities and patients are sent abroad to receive the treatment huge progress has been made After the genocide in 1994 life expectancy was 28 Today it is 56 An astronaut speaks Astronaut Ronald J Garan Jr explained how researchers can and should collaborate across disciplines to learn from one another and avoid duplication He said that there were similarities between looking for signs of breast cancer and searching for stars in space something we ve blogged about before and that breast screening technology had benefitted from technological advances in the Hubble telescope Tailored services Professor Karen Gelmon from the University of British Columbia told us how it s also not practical to simply copy a policy from one part of the world and paste it wholesale into another It s really important to understand the needs of different communities and tailor interventions accordingly For example in some African countries training faith leaders can be an effective way to get health messages to the community Anna Schmaus Klughammer President of the One World Medical Network also highlighted the importance of ensuring that people from the local community can take over delivery of projects so that they become sustainable In her talk Laura Bush also discussed a related theme how in the US 30 years ago

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2013/02/06/coming-together-in-the-global-fight-against-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heather Walker | Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Author Heather Walker Author Heather Walker Cancer waiting time targets simply not good enough Category Science blog May 20 2015 Heather Walker Today s new cancer waiting time data are the worst since records began and paint a gloomy picture of deteriorating cancer services We take a closer look Read More Fighting FIT Scotland s pioneering change to its bowel screening programme Category Science blog February 20 2015 Heather Walker We look at an announcement by the Scottish Government to improve the way they carry out bowel screening Read More How was it for you Cancer patient experience survey published Category Science blog September 12 2013 Heather Walker From burger bars to B Bs we re encouraged to provide feedback about the many different services we use in life Such feedback helps the people providing Read More Coming together in the global fight against cancer Category Science blog February 6 2013 Heather Walker What do an astronaut a former First Lady and a CSI Miami actress have in common They were all speakers at Monday s Global Summit on Women s Cancers held Read More Health Committee report we need decisions on cancer drugs Category Science blog January 16 2013 Heather Walker Today the Health Committee a cross party group of MPs appointed to scrutinise the Department of Health s policies published a report on its inqu Read More Abiraterone available across the UK finally Category Science blog August 13 2012 Heather Walker We re delighted with today s news that abiraterone will be available on the NHS in Scotland for men with advanced prostate cancer who ve already had Read More A look back on the Year of Radiotherapy Category Science blog January 4 2012 Heather Walker As 2011 drew to a close so too did the Year of Radiotherapy The aim of the Year which we ve blogged about before was to improve public understanding and Read More Older Posts Newer Posts Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/author/walkerh1986/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News digest – bowel cancer news, HPV and cervical cancer, diesel fumes and dental hygiene - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog News digest bowel cancer news HPV and cervical cancer diesel fumes and dental hygiene News digest bowel cancer news HPV and cervical cancer diesel fumes and dental hygiene Category Science blog June 16 2012 Kat Arney It s time for a roundup of the week s top cancer news There s a crop of stories about bowel cancer in the news this week a couple of which have come from the National Cancer Intelligence Network NCIN conference which took place on Thursday and Friday New data confirm that bowel screening is effective at detecting the disease at an earlier stage when treatment is more likely to be successful However concerning statistics show that the poorest bowel cancer patients are more likely to die within a month of surgery a finding that needs addressing urgently Away from the world of stats two important papers in the journal Nature reveal why some bowel cancers become resistant to treatment And our researchers in Leeds published results from a small clinical trial testing an exciting new approach for treating bowel cancer a tweaked version of a harmless cold virus Read more in our press release and on the NHS Choices blog HPV and cervical cancer Based on genetic signatures US researchers have found that only certain types of cells in a woman s cervix may be susceptible to HPV infection the prime cause of cervical cancer In this article in the Guardian campaigners argue that HPV vaccination should be extended to gay men as the virus also causes anal and penile cancers Looking outside our own borders this feature highlights the need for HPV vaccination and cervical screening in countries such as Kenya where cervical cancer kills thousands of women every year Also in the news this week Our researchers at the University of Sussex have solved a 30 year old genetic puzzle unravelling the three dimensional structure of the enzyme PARP Many researchers around the world are investigating drugs that block PARP known as PARP inhibitors and some are currently being tested in clinical trials Understanding more about the exact size and shape of the enzyme will help researchers develop the next generation of PARP inhibitors The International Association for Research on Cancer IARC part of the World Health Organisation classified diesel fumes as a Group 1 carcinogen Our bloggers discussed what this actually means with a little expert help from Professor David Philips and some bananas The NHS Choices blog also covered the issue in depth pointing out that sunlight and Chinese salted fish are also Group 1 carcinogens NICE has said no to new melanoma drug vemurafenib Zelboraf on grounds of cost The drug targets a faulty version of the protein BRAF discovered by our scientists Our Chief Clinician Professor Peter Johnson described the decision as frustrating saying We want to see Roche offer a price that the NHS can afford There was some good news from

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/06/16/news-digest-bowel-cancer-news-hpv-and-cervical-cancer-diesel-fumes-and-dental-hygiene/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ovarian cancer treatment – a bright future - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    disease if it came back But the improvement s also linked to the introduction of specialised gynaecological surgeons who regularly operate on diseases like ovarian cancer and who tend to have a better success rate than general surgeons As well as these improvements in treatment there s also the possibility that at least some of the change is due to improvements in the way the disease is classified In particular it s possible that better surgeons have collected better quality staging data and ovarian cancers that might have been mistakenly classified as early are now properly classified as later stage disease Not one disease but many Whatever the reasons for the changes there s still a lot to learn about the disease For instance it s now becoming apparent that what we call ovarian cancer is in fact at least three distinct and very different diseases The main type is known as high grade serous ovarian cancer and this makes up the majority of cases Evidence is now emerging that these cancers may not even start in the ovaries but instead originate in the cells that make up the fallopian tubes It now seems that these cancers are driven by a very distinct set of defective genes including in about a quarter of cases a pair of genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2 which are infamous for their role in inherited breast cancers Two other types of ovarian cancer endometrioid and clear cell account for about two out of every 10 cancers and are less strongly linked to mutations in BRCA genes The remainder of cases are made up of a fourth form called mucinous cancer and others that are impossible to classify Breakthrough treatments on the horizon As regular readers of this blog will know new types of cancer drug collectively called PARP inhibitors are generating a lot of excitement in the research community PARP inhibitors have been carefully designed to treat cancers driven by faulty BRCA genes and Cancer Research UK scientists have been instrumental in their development Most of the trials carried out so far have looked at whether PARP inhibitors can treat women with breast cancer caused by inherited BRCA gene faults who make up about five per cent of breast cancer cases Finding that faulty BRCA 1 and 2 genes are common in serous ovarian cancer is exciting and means that that these drugs may ultimately be useful for women with this form of the disease According to Cancer Research UK s ovarian cancer expert Dr James Brenton one intriguing possibility is that these women could first be given a platinum drug for a short period and then longer term PARP inhibitor treatment to mop up any remaining cancer cells As PARP inhibitors can be taken as tablets rather than intravenously this would be especially convenient as an outpatient treatment This is a strategy that a team of researchers led by Professor Jonathan Lederman at UCL has been testing in a clinical trial Results are

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2011/03/14/ovarian-cancer-treatment-a-bright-future/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Shape-shifting molecular cousins are the key to DNA repair - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    we were embarking on was a real challenge something that had foxed the entire field for decades We took a leap of faith and turned to C elegans because we thought it might offer some simplicity Our previous work with worms has established in detail how certain DNA repair proteins function so we came to it with an open mind But we had no guarantees It was a tough job and Martin ended up spending the first three of the four years of his PhD trying to come up with ways of purifying two of C elegans own RAD51 paralog proteins called RFS 1 and RIP 1 It was arduous work proteins generally need to be kept cool as they re purified to prevent them disintegrating As a result he had to spend hours in the cold room at 4⁰ C and even ended up staying overnight at the institute when things got really busy Eventually he made a breakthrough The trick was to genetically modify the yeast to start producing both proteins at the same time After a lot of tweaking and testing Martin was able to grow around a hundred litres of soupy broth packed with yeast cells all churning out the worm proteins Now the real experiments could start Putting together the puzzle Painstaking research over many years has shown that RAD51 coats the single stranded stretches of DNA before they get patched up This creates a sturdy stick like filament that helps to protect the vulnerable strands from any further accidental damage and helps them to pair up with the matching DNA template But there s a problem this RAD51 coated filament is stiff and inflexible not the best shape for wriggling through the DNA inside the cell s nucleus in search of its pair And as Simon and Martin have now discovered it s here that RAD51 s paralog cousins step in The first clue came when Martin mixed DNA and RAD51 filaments together with the paralog proteins purified from C elegans He noticed that they seemed to change the filaments physical properties suggesting that the paralogs were having some kind of effect on their shape or structure Other experiments suggested that the fibres were becoming more loosely packed when the paralogs bound to them To find out exactly what was going on he had to look closer Much closer And to do that he needed some help RAD51 paralog proteins black blob binding to the end of a RAD51 and DNA filament First he worked with Raffaella Carzaniga and Lucy Collinson in our Electron Microscopy Unit in London to see whether the RAD51 paralogs were really making contact with these stiff little filaments Zooming in right down to the level of individual molecules they saw that the RAD51 paralogs the black blob in the image on the right were firmly attached to one end of the stick like RAD51 and DNA fibre To find out more about what was going on they needed yet

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/07/20/shape-shifting-molecular-cousins-are-the-key-to-dna-repair/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •