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  • Perkins non-regulatory guidance « NASDCTEc Blog
    combined planning options available under WIOA a clearer articulation of two of WIOA s common performance metrics indicators of effectively serving employers along with measurable skills gains and attempts to provide clarity regarding the sharing of infrastructures costs for WIOA s One Stop system of which postsecondary CTE is a required partner Published in the Federal Register on April 16 th the Obama Administration has opened up these NPRMs for public consumption and comment Responses to the department are due no later than June 16 2015 and can be submitted here by following the on screen instructions NASDCTEc and its partners plan to provide formal comments on the issues outlined above in the coming weeks and will continue to monitor and engage with the federal rulemaking process as it continues throughout the rest of this year CTE Legislation Round Up In March Senators Tammy Baldwin D WI and Tim Kaine D VA co chairs of the Senate CTE Caucus introduced the Next Generation High Schools Act NGHS a bill that would create a 300 million competitive high school redesign program to increase the number of students who graduate college and career ready by connecting schools with comprehensive evidence based reform models similar to those found in CTE Specifically the bill would support applied learning instructional approaches and rigorous CTE curriculum to overhaul high schools in an effort to boost graduation rates and increase student achievement NASDCTEc supported the introduction of this bill and has fully endorsed the proposal A press release on the legislation can be found here and more information is located here In a recent op ed article Senator Baldwin reiterated her intent to introduce additional CTE related legislation further on this year Last week Senators Rob Portman R OH and Mark Warner D VA introduced the Go to High School Go to College Act which seeks to increase student access to postsecondary education The bill would incentive early college and dual concurrent enrollment models offered at the high school level by expanding federal Pell Grant program eligibility to qualifying students to pursue these opportunities A companion bill sponsored by Representatives Marcia Fudge D OH and Chris Gibson R NY has also been introduced in the House NASDCTEc has fully supported and endorsed this legislation and applauds these lawmakers commitment to providing a quality postsecondary education to all students More information on the bill can be found here and a press release from Senator Portman s office is located here Updates from the Obama Administration Last week ED s Office of Career Technical and Adult Education OCTAE released a fourth round of non regulatory guidance for issues surrounding the implementation of the Carl D Perkins Act Perkins Common questions regarding the law s implementation and corresponding answers along with the three previous versions of this Q A can be viewed on OCTAE s newly renovated Perkins Collaborative Resource Network OCTAE has also recently released a summary report of the responses ED DOL and HHS received from last year

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=perkins-non-regulatory-guidance (2016-01-08)
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  • Arkansas « NASDCTEc Blog
    of the State addresses In fact by the time 46 governors had declared their legislative priorities for the year CTE had appeared in some capacity in nearly half of these speeches and budgets with some devoting significant time to CTE and workforce development Then it was the lawmakers turn to get down to businesses In some states CTE champions emerged from bipartisan legislative coalitions and business groups to help bolster funding and support Note These are just some of the highlights of state CTE activity so far in 2015 and are by no means all encompassing Colorado s 10 bill Ready to Work package was part of a bipartisan pledge from more than two dozen lawmakers to help those being left behind in the state s fast growing economy connect to training and education that can lead them to better jobs In the end the legislature sent eight bills to Gov John Hickenlooper for signature The bills establish incentives for advanced industry companies to create work based learning opportunities authorize a P TECH school to be created funds mobile learning labs that create training areas on site for colleges and companies and increase the number of career pathways in in demand industries such as construction and health care State funding for K 12 CTE in Montana doubled to 2 million annually thanks to the efforts of a group of legislators and local education leaders The original bill proposed raising state funding to 10 million to make Montana s CTE funding in line with nearby states There were also some major governance changes that would alter the way CTE and workforce development programs are delivered South Dakota lawmakers also passed a bill that would dramatically change the governance of the state s four technical institutes such as the one President Barack Obama visited last week The current governing system described as a turf war has the technical institutes controlled by K 12 districts but funded by the state and competing with the Board of Regents which governs the university system for students and course offerings The new law will allow the institutes to establish their own governing body A separate joint resolution which will require an amendment to the state s constitution and go before the voters in July clarifies the roles of the institutes and the Board of Regents In Arkansas new Gov Asa Hutchinson signed a series of three bills that made sweeping changes to career education and workforce training The bills did the following created the Career Education and Workforce Development Board to establish and administer a comprehensive statewide workforce education program as well as the Office of Skills Development to award 15 million in grants for workforce training programs started a 2 million program to provide workforce training planning grants at community colleges and established the Arkansas Workforce Development Board which will be comprised of industry representatives Despite some notable CTE funding boosts 22 states are reportedly facing budget deficits according to a recent analysis from the

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=arkansas (2016-01-08)
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  • cte funding « NASDCTEc Blog
    often fall under this category Current Pell Grant program eligibility requirements have a minimum seat time of 300 instruction hours over the course of at least 16 weeks This frequently leaves out short term postsecondary CTE programs which are essential to equipping students with the relevant skills needed for the 21st century economy something that NASDCTEc encourages Congress to address during the reauthorization of HEA The JOBS Act seeks to address this issue by reducing those program length requirements by half to at least 150 clock hours over a period of 8 weeks In order to qualify programs must be offered at a postsecondary institution which would include area CTE centers and community colleges lead towards the completion of a recognized postsecondary credential as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and be aligned to area workforce needs NASDCTEc was extremely pleased to support and endorse this legislation upon its introduction and remains hopeful that these ideas make their way into the wider reauthorization of HEA Read more about the bill here Presidential Scholars Program Continues to Take Shape As we shared a few months ago President Obama signed an amendment to Executive Order 11155 a move that expanded the existing Presidential Scholars program to include up to 20 CTE students each year in the program The first year of this expansion will take place in the upcoming 2015 16 school year where the Chief State School Officers will nominate CTE scholars based on five criteria academic rigor technical competency ingenuity creativity and the degree to which the student represents the nation s economic sectors and demographic characteristics Student nominations are due from each Chief State School Officer by October 15 2015 where the next step of the process will require additional application materials from selected students By May 2016 the Commission on Presidential Scholars will announce the list of students to be honored at the White House in June The U S Department of Education s Office of Career Technical and Adult Education OCTAE has encouraged State CTE Directors to engage with their State s chief school officer ahead of the nomination process and to more widely disseminate the announcement More detailed information can be obtained on OCTAE s PCRN website and general information about the expansion can be found here Steve Voytek Government Relations Manager By Steve Voytek in Legislation News Public Policy Tags cte funding HEA Presidential Scholars Study State Strategies for Financing CTE Thursday November 13th 2014 The U S Department of Education has released a new study that explores how states fund their Career Technical Education CTE systems beyond the formulas prescribed in the Carl D Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Perkins The study prepared by the National Center for Innovation in Career and Technical Education focuses primarily on how state funding which is often used to off set the higher cost of technical instruction is distributed to local secondary and postsecondary programs The report used survey data collected by the

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=cte-funding (2016-01-08)
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  • Minnesota « NASDCTEc Blog
    Nebraska has also approved a tuition gap assistance program to help residents enrolled in certain associate degree and certificate programs as well as non credit job driven training programs Recipients can use the funds to cover the costs of tuition direct training fees required books and equipment Work based Learning and Job driven Training Washington Colorado and California all expanded work based learning opportunities in particular apprenticeships In California lawmakers allocated 29 1 million to grow new and existing apprenticeship programs in high growth industries Arkansas and Maine also established new employer driven training programs Andrea Zimmermann State Policy Associate By Andrea Zimmermann in Public Policy Tags California career pathways Colorado Florida job driven training Minnesota Nebraska Oregon Virginia washington WIOA work based learning Study State Strategies for Financing CTE Thursday November 13th 2014 The U S Department of Education has released a new study that explores how states fund their Career Technical Education CTE systems beyond the formulas prescribed in the Carl D Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Perkins The study prepared by the National Center for Innovation in Career and Technical Education focuses primarily on how state funding which is often used to off set the higher cost of technical instruction is distributed to local secondary and postsecondary programs The report used survey data collected by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium NASDCTEc that asked State CTE Directors how categorical funds were distributed during academic year 2011 12 as well as the use and perception of performance based funding for CTE In short the survey found that state approaches to CTE funding varies in emphasis and complexity and no single approach will meet the needs of every state The study also called for more research to better understand what impact if any the each of the state funding approaches has on program and student outcomes Financing Secondary and Postsecondary CTE State financing approaches broke down into three main categories foundational funding only funding for area CTE centers and categorical funding Foundational Funding Only All states distribute basic state aid to finance secondary education programming using a variety of formulas In this approach local administrators decide how to distribute funds across instructional priorities including CTE Nine respondents indicated they rely exclusively on foundational funding At community or technical colleges 30 states reported distributing funds to postsecondary institutions through block grants and not distinguishing funding for CTE Funding for Area CTE Centers Through this method funds are dedicated to support programming at area CTE centers that deliver CTE services to part time students Centralizing CTE programs can be a cost effective strategy Seven states reported having separate state funding for these centers at the secondary level and sometimes use a categorical funding approach to distribute funds Categorical Funding This approach dedicates funding to support career related instructional services and typically targets state funding for the exclusive use of CTE programming In fact 37 states earmarked state funds for secondary CTE using one

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=minnesota (2016-01-08)
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  • Missouri « NASDCTEc Blog
    All states distribute basic state aid to finance secondary education programming using a variety of formulas In this approach local administrators decide how to distribute funds across instructional priorities including CTE Nine respondents indicated they rely exclusively on foundational funding At community or technical colleges 30 states reported distributing funds to postsecondary institutions through block grants and not distinguishing funding for CTE Funding for Area CTE Centers Through this method funds are dedicated to support programming at area CTE centers that deliver CTE services to part time students Centralizing CTE programs can be a cost effective strategy Seven states reported having separate state funding for these centers at the secondary level and sometimes use a categorical funding approach to distribute funds Categorical Funding This approach dedicates funding to support career related instructional services and typically targets state funding for the exclusive use of CTE programming In fact 37 states earmarked state funds for secondary CTE using one of the following formulas student based 21 states cost based 7 states and or unit based 9 states At the postsecondary level seven states indicated providing categorical funding while most opted to allocate funding through basic state aid Performance based Funding Just seven states use performance based formulas to allocate secondary CTE funds by tying funding to performance measures such as placement of CTE students into postsecondary education or employment attainment of industry recognized credentials or CTE completion rates For federal Perkins dollars two states Texas and South Carolina do this for secondary CTE Five states Arizona Florida Kansas Missouri and West Virginia indicated using this formula to allocate state CTE funds on the secondary level At the postsecondary level four states Arkansas Georgia Minnesota and North Dakota reported using this approach with state funding while none reported doing this with Perkins funds For the vast majority of states that do not use performance based funding the most common reason was a lack of understanding from state leaders Almost half of states expressed an interest in adopting this approach to allocate a portion of their Perkins funds however training would be necessary if required by legislation Andrea Zimmermann State Policy Associate By Andrea Zimmermann in Research Tags Arizona Arkansas cte funding Florida Georgia kansas Minnesota Missouri North Dakota performance based funding Perkins South Carolina texas West Virginia State CTE Policy Updates July Edition Part Two Wednesday July 31st 2013 This past month a number of states have adopted or implemented policies related to Career Technical Education CTE Below is a part two of July s state policy updates all of which focus on dual enrollment or postsecondary CTE You can read part one here Educational Collaborative Partnership in Maine Maine passed legislation creating a collaborative board with representatives from secondary and postsecondary CTE to implement a program by 2014 15 that will enable more CTE students to earn college credit through dual enrollment while still enrolled in high school Specifically the state defines dual enrollment career and technical education program as a non duplicative learning pathway that begins in junior year extends over a three year period includes summer career academies and a college freshman seminar experiences meets national concurrent enrollment standards includes college level coursework that supports an associate s degree and concludes at the end of the summer following the student s senior year While the agreements are made between institutions there are opportunities for credits to be accepted across the state Dual Enrollment in Rhode Island Rhode Island passed the Dual Enrollment Equal Opportunity Act this month requiring the State Board of Education to create regulation establishing statewide dual enrollment The regulation must allow students to enroll in courses at postsecondary institutions that satisfy academic credit requirements at both the secondary and postsecondary level it is unclear at this time if CTE courses will fall under this distinction of academic credit The State Board of Education is expected to convene a work group to help establish such a policy including its impact on funding and then school districts including charter school and CTE schools will have to adopt the policy by June 2015 Districts will then be required to report annually on the number of students engaging in dual enrollment and number of postsecondary credits earned The bill is effective immediately Missouri s Innovation Education Campuses Missouri passed SB 381 establishing the Innovation Education Campus Fund supporting partnerships between high schools or K 12 districts public or private four year institutions of high education public two year institutions of higher education and or Missouri based businesses The campuses engaging in such partnerships are eligible to receive funds if they are actively working to lower the cost of degree and shorten the time to earning a degree provide applied and project based learning in consultation with the business and industry partners graduate students with direct access to career opportunities and engage in active partnerships in ongoing program development and outcome reviews Kate Blosveren Associate Executive Director By Kate Blosveren in Public Policy Uncategorized Tags dual enrollment Maine Missouri rhode island state CTE policy update State CTE Policy Updates July Edition Part 1 Tuesday July 30th 2013 This past month a number of states have adopted or implemented policies related to Career Technical Education CTE Below is a part o ne of July s state policy updates focusing on CTE funding reporting and governance Tomorrow part two will be released which will focus on legislation addressing dual enrollment and postsecondary CTE California State Budget Includes CTE Grants In early July after months of deliberation and debate California s budget went into effect with 250 million earmarked for grants to K 12 districts charter schools and community colleges in support of CTE The grants will be dispersed through a competitive process with priority given to programs that secure matching funds from industry partners and that are aligned to high need and high growth industries While the grants may be used for new programs it is expected to support existing programs such as Linked

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=missouri (2016-01-08)
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  • North Dakota « NASDCTEc Blog
    systems beyond the formulas prescribed in the Carl D Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Perkins The study prepared by the National Center for Innovation in Career and Technical Education focuses primarily on how state funding which is often used to off set the higher cost of technical instruction is distributed to local secondary and postsecondary programs The report used survey data collected by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium NASDCTEc that asked State CTE Directors how categorical funds were distributed during academic year 2011 12 as well as the use and perception of performance based funding for CTE In short the survey found that state approaches to CTE funding varies in emphasis and complexity and no single approach will meet the needs of every state The study also called for more research to better understand what impact if any the each of the state funding approaches has on program and student outcomes Financing Secondary and Postsecondary CTE State financing approaches broke down into three main categories foundational funding only funding for area CTE centers and categorical funding Foundational Funding Only All states distribute basic state aid to finance secondary education programming using a variety of formulas In this approach local administrators decide how to distribute funds across instructional priorities including CTE Nine respondents indicated they rely exclusively on foundational funding At community or technical colleges 30 states reported distributing funds to postsecondary institutions through block grants and not distinguishing funding for CTE Funding for Area CTE Centers Through this method funds are dedicated to support programming at area CTE centers that deliver CTE services to part time students Centralizing CTE programs can be a cost effective strategy Seven states reported having separate state funding for these centers at the secondary level and sometimes use a categorical funding approach to distribute funds Categorical Funding This approach dedicates funding to support career related instructional services and typically targets state funding for the exclusive use of CTE programming In fact 37 states earmarked state funds for secondary CTE using one of the following formulas student based 21 states cost based 7 states and or unit based 9 states At the postsecondary level seven states indicated providing categorical funding while most opted to allocate funding through basic state aid Performance based Funding Just seven states use performance based formulas to allocate secondary CTE funds by tying funding to performance measures such as placement of CTE students into postsecondary education or employment attainment of industry recognized credentials or CTE completion rates For federal Perkins dollars two states Texas and South Carolina do this for secondary CTE Five states Arizona Florida Kansas Missouri and West Virginia indicated using this formula to allocate state CTE funds on the secondary level At the postsecondary level four states Arkansas Georgia Minnesota and North Dakota reported using this approach with state funding while none reported doing this with Perkins funds For the vast majority of states that do not use performance based

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=north-dakota (2016-01-08)
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  • performance-based funding « NASDCTEc Blog
    CTE systems beyond the formulas prescribed in the Carl D Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Perkins The study prepared by the National Center for Innovation in Career and Technical Education focuses primarily on how state funding which is often used to off set the higher cost of technical instruction is distributed to local secondary and postsecondary programs The report used survey data collected by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium NASDCTEc that asked State CTE Directors how categorical funds were distributed during academic year 2011 12 as well as the use and perception of performance based funding for CTE In short the survey found that state approaches to CTE funding varies in emphasis and complexity and no single approach will meet the needs of every state The study also called for more research to better understand what impact if any the each of the state funding approaches has on program and student outcomes Financing Secondary and Postsecondary CTE State financing approaches broke down into three main categories foundational funding only funding for area CTE centers and categorical funding Foundational Funding Only All states distribute basic state aid to finance secondary education programming using a variety of formulas In this approach local administrators decide how to distribute funds across instructional priorities including CTE Nine respondents indicated they rely exclusively on foundational funding At community or technical colleges 30 states reported distributing funds to postsecondary institutions through block grants and not distinguishing funding for CTE Funding for Area CTE Centers Through this method funds are dedicated to support programming at area CTE centers that deliver CTE services to part time students Centralizing CTE programs can be a cost effective strategy Seven states reported having separate state funding for these centers at the secondary level and sometimes use a categorical funding approach to distribute funds Categorical Funding This approach dedicates funding to support career related instructional services and typically targets state funding for the exclusive use of CTE programming In fact 37 states earmarked state funds for secondary CTE using one of the following formulas student based 21 states cost based 7 states and or unit based 9 states At the postsecondary level seven states indicated providing categorical funding while most opted to allocate funding through basic state aid Performance based Funding Just seven states use performance based formulas to allocate secondary CTE funds by tying funding to performance measures such as placement of CTE students into postsecondary education or employment attainment of industry recognized credentials or CTE completion rates For federal Perkins dollars two states Texas and South Carolina do this for secondary CTE Five states Arizona Florida Kansas Missouri and West Virginia indicated using this formula to allocate state CTE funds on the secondary level At the postsecondary level four states Arkansas Georgia Minnesota and North Dakota reported using this approach with state funding while none reported doing this with Perkins funds For the vast majority of states that do not use performance

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=performance-based-funding (2016-01-08)
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  • South Carolina « NASDCTEc Blog
    or unit based 9 states At the postsecondary level seven states indicated providing categorical funding while most opted to allocate funding through basic state aid Performance based Funding Just seven states use performance based formulas to allocate secondary CTE funds by tying funding to performance measures such as placement of CTE students into postsecondary education or employment attainment of industry recognized credentials or CTE completion rates For federal Perkins dollars two states Texas and South Carolina do this for secondary CTE Five states Arizona Florida Kansas Missouri and West Virginia indicated using this formula to allocate state CTE funds on the secondary level At the postsecondary level four states Arkansas Georgia Minnesota and North Dakota reported using this approach with state funding while none reported doing this with Perkins funds For the vast majority of states that do not use performance based funding the most common reason was a lack of understanding from state leaders Almost half of states expressed an interest in adopting this approach to allocate a portion of their Perkins funds however training would be necessary if required by legislation Andrea Zimmermann State Policy Associate By Andrea Zimmermann in Research Tags Arizona Arkansas cte funding Florida Georgia kansas Minnesota Missouri North Dakota performance based funding Perkins South Carolina texas West Virginia CTE Research Review Friday September 26th 2014 Spotlighting effective apprenticeships Apprenticeships are increasingly gaining attention from policymakers and employers as an effective tool to fight the skills gap and provide workers with higher wages and employment outcomes Through a recent series of white papers Center for American Progress CAP is adding its voice to those calling for more and better apprenticeships in the United States The DC based think tank recently spotlighted five innovative apprenticeships including programs in Vermont South Carolina Washington and Michigan In Washington apprenticeships have proven to be a smart public investment For every 1 the state invests in apprenticeships taxpayers receive 23 in benefits according to one state study Although there is clearly more than one way to structure a program that engages multiple employers CAP offers a few lessons learned from these five successful examples A strong intermediary is key to a strong apprenticeship program A little public investment goes a long way and Industry recognized credentials add value to apprenticeships in nontraditional occupations NACTE final report released The U S Department of Education has released the long awaited final report of the National Assessment of Career and Technical Education NACTE The report focuses on the new features of the Carl D Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Perkins IV Although the NACTE is charged with evaluating the implementation and outcomes of Perkins IV the actual report stops short of providing insight into the effectiveness of the new law The evaluation period covered only the early years of Perkins IV and as such can only shed light on the new law s early implementation Also much of the outside data used in the report comes from before the new

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=south-carolina (2016-01-08)
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