archive-org.com » ORG » C » CANCERRESEARCHUK.ORG

Total: 768

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Dr Julian Huppert MP: “What will it take to make UK science great? Investment, people and collaboration” - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    Previously we ve heard from the Conservatives David Willetts MP and from Labour s Liam Byrne MP What would a strong science innovation and research environment mean to the man on the street in the UK When I think about the impact innovation research and science can have on people I m reminded of something Dr Benjamin Franklin once said Without continual growth and progress such words as improvement achievement and success have no meaning Although research can seem technical and remote from our everyday lives its end result sets the tone of how we live Building a strong science innovation and research community now means people in future will have a better chance of living healthier longer lives And that s something we can all sign up to How important is government spending on medical and clinical research in particular Government support is crucial for three reasons First the more we invest the more research we can do and the more chance we have of developing treatments that will really make a difference for patients Second there is clear evidence that when government invests in research and development it sets a good example creating the confidence for other investors to put money on the table too And third we now know that investing in research helps the UK economy as a whole with some 40p from every pound spent on cancer related research alone being poured back into the UK pot in each subsequent year Put simply investing now means a brighter future Your vision for science innovation and research what are the top highlights The UK is where penicillin was developed and the structure of DNA discovered I look to a future in which the UK has cemented and strengthened this proud heritage But we ll need to up our game to make this happen Investment mentioned above is crucial for making UK science flourish But it s not enough It s just as important that we make sure we have the right people people with skills passion and talent both home grown and from abroad So we must make sure that those with potential especially people from underrepresented groups like women or students from poorer socioeconomic backgrounds are supported at all levels of the UK education system But we also need to be attracting talented students from other countries to the UK to both study and work By cultivating both these groups we re making sure the research pool of tomorrow is an exciting potential rich goldmine of expertise What role does the UK have to play in fostering an integrated global research hub Research is all about collaboration The UK is already renowned for punching above its weight making up less than one per cent of the global population it accounts for 3 per cent of R D expenditure 4 per cent of researchers 6 per cent of research articles 10 per cent of research article downloads and 16 per cent of the world s most

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/11/11/dr-julian-huppert-mp-what-will-it-take-to-make-uk-science-great-investment-people-and-collaboration/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Two million reasons to beat cancer - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Two million reasons to beat cancer Two million reasons to beat cancer Category Science blog October 7 2014 Catherine Guinard We re running ever harder just to stay still These are the words of our Chief Clinician Professor Peter Johnson on the enormous challenges cancer still poses The fact is in spite of the huge strides we have made today there are two million people living with or affected by cancer in the UK And we think that s far too many That s why every day we try harder to beat cancer sooner Making sure the Government prioritises cancer is a crucial part of our work And with just over six months to go before the next General Election it s time to reaffirm what challenges we face and make sure the next Government is ready to take action from day one We need to make sure the next Government commits to improving things on all fronts research prevention diagnosis and care for people affected by cancer now and in the future Teaming up tackling cancer In September we launched a collaborative initiative with more than 30 other cancer charities Cancer 2 million reasons is a chance for the cancer community to speak with one voiceto drive home the message on cancer as well as marking the countdown to next year s General Election Each month the initiative will publish a new infographic designed to raise awareness among those hoping to form the next administration on the work still to do As our recent report demonstrated diagnosing cancer early can make a big difference not just to patients but to the affordability of care So we kicked off the initiative with an infographic explaining the importance of diagnosing cancer early This month we ll be focusing on the value of research in beating cancer In fact just last week fresh figures revealed that only three out of 10 patients have had the opportunity to discuss research While over 50 per cent of those not asked would have liked to discuss it Get involved To spread the word we ll need your help Look out for the infographics as they are published on the 7 th of each month and help us create a buzz by sharing them on social media For example you could Retweet cancerreasons using thehashtag cancerreasons to add your voice and share your reasons for supporting the initiative Tweet to your MP to let him her know ten things he or she should do to help beat cancer The next Government has two million reasons to fight back against cancer let s make sure it is ready for the job

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/10/07/two-million-reasons-to-beat-cancer/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Liam Byrne MP: Investment in science is an investment in patients - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    What we do We beat cancer We fundraise We develop policy Our organisation Our strategy Our Trustees CEO and Executive Board Annual report and accounts Annual review Current jobs Graduates and interns Your development Benefits Cancer news Science blog Latest press releases Latest news reports Search all news More Contact Us Press office Publications HOME ABOUT CANCER SUPPORT US NEWS RESOURCES FUNDING RESEARCH ABOUT US You are here Home border 0 Support us Home About us Cancer news Science blog Liam Byrne MP Investment in science is an investment in patients Liam Byrne MP Investment in science is an investment in patients Category Science blog June 13 2014 Catherine Guinard Liam Byrne MP is Shadow Minister for Universities Science and Skills as well as Labour MP for Birmingham and Hodge Hill Below he shares his vision for science and research in the UK This post forms part of a series highlighting the main political parties perspectives on science and research Previously we ve heard from David Willetts Minister for Universities and Science and Conservative MP for Havant Scientific research is a public good The more we know about science the more we can help patients Advances in scientific research particularly in the fields of medicine and pharmaceuticals have already transformed our quality of life and addressed some of the health challenges we face such as cancer But we need to do more That s why a long term public and privately funded research and development R D strategy is vital Scientific investment is a long game Areas of research that address major social challenges such as public health and medicine do not enjoy immediate payback but the long term rewards have great social benefit Investing in science and innovation also means a stronger and fairer economic future To make this a reality the next government must have a long term vision for science and a robust plan to grow British talent in science skills Focus on funding Many of the world s largest economies are increasing their investments in science whilst the opposite is happening here Compared to thirty years ago the UK has cut spending on higher education and research whilst other countries like France and Germany are increasing theirs Our international competitors are leading the way with targeted research that brings together public and private support for long term social challenges without picking winners or compromising research independence For example the European Commission s long term research programme Horizon 2020 places its three pillars industrial leadership societal challenges and excellent science on an equal footing Prioritising education When it comes to science skills we are currently not doing enough as a country to invest in the next generation of scientist and researchers who will deliver the health gains we need For example the way in which science is taught has a major influence on the number of young people who persevere with science and technology subjects It is also vital that science has a prominent role in the

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/06/13/liam-byrne-mp-investment-in-science-is-an-investment-in-patients/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hitting the self-destruct switch – standing up to womb cancer with PARP inhibitors - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    drugs known as PARP inhibitors Beyond repair DNA is the instruction manual inside each of our cells encoded in the form of genes They tell our cells when to grow when to die and what to do But these precious instructions are vulnerable to damage Our genetic code contains around three billion letters that s more than 800 times as many as the complete works of Shakespeare Most mistakes in this code don t cause significant problems they re the equivalent of missing a full stop or space but some errors can completely change the meaning of the instructions or destroy them altogether If too many mistakes build up in the DNA of one cell some of the instructions eventually become illegible and this can lead to cancer Protein structure of PARP 1 Fortunately our cells are equipped with plenty of molecular toolkits that find and repair damaged DNA This helps to prevent errors accumulating to dangerous levels and protects us from cancer What s more if the mistakes in the genetic code cannot be fixed the cell is programmed to self destruct shutting down safely before any more damage can be done However cancer cells manage to escape this failsafe Instead of shutting down when the damage to their DNA becomes too great they continue to grow and divide using a faulty set of instructions Researchers think that this is partly because they are still trying unsuccessfully to make repairs even as they grow and divide out of control Not only does this mean that the cancer cells don t die but they re also able to patch up some of the damage done by chemotherapy and radiotherapy posing a real problem for doctors and patients This cell will self destruct in five four three two One clever way to kill cancer cells is to stop these running repairs leaving the cells so damaged that they have no option but to die In the 1990s Cancer Research UK funded scientist Professor Steve Jackson began investigating how to do just that He wanted to know what would happen if some of the molecules responsible for patching up DNA were switched off He and his team targeted cancers that already had problems with repairing mistakes in their DNA due to faults in genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2 which Cancer Research UK scientists helped to discover Perhaps best known for their connection with actress Angelina Jolie these genes carry the instructions for two parts of an important DNA repair kit Without these repair molecules the cancer cells survive by relying on a backup molecule known as PARP Poly ADP Ribose Phosphorylase to patch up breaks in their DNA So Professor Jackson and his team developed molecules to block the activity of this error fixing lifeline The results were impressive Without either PARP or BRCA based repair the genetic mistakes in cancer cells built up to critical levels finally tipping them over the edge triggering self destruction From the lab to the clinic

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/07/23/hitting-the-self-destruct-switch-standing-up-to-womb-cancer-with-parp-inhibitors/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Our new Pioneer Awards funding scheme – high-risk, high-reward, high-impact - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    we published our latest Research Strategy setting out how we intend to continue and capitalise on our rapidly exploding understanding of cancer The Strategy aimed to address a key question how can we convert this accelerating scientific progress into improvements that make a real difference for people affected by the disease A key realisation we had was that more of the same wasn t good enough we had to look at how to fund completely new areas of science while making sure that the conventional high quality laboratory and clinical cancer research we ve always supported can have even wider impact A year on we can look back proudly on the successful launch of six new funding schemes covering a range of different areas mid career help for up and coming scientists funding to discover new biological therapies and understand the immune system a focus on multidisciplinary research involving engineers and physicists and on preventing cancer and funding aimed at improving collaboration between our existing Centres We also launched an ambitious new Grand Challenge which next year will hand 20million to an international consortium of scientists to solve a key question in cancer research And today we ve announced another new funding scheme to the UK research community the Pioneer Award A Dragons Den approach When we spoke to the research community about how we could best help them make faster progress two things cropped up again and again many didn t think we took enough risks in what we funded And others said it could sometimes take too long to apply for funding especially for smaller more innovative projects The Pioneer Awards launched this week at our biennial researchers get together by our chief scientist Professor Nic Jones aims to address these concerns As of today any researchers no matter what their background or track record will be able to pitch their ideas to our cross disciplinary Pioneers Committee We re particularly keen to hear from people outside of biological and clinical science for example technology experts software developers or behavioural scientists We won t require extensive lengthy documentation up front just a two side outline of the idea submitted anonymously and why it will make a real difference in cancer The Committee will short list the ideas they receive on a regular basis and successful applicants will then be invited to pitch their idea in person to the panel It s almost like a Dragon s Den approach Professor Jones told the audience If their idea is deemed scientifically credible they ll receive grants of up to 200 000 to cover two year long research projects This isn t to replace any of our other funding schemes It s to fund high risk high reward projects that wouldn t be able to happen otherwise We don t know what we re going to get Professor Jones remarked at the launch That s the whole point of it Not all of it will work this is high risk stuff

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/07/02/our-new-pioneer-awards-funding-scheme-high-risk-high-reward-high-impact/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New ovarian cancer blood test is promising – but screening still a way off - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    CA125 and ultrasound But there s an important difference in the US women were flagged as being likely to have ovarian cancer if the levels of CA125 in their blood were above a certain specified level The UK trial on the other hand did something more sophisticated Realising that no two women are the same and so might have different background CA125 levels the team looked at how CA125 levels changed over time They could then see if a woman was more likely to have cancer if their CA125 levels changed compared to a previous measurement rather than if they tipped a pre specified cut off This they surmised would account for differences among different women and potentially be far more sensitive Which brings us to today s headlines The research team has published what is effectively a comparison between the cut off method used by the US team and the changes over time method used in the UK trial known technically as the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm or ROCA The cut off method generally identifies four out of 10 women who subsequently turn out to have ovarian cancer According to today s results the ROCA algorithm can identify more than eight out of 10 women a big improvement But today s results say nothing about whether detecting these women s cancers made a difference to whether they survived Nevertheless it suggests that the UKCTOCS trial might show a different balance of benefits and harms to its US counterpart So what happens next We still need to wait for the UKCTOCS final results later this year before we ll know if this method can actually save lives and whether its benefits outweigh the possible harms And even if it does there are still several possible hurdles ahead Firstly will the UK results be strong enough to outweigh the fact that the US trial was negative When researchers tried to look back at whether using the ROCA method on data from the US trial would have made a difference they found it wouldn t have shifted the balance towards a positive trial result Secondly the data will need to be scrutinised by Government bodies like Public Health England s National Screening Committee which will ultimately decide whether women in the UK should be routinely invited for ovarian screening We re expecting them to review all the data on ovarian screening in late 2015 after the UKCTOCS results are in And finally if the Committee does give ovarian screening the green light the appropriate infrastructure will need to be put in place and piloted to reliably run any possible programme And this would all take time And what if UKCTOCS is negative Will that be the end of the road for ovarian screening Maybe not It s likely that researchers will then pore over the data looking at whether any sub groups of women benefitted more than others Does for example their genetic background or family history make a difference Or are there particular benefits for a narrower age range Even if not are there better tests than CA125 or ultrasound Or can other markers of the disease be used to spot it early The fundamental challenge of detecting ovarian cancers earlier is something that we will continue to try to tackle It s a disease that claims more than 4000 women s lives every year we owe it to their families not to give up And we ll be crossing our fingers for the UKCTOCS team as they analyse the data from their trial Watch this space Henry Read more ovarian cancer symptoms Reference Menon U et al 2015 Risk Algorithm Using Serial Biomarker Measurements Doubles the Number of Screen Detected Cancers Compared With a Single Threshold Rule in the United Kingdom Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening Journal of Clinical Oncology 33 18 2062 2071 DOI 10 1200 JCO 2014 59 4945 Images Ultrasound from Wikimedia Commons via CC BY SA 3 0 Blood samples from Flickr via CC NC ND 2 0 Share this article More on this topic Tags Cancer in the news Cancer Research UK funded research Diagnosing cancer Early detection Ovarian cancer Screening Comments Click here to cancel reply zoe derby May 27 2015 Well i think it is very good and the research is great work put in by a number of More women need to read and learn including try to benefit from the research information being conducted The website is easy to use and follow up with outcomes zoe derby May 27 2015 Well i think it is very good and the research is great work put in by a number of professionals More women need to read and learn including try to benefit from the research information being conducted The website is easy to use and follow up with outcomes Nick Peel May 11 2015 Dear Layla Thanks for your comment and we re sorry to hear about your mother If you have questions about your situation you can call one of the Cancer Research UK nurses free on 0808 800 4040 9am 5am Monday to Friday Or you can email them via this online form Best wishes Nick Cancer Research UK Ann Everett May 10 2015 I know I m not referring to ovarian cancer which I know is very hard to detect but what about the admittedly small minority of us with clear cell cancer I had always had smear tests but after very slight post menopausal bleeding a precautionary hysterectomy I was diagnosed with a tumour only seen in 40 people worldwide I feel that there must be a link to ovarian cancer Your comments would be appreciated but to be honest I have had no interest because my tumour is so rare therefore no connection or funding available Your comments would be appreciated Thanks Layla kolb May 9 2015 My concerns are that I m 42 and dealing with my 62 year old mother who was misdiagnosed

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/05/05/new-ovarian-cancer-blood-test-is-promising-but-screening-still-a-way-off/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ASCO 2011 – Jury still out on ovarian cancer screening - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    examination for four years Participants were screened at 10 centres across the United States between November 1993 and July 2001 and were followed for up to 13 years after the screening period was over New results from the PLCO trial were reported at ASCO showing that this method of screening did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care Furthermore false positive results from the two screening methods often led to unnecessary surgeries and some women had serious complications meaning that women who were screened were actually worse off Indeed 15 per cent of women who received a false positive diagnosis and were then followed up were found to have had a major complication such as infection or cardiovascular complications in their subsequent unnecessary treatment These findings are important for informing future efforts to detect the disease early Plus this trial does not rule out the future use of CA 125 and ultrasound if used differently than in PLCO they could still be effective UKCTOCS the UK s ovarian screening study This is why results from the UK ovarian screening trial UKCTOCS are eagerly awaited Funded by Cancer Research UK in collaboration with the Medical Research Council and the National Institute for Health Research UKCTOCS is also looking at the potential of CA 125 combined with ultrasound screening but it is looking at these tests in a different way to the PLCO trial The UKCTOCS researchers are using a calculation called the risk of ovarian cancer algorithm Rather than just looking at the results of a single CA 125 test they look for changes in CA 125 over time to try to predict the woman s risk of having the disease The results from the algorithm are used to determine what should happen next Women at low risk return to the normal study cycle of annual testing women at high risk have further investigations to find out whether they do have ovarian cancer There are other key differences in the trial design as well In the PLCO trial the women who were screened were offered a CA 125 test every year for six years as well as an annual ultrasound exam every year for four years Participants were followed up in 2010 to see whether they developed ovarian cancer or had died from the disease This meant that women who were recruited at the beginning of the trial in 1993 had a longer follow up period than those recruited later on In her discussion about PLCO at ASCO Professor Usha Menon trial coordinator and one of the principal investigators of UKCTOCS said that it was unlikely that screening would have had an impact in the women who were left to be followed up for longer This dilutes the effect of screening across the trial as the last time these women were screened could potentially have been several years ago and cancers may have developed in the intervening period Changing trial design for more accurate results The

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2011/06/30/asco-2011-%E2%80%93-jury-still-out-on-ovarian-cancer-screening/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Making breast screening more accurate - Cancer Research UK - Science blog
    study s strength says Young is its large size and that it was carried out in the wild as US centres switched to DBT and still found a similar size of improvement in cancer detection and recall rates as the few organised screening studies This means we can be pretty confident that these improvements are real and not down to the way the studies were designed Young says The NHS has itself been studying DBT in a long running trial called TOMMY and the NHS Screening programme is reviewing the wider evidence about DBT In particular there are some significant practical issues to be overcome particularly the much longer time required to read DBT images So we re not there yet but Young predicts the advent of routine DBT is not too far off Screening using MRI X rays aren t the only way to detect breast cancers So it looks like tomography will have a place in the screening programmes of the not too distant future and hopefully reduce the number of women being recalled unnecessarily and increase the number of lives saved by screening But x rays aren t the only way to detect breast cancers you can also use a technique called magnetic resonance imaging MRI too This uses intense magnetic fields to wobble the molecules of a dye that s been injected into the area being screened These wobbles can be reconstructed in a computer to form an exquisitely detailed picture MRI can be much more sensitive than mammography and avoids the need to use x ray radiation And it s already used by the NHS to screen women at particularly high risk of breast cancer such as those carrying an inherited gene fault But it has three serious drawbacks that prevent it being used more widely First you need to inject a dye into the person being screened Secondly it takes a lot of time up to 40 minutes for a full MRI study And as a result of the time taken and because the equipment is more sophisticated thirdly it costs a LOT of money far more than conventional x ray screening But the second paper we spotted this week from a research team in Germany and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that at least two of these problems time and money seems to have been addressed The German team has developed a way of using MRI for breast screening that takes about 3 minutes rather than 40 minutes with no apparent loss of accuracy This is potentially a game changer for MRI as a single unit could screen far more women in a given day vastly reducing the cost of the process However says Young there s still one hurdle to be overcome you still need to inject a dye and this can be an uncomfortable experience compared with going for a mammogram although many women say this is no walk in the park either Nevertheless it s a valuable

    Original URL path: http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/06/27/making-breast-screening-more-accurate/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •