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  • NCRI Cancer Conference 2009: PARSPORT – fewer side effects from radiotherapy - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    trial called PARSPORT run by The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital Here s a short video about the research The trial was testing a new technique for giving radiotherapy to people with head and neck cancer called intensity modulated radiotherapy or IMRT Since it allows doctors to more accurately target a patient s tumour IMRT helps to avoid damage to the salivary glands a common side effect of radiotherapy to the head which can cause serious problems with speech and eating as well as increasing the chance of mouth ulcers and infections The results of the trial are impressive The researchers found that after 12 months only 39 per cent of the 94 patients who had the new treatment suffered from dry mouth compared to 74 per cent who had the traditional treatment a dramatic improvement in the quality of life for patients compared to those receiving standard radiotherapy Trials of IMRT for treating various other cancers are currently under way including a number funded by Cancer Research UK such as COSTAR The technique is being adopted by an increasing number of radiotherapy centres around the UK as new equipment becomes available so more and more patients should be able to benefit from it Giving radiotherapy a boost Until a few years ago little research was done in radiotherapy since unlike drug trials often bankrolled by pharmaceutical companies there was little financial incentive But alongside technical advances the UK cancer community recognised the importance of researching radiotherapy and the need to do even more As part of our five year strategy we will be putting more research investment into radiotherapy We already fund plenty of research at the Cancer Research UK MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology in Oxford the largest radiotherapy research facility in Europe as well as the work of scientists and doctors across the UK Together they are working to improve the effectiveness and accuracy of the treatment Radiotherapy has already made a big impact on cancer survival in the UK thanks in part to work we re supporting And in the future we hope our investment will lead to more lives saved with fewer side effects You can read more about the trial in our press release Kat Share this article More on this topic Tags Cancer Research UK funded research Head and neck cancers Radiotherapy Research and trials Treatment Comments Click here to cancel reply Kat Arney November 9 2009 Hi Warren We re pleased to hear about the progress your son has made and wish him the best with his recovery Here in the UK plans are being made to provide Proton Beam Therapy In August this year it was announced that England would take steps towards introducing the technique as part of the National Cancer Plan more info here http www timesonline co uk tol life and style health article6799483 ece Proton beam therapy is available at Clatterbridge on the Wirral but this is the only facility

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2009/10/05/parsport-fewer-side-effects-from-radiotherapy/ (2016-02-11)
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  • A year of research – and 13 milestones you helped fund - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    how the trial will work These are just a small selection of the standout research moments from our year in review achievements that have only been made possible via the generous donations from our supporters So we want to take this opportunity to thank each and every one of you for your fantastic support To read more about our recent achievements take a look at our Highlights of 2013 blog post or head over to the annual review page on our website And to stay up to date you can subscribe to this blog either via its RSS feed or by typing your email address into the box in the right hand column Nick Share this article More on this topic Tags Biomarker research Breast cancer Cancer genes Cancer Research UK funded research Cancer spread metastasis Cancers in teens and young adults Children s cancers Clinical trials Immune system Kidney cancer Lung cancer Melanoma Ovarian cancer Prostate cancer Research and trials Skin cancer Treatment Comments Click here to cancel reply Ivan August 25 2014 Its all good but as a researcher that had Hodiaslimphoma stomach cancer that reasearch that is needed are as follow Blood and brain cancer Nicola August 23 2014 First of all thanks for sending me an email It s great you let people know what their money goes towards Although I think there should be more visual aid on the site to explain what the points mean I can t use the links on mobile and not just one video at the very end Other than that it s fab Margaret August 22 2014 Our son would not be here now without the help of Cancer Research UK he had testicular cancer in 1997 which was very advanced and had a very low chance of recovery He was given stem cell treatment which was very new the and it almost killed him but he is now a healthy young man with a wife and thanks to storing sperm is a father We can never thank Cancee Research UK enough and will always continue to fund raise for them as long as we are able Allan Trousdale August 22 2014 Thank you for your continued efforts on behalf of those who suffer from any of the many cancers Your newsmails are very welcome Edna Williams August 22 2014 It is good to know of progress in more detail Are bone marrow cancers eg Waldenstrohm s a separate issue Is there any progress in research in this domain Nick Peel August 21 2014 Thanks everyone for your comments We ve noticed some of you mentioning brain tumours and pancreatic cancer as important areas in need of more research we agree which is why we have made these cancers along with oesophageal cancer and lung cancer a major research priority for us in the future You can read more about how we are tackling these cancers in our blog post about our new strategy And you can read more about our research on brain tumours here and pancreatic cancer here Thank you all once again for your amazing support Nick Cancer Research UK Na amat Little August 21 2014 Thank you for your website and for both the information given about cancer updates and comments from people It is wonderful to know the achievements made so far in combating different kinds of cancer Brilliant news Wonderful information resource Tracy August 21 2014 I am truly grateful to everyone involved in Cancer Research From the women yes every single one of us that get s out and helps raise money for cancer research for the families and friends that help support us during our fund raising and for the doctors and their teams who help to save lives and not forgetting the all important research My mum fought bravely vaginal cancer 8 years ago and touch wood is still clear Cancer made a comeback as a tumour on her head which she bravely dealt with last year and has successfully been removed Although on 3 monthly check for 5 years now we live in hope that this will not return but she will keep fighting as will the family to rid my mum of this awful disease and everyone else that is currently suffering or suffered from this horrific disease We could not do this without everyone s support thank you from the bottom of my heart for keeping my wonderful mum alive Margaret Watford August 21 2014 Amazing work I had radical surgery for uterine cancer a year ago then 3 months later my daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer at 38 weeks pregnant We can t thank everyone enough during our treatment although she has undergone far more than me with a young baby to care for Please keep donations coming in for this good cause I think we will eventually beat this dreadful disease Yvonne Lunn August 20 2014 I lost my wonderful husband in 2012 to oesophageal cancer For six months he suffered so badly Anything Our family can do to help cancer research we will The progress you are making is wonderful Michele freeman August 20 2014 I will do anything I can for us to beat cancer my daughter was 2 1 2 and was diagnosed with retanomblastoma we have been going to Birmingham children s hospital for 2 1 2 yrs for her treatment she had 4 tumors in her left eye which see has no sight in now but managed to keep her eye she also carries the genetic gene she will be monitored for the rest off her life we now go to Manchester children s hospital for regular check ups every 4 months also my mum has had breast cancer the first time was 23 years ago she had radiation for her treatment she was diagnosed with it again 3 months ago in the same breast which she had to have removed 3 wks ago and is doing well she

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/07/25/a-year-of-research-and-13-milestones-you-helped-fund/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Georgia’s story: a parent’s perspective on childhood cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Georgia during treatment On that first day on the ward they redid the x ray and ultrasound They confirmed that the tumour was coming from her kidney and was spreading out into her abdomen pushing all other organs aside The next day she had an MRI scan and biopsies of the tumour Three days later we celebrated her first birthday All of the family flew and drove from afar to celebrate worried that this was the only birthday we would celebrate with her The following day we then returned to the hospital for her biopsy results and received the news that we had dreaded it was cancer and worse it had spread Our lives were turned upside down They told us they were confident it was either neuroblastoma or Wilms Tumour A port a tube to give chemotherapy was inserted and chemotherapy was planned for shortly after that At this stage we didn t have a definitive diagnosis but the tumour was too large not to start treating A second surgical biopsy was also arranged prior to the chemotherapy starting Weeks later we had confirmation that Georgia had a stage 3 Wilms tumour The plan was to give her six weeks of chemotherapy to shrink the tumour before surgery that would remove both tumour and kidney Shortly after diagnosis they decided to introduce a third intensive drug doxorubicin in the hope that Georgia could be treated without radiotherapy which would have such a profound long term effect on her wee body It was a blow we had done our research and it was a drug we wanted to avoid but the tumour reacted dramatically and I swore I could see her stomach shrinking before my eyes at every nappy change Her first dose of doxorubicin was given to her when her white blood count was very low and she became ill with hand foot and mouth disease For any other child this is easy to shake off but not for Georgia who fought against an unrelenting high fever in hospital for ten nights When her health improved chemotherapy recommenced and the day before my husband s birthday in November she had a seven hour operation to remove the tumour and kidney When the doctors met with the surgeons they couldn t believe they had managed to do it through keyhole surgery In two months it had shrunk from the size of a football to that of a satsuma After an amazing recovery from major surgery she was discharged after less than 48 hours The pathology of the tumour was positive and it was agreed that Georgia would be treated with another seven months of chemotherapy We then had to make the decision of whether or not to consent to radiotherapy They were fairly convinced that they had removed the entire tumour in her operation and we trusted their instinct and decided against putting her through radiotherapy During the administering of the chemotherapy drugs Georgia didn t understand what was going on but somehow grasped everything that should happen So if the nurses didn t complete a procedure properly she wouldn t clap as soon as they did she would clap and smile She was clapping people who were in the short term making her sick When she was not sick she was a very bubbly happy child and so very brave She would never cry or whinge I know Ben or I would never have coped half as well I remember on my birthday in December she was sick nine times My husband was upstairs ill in bed and I remember blubbing away forcing myself to eat some tea in my pyjamas as I had no clean clothes left It wasn t one of my finer birthdays Georgia ready for her first day at school Early January Georgia had a peg inserted for feeding and anti sickness drugs This provided a welcome relief for Georgia from all the vomiting though amazingly she never needed it for feeding Shortly after the peg became more trouble than it was worth and became chronically infected In late April the infection became so bad and internal she spent a week pretty much fighting for her life After fighting this off in June 2009 she completed her treatment and in July we were told that she was in remission She has gone from strength to strength ever since People are amazed by Georgia when they hear what she has been through She s a happy healthy cheeky normal child with nothing to show for her ordeal other than a few scars on her tummy We feel so very lucky to have Georgia still with us and certainly could not be prouder parents of a lovely little girl who has achieved so much in 5 short years She s just started school four years to the day after she had her first MRI and biopsy and is loving it Another milestone ticked off Another milestone that we thought we d never quite reach Ruth Hillman Thanks to advances in research Georgia s story of successful treatment for Wilms tumour is the norm not the exception While just 59 per cent of children survived their disease in the early 1970s 95 per cent now survive Cancer Research UK funded scientists and doctors played a key role in a number of clinical trials that have contributed to this improved survival For instance it was Cancer Research UK funded work that led to children like Georgia being given six weeks of chemotherapy to shrink the tumour before surgery reducing the number who need to be treated with radiotherapy And in the last couple of years Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered genes that are involved in the development of Wilms tumour which could lead to new and improved treatments for the disease But there s so much more to do for the 5 per cent who don t yet beat Wilms tumour and for all children who are diagnosed

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/09/28/georgias-story-a-parents-perspective-on-childhood-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Podcast: redefining breast cancer, tiny brain tumours, bowel cancer progress and more - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Biankin See all researchers More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Podcast redefining breast cancer tiny brain tumours bowel cancer progress and more Podcast redefining breast cancer tiny brain tumours bowel cancer progress and more Category Science blog April 30 2012 Kat Arney Click on the logo to download the podcast This month we hear how a landmark study could revolutionise breast cancer treatment and take a look at the growing evidence on aspirin and cancer We also hear how obesity may be driving rises in kidney and womb cancer rates while smoking patterns of the past mean that lung cancer continue to rise in women Plus scientists develop the first snap shot of tiny brain tumours and we talk to Stephanie Moore MBE about how treatment for bowel cancer has changed since her husband footballer Bobby Moore died from the disease Listen now through the player below Audio clip Adobe Flash Player version 9 or above is required to play this audio clip Download the latest version here You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser Or click here to download the podcast as an mp3 Also the podcast is available on iTunes to subscribe and download for free Alternatively go to the podcast page on our website where you can hear the show directly through our own Flash player and explore previous shows in the archive And there s also a full transcript of the podcast available here We hope you enjoy it please do let us know what you think of the podcast in the comments below or email us at podcast cancer org uk Kat Share this article More on this topic Tags Body weight and obesity Bowel cancer Brain tumours Breast cancer Cancer genes Cancer Research UK funded research Kidney cancer Research and trials Womb cancer Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer Processed meat and cancer

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/04/30/podcast-redefining-breast-cancer-tiny-brain-tumours-bowel-cancer-progress-and-more/ (2016-02-11)
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  • News digest – bowel cancer, kidney cancer, booze, boost for drug development, and more - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog News digest bowel cancer kidney cancer booze boost for drug development and more News digest bowel cancer kidney cancer booze boost for drug development and more Category Science blog March 31 2012 Oliver Childs All the news in one place Another week has flown by and yet more interesting cancer research was in the news both from our own scientists and from research groups around the world We ve summarised the big stories of the week below Click on the links for full coverage There were a few big stats stories out this week On Monday new analysis showed that nearly 10 per cent of bowel cancer patients die within a month of diagnosis And of these over half are over 80 years old and six in 10 are diagnosed following an emergency admission to hospital This suggests that the public especially the elderly may not be aware of bowel cancer s warning signs Then yesterday we released new figures showing that the number of kidney cancers diagnosed each year in Great Britain has risen over 9 000 for the first time Experts think that obesity is one of the key factors behind this staggering 135 per cent rise over the past 35 years Macmillan Cancer Support released a report showing that cancer mortality rates among older people are failing to match the improvements seen in younger patients This is worrying and implies that there s ageism at work in the health service Rare side effects of new cancer drugs particularly heart damage are being under reported in medical literature according to academics in the US They ve called for urgent reform and standardisation of the measurements of possible side effects during clinical trials Our scientists have developed a technique that could be used to detect tiny secondary tumours in the brain a process that is currently impossible The next step will be clinical trials of this imaging technique Two new drug sensitivity encyclopaedias released this week could be invaluable research tools to help scientists search for new cancer drugs And on the subject of valuable research tools we were very interested to read about the UK Biobank an enormous online database of medical and lifestyle records from half a million middle aged Britons which was published yesterday This could be a powerful resource to study diseases like cancer Our commercial arm Cancer Research Technology unveiled an innovative 50 million investment fund to bridge the funding gap in the UK between cancer drug discovery and early development As we say on the blog this joint venture with the European Investment Fund should result in drugs getting to cancer patients faster Our scientists at the Paterson Institute for Cancer Research in Manchester discovered a promising new approach to treat a type of myeloid leukaemia with relatively poor survival The work is still only in the lab where the researchers have designed a molecule to block

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/03/31/news-digest-bowel-cancer-brain-tumours-booze-boost-for-drug-development-and-more/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Podcast: cancer genes, kids smoking, shunning sunbeds, and spotting the signs - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    locations By Researcher Professor Duncan Baird Professor Fran Balkwill Professor Andrew Biankin See all researchers More Our research history Our research strategy FUNDING FOR RESEARCHERS Our funding schemes Biomarker Project Awards Career Development Fellowship Grand Challenge award View all schemes and deadlines Applying for funding Start your application online Guide to filling in your application form How to make a successful application Funding committees Manage your research grant Manage your grant online Guide to managing a grant online Notify us of new publications Update your profile How we deliver research Our research strategy Our institutes Our centres Our research partnerships More Drug discovery and development Recently funded awards Researcher case studies ABOUT US What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Podcast cancer genes kids smoking shunning sunbeds and spotting the signs Podcast cancer genes kids smoking shunning sunbeds and spotting the signs Category Science blog March 22 2012 Kat Arney Click on the logo to download the podcast In this month s podcast a landmark cancer study sheds light on tumour genes and experts suggest that more breast cancer patients should have genetic tests New figures reveal worrying numbers of schoolchildren taking up smoking and leading model agencies sign up to a no sunbed policy Meanwhile a new drug combo destroys pancreatic cancer in the lab and our Delay Kills report shows that ignorance and fear are behind thousands of avoidable cancer deaths Listen now through the audio player below Audio clip Adobe Flash Player version 9 or above is required to play this audio clip Download the latest version here You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser Or click here to download the podcast as an mp3 Also the podcast is available on iTunes to subscribe and download for free Alternatively go to the podcast page on our website where you can hear the show directly through our own Flash player and explore previous shows in the archive And there s also a full transcript of the podcast available here We hope you enjoy it please do let us know what you think of the podcast in the comments below or email us at podcast cancer org uk Kat Share this article More on this topic Tags Breast cancer Cancer genes Cancer Research UK funded research Kidney cancer Pancreatic cancer Research and trials Signs and symptoms Popular posts Most read today Most discussed Don t believe the hype 10 persistent cancer myths debunked How does alcohol cause cancer Processed meat and cancer what you need to know How does alcohol cause cancer Headlines

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2012/03/22/podcast-cancer-genes-kids-smoking-shunning-sunbeds-and-spotting-the-signs/ (2016-02-11)
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  • NCRI 2014 conference summary – day 2 - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    recent massive upheaval in NHS services ushered in by the Coalition Government in 2012 There are encouraging signs though The new focus on cancer data audits and intelligence is revealing in detail where to divert scarce resources to make the most impact while a new post mid Staffordshire inspection regime is showing and beginning to fix huge regional variations in care Ultimately says Richards focusing on the basics prevention detection access to treatment quality care should lead to even more improvements in the the future Sequence all the things Professor Mike Stratton director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge was next to offer a wide ranging overview of cancer genomics a really exciting area that s been growing quickly over the past few years Stratton explained that researchers have now mapped the entire genetic landscape of more than 10 000 individual cancers across nearly all of the most common forms of the disease as well as many rarer ones Importantly Stratton stressed this type of research will be vital in uncovering new faults in cancer cells that could be targeted with drugs but it s also proving that cancer is a complex enemy But international collaborations like the International Cancer Genome Consortium are helping make sense of the data sharing information gathered from clinical trials and other research to ensure progress is as fast as possible And as Professor Stratton emphasised the cancer genome is finite and we need to exploit that finiteness Developing new drugs Taking what we d heard about the cancer genome and translating this into the world of drug development Dr William Sellers from the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research in the US was up next focussing on the success of some therapies developed based on genetic information He discussed the big challenges that still remain for developing new drugs and how future research must tackle these challenges He highlighted a need to keep plugging away at molecules that have been difficult to target with drugs so far and to also focus on important protective genes known as tumour suppressors that can be faulty and switched off in cancer Sellers finished his talk with a discussion around what to do when tumours become resistant to the treatments we do have something clinicians have to deal with daily The question he posed was whether genetics can predict this happening Focusing on a faulty molecule produced when two genes are fused together known as BCR Abl Sellers showed that mice with a type of leukaemia caused by this fault were cured by combining two drugs that block different parts of the BCR Abl molecule Circulating markers Liquid biopsies monitoring the blood for the presence of cancer are currently a hot topic in the cancer field and it s clear that the chair of the next session Professor Caroline Dive from our Manchester Institute is excited about them Professor Dive began by setting the challenge that within five years blood tests will be used to personalise treatments detect relapses earlier and uncover the mechanisms of drug resistance an exciting proposition that would benefit patients and scientists alike Researchers working in this field are focusing on two main phenomena circulating tumour cells CTCs which break off from a patient s tumour into their bloodstream and circulating free DNA which similarly is released from a growing cancer as its cells die and are replaced In the session we heard from experts in both fields Christophe Klein from Regensberg in Germany showed how measuring the numbers of CTCs might even be better than traditional biopsies as they can reveal mutations not in the original cancer And Dr Alain Thierry showed off new technology to measure circulating DNA that he predicts will be about a year away from prime time Finally Professor Dive told us about her pioneering experiments to understand small cell lung cancer a devastating form of the disease for which treatment and survival rates have remained the same for more than 20 years A key bottleneck for progress has been that tissue samples are hard to come by since most patients have disease too advanced for surgery Dive s got around this by extracting CTCs from patients and using them to create tumours in experimental mice allowing the disease to be studied in unprecedented detail This is now accelerating research into the disease and she hinted at exciting new data in the pipeline Cancer prevention it s important to remember the size of the problem Given rising cancer incidence there was a whole session at today s conference looking at new horizons in cancer prevention We started off with a discussion of the use of drugs to reduce risk so called chemoprevention and the potential of the breast cancer drugs tamoxifen and anastrazole as well as aspirin to cut the number of people developing cancer Then Tim Lobstein Director of Policy at the World Obesity Federation highlighted the huge and important issue to be faced in tackling obesity and unhealthy diets Since the 1970s the average UK citizen has got 9kg heavier something we spend around 215 kcal and 54p a day maintaining which translates into 10 8 billion a year spent across the UK just on staying as overweight as we currently are Far from pointing the finger at the individual no less than the Director General of the WHO last year stated the obesity epidemic is not a failure of individual willpower but a failure of political will This was underlined by the alarming fact that the millions spent by the UK government promoting healthy lifestyles each year would only fund food and drink advertising for a matter of days In tackling this it s crucial not to become part of the problem remembering gains do not lie in further stigmatising people who are obese Rather we must find ways to change the conversation as well as the make up of the average high street Feeling the heat Professor Fran Balkwill led a session exploring the

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/11/04/ncri-conference-summary-day-2/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Stratified medicine and the lung cancer ‘Matrix’ trial – part of a cancer care revolution - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    with the funding technology and expertise in place our unified network is primed to start linking up potential new treatments with lung cancer patients who based on a molecular test may benefit from them So how will it work Taking it to the next level Our focus for SMP2 is the development of an ambitious clinical trial called the National Lung Matrix Trial which is part of the next generation of flexible clinical trials testing multiple drugs in multiple groups of patients It s important to stress that the trial is not yet recruiting patients But once it opens in the summer it will be divided up into multiple arms with each arm being linked to a potential new drug treatment Each treatment has been developed to target precise genetic faults which we ll be testing for using our specialised next generation sequencing system developed specifically for the programme And the libraries of new drugs will initially come courtesy of our partners AstraZeneca and Pfizer Watch an animation of how the trial will work The trial is being led by chief investigator Professor Gary Middleton in conjunction with the Early Drug Development Team at the Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit CRCTU in Birmingham but nationwide participation will be made possible by the ECMC network across the UK The design allows multiple drugs in early stages of development to be tested in a single trial Small groups of 15 20 patients will be placed onto an arm of the trial based on genetic matchmaking between their lung tumour and the targeted treatments They will then receive the genetically matched drug and researchers will monitor their response If a treatment shows promise defined by improvements in survival tumour shrinkage or an alleviation of symptoms then there s the potential for that arm to break off from the main trial and grow into a larger independent trial with more patients who share that genetic profile Expanding these patient groups will depend on the number of people available for larger trials who match that particular profile as well as the stage of development the corresponding drug has reached If the treatment doesn t provide any benefit for that group of patients the arm can be reassessed and removed from trial As arms are lost or grow new arms can be added to test more new drugs as they become available demonstrating the flexibility of this new age of clinical trial design So what s different Scouring genetic letters to find the spelling mistakes that group patients The breadth of genetic faults we ll be testing for combined with the potential number of drugs in the trial make the setup of SMP2 particularly exciting Genetic tests are commonly used to pinpoint the single spelling mistakes known as point mutations present in a cancer cell s genetic code that produce faulty proteins and drive uncontrolled cell growth But there are also situations where excessive cell growth is caused by genetic errors that produce key growth

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/04/17/stratified-medicine-and-the-lung-cancer-matrix-trial-part-of-a-cancer-care-revolution/ (2016-02-11)
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