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  • Friends of CTE Blog: Is there a Skills Gap, and can CTE Fill it? « NASDCTEc Blog
    a new book by University of Pennsylvania economist Peter Capelli which Time Magazine covered in an article entitled The Skills Gap Myth Let s acknowledge up front that this is a worthy debate to have and that there are valid arguments on both sides But if you re running a Career and Technical Education CTE program with a waiting list of students trying to get in and a group of employers at the other end anxious to hire your graduates this debate about a skills gap may seem a bit surreal For you it s not a question of whether recovering industries like manufacturing or healthcare are ready to hire it s a question of whether our CTE programs have enough capacity to meet that demand We know there is a skills gap and we know that CTE programs can help fill it But skeptical journalists including those who care enough to read economists like Capelli have a hard time believing there isn t something else at play when you have millions of people out of work and 3 5 million jobs going unfilled Employers may say they can t find workers with the right skills but that seems to fly in the face of the immutable powers of the market where labor supply and demand automatically match up once there s been a necessary adjustment in price i e wages to attract more candidates If employers want welders pay enough and they will come Of course this assumes there are qualified welders or CNC machinists or nurses or ACE certified auto mechanics or rad techs sitting on the sidelines of the labor market fully credentialed but not working because they re waiting for a better offer The fact you would be hard pressed to find an unemployed welder isn t acknowledged by these models employers are snatching them up as quickly as they can find them Nor do they acknowledge that there are many unemployed workers who would be happy to command a welder s starting wage but that there aren t enough funded CTE program slots out there to train all of them Capelli would add that in addition to being stingy employers are being overly selective During my recent appearance on a radio show the host claimed employers aren t satisfied unless applicants have the whole package the job market equivalent of baseball s five tool player literacy and numeracy technical competencies communications skills the ability to work in teams prior experience in the field Employers are no doubt being more cautious in their hiring right now for a variety of reasons some better than others But it s hard to ignore that some industries have changed substantially over the past decade requiring candidates with broader skills than may have been expected for the same position 10 years ago So is this an argument against further investments in workforce skills Instead shouldn t we be thinking about expanding opportunities for people to enroll in the kind of

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=6614 (2016-01-08)
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  • Andy Van Kleunen « NASDCTEc Blog
    Technology Engineering Mathematics Transportation Distribution Logistics Green Sustainability Skills Statements Green Sustainability Module Career Clusters Resources Clusters User Agreement Credentials Student Interest Survey Career Cluster Logos Crosswalks Programs of Study Career Readiness Partner Council Common Core State Standards Product Store Career Clusters Products CTE Products Ordering Information and FAQ CTE in Your State Compare States Policy Legislation Perkins Act Elementary Secondary Education Act Workforce Investment Act Sequestration Congressional Contacts The Strategy CTE Learning that Works for America Campaign Resources Expert Testimonials Friends of CTE User Guides Logos Fact Sheets Presentation Resources Print Materials Campaign Videos Campaign Strategies Apply the Brand The Brand Promise Engage Key Audiences Promote the Message Plan for the Future Campaign Branding Best Practices Replace an Existing Brand Branding Your CTE Resources Communicating through Traditional Media Outlets Conference Materials Engaging Policymakers Engaging Educators Branding Websites Co Branding Campaign User Agreement Relevant Resources Issue Briefs Papers Jobs and the Economy College and Career Readiness Effective Models On Demand Webinars CTE Videos Research from the Field News Events Newsroom Press Releases NASDCTEc Meetings 2014 Spring Meeting 2014 Fall Meeting Archived NASDCTEc Meetings Achieving Excellence in CTE Career Cluster Institute Archived Career Cluster Institutes Webinars Archived Webinars Newsletters Members Membership

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?attachment_id=6619 (2016-01-08)
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  • NSC logo « NASDCTEc Blog
    Corrections Security Manufacturing Marketing Science Technology Engineering Mathematics Transportation Distribution Logistics Green Sustainability Skills Statements Green Sustainability Module Career Clusters Resources Clusters User Agreement Credentials Student Interest Survey Career Cluster Logos Crosswalks Programs of Study Career Readiness Partner Council Common Core State Standards Product Store Career Clusters Products CTE Products Ordering Information and FAQ CTE in Your State Compare States Policy Legislation Perkins Act Elementary Secondary Education Act Workforce Investment Act Sequestration Congressional Contacts The Strategy CTE Learning that Works for America Campaign Resources Expert Testimonials Friends of CTE User Guides Logos Fact Sheets Presentation Resources Print Materials Campaign Videos Campaign Strategies Apply the Brand The Brand Promise Engage Key Audiences Promote the Message Plan for the Future Campaign Branding Best Practices Replace an Existing Brand Branding Your CTE Resources Communicating through Traditional Media Outlets Conference Materials Engaging Policymakers Engaging Educators Branding Websites Co Branding Campaign User Agreement Relevant Resources Issue Briefs Papers Jobs and the Economy College and Career Readiness Effective Models On Demand Webinars CTE Videos Research from the Field News Events Newsroom Press Releases NASDCTEc Meetings 2014 Spring Meeting 2014 Fall Meeting Archived NASDCTEc Meetings Achieving Excellence in CTE Career Cluster Institute Archived Career Cluster Institutes Webinars

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?attachment_id=6620 (2016-01-08)
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  • Andy Van Kleunen « NASDCTEc Blog
    bump comes courtesy of disappointing May and June job numbers and the coincident release of a new book by University of Pennsylvania economist Peter Capelli which Time Magazine covered in an article entitled The Skills Gap Myth Let s acknowledge up front that this is a worthy debate to have and that there are valid arguments on both sides But if you re running a Career and Technical Education CTE program with a waiting list of students trying to get in and a group of employers at the other end anxious to hire your graduates this debate about a skills gap may seem a bit surreal For you it s not a question of whether recovering industries like manufacturing or healthcare are ready to hire it s a question of whether our CTE programs have enough capacity to meet that demand We know there is a skills gap and we know that CTE programs can help fill it But skeptical journalists including those who care enough to read economists like Capelli have a hard time believing there isn t something else at play when you have millions of people out of work and 3 5 million jobs going unfilled Employers may say they can t find workers with the right skills but that seems to fly in the face of the immutable powers of the market where labor supply and demand automatically match up once there s been a necessary adjustment in price i e wages to attract more candidates If employers want welders pay enough and they will come Of course this assumes there are qualified welders or CNC machinists or nurses or ACE certified auto mechanics or rad techs sitting on the sidelines of the labor market fully credentialed but not working because they re waiting for a better offer The fact you would be hard pressed to find an unemployed welder isn t acknowledged by these models employers are snatching them up as quickly as they can find them Nor do they acknowledge that there are many unemployed workers who would be happy to command a welder s starting wage but that there aren t enough funded CTE program slots out there to train all of them Capelli would add that in addition to being stingy employers are being overly selective During my recent appearance on a radio show the host claimed employers aren t satisfied unless applicants have the whole package the job market equivalent of baseball s five tool player literacy and numeracy technical competencies communications skills the ability to work in teams prior experience in the field Employers are no doubt being more cautious in their hiring right now for a variety of reasons some better than others But it s hard to ignore that some industries have changed substantially over the past decade requiring candidates with broader skills than may have been expected for the same position 10 years ago So is this an argument against further investments in workforce skills Instead shouldn

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=andy-van-kleunen (2016-01-08)
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  • National Skills Coalition « NASDCTEc Blog
    data to inform policy track progress and measure success Build industry and education partnerships and Modify the use of resources and incentives to support attainment of the integrated vision Andrea Zimmermann State Policy Associate By Andrea Zimmermann in Public Policy Research Tags middle skill jobs National Governors Association National Skills Coalition Friends of CTE Blog Is there a Skills Gap and can CTE Fill it Thursday July 19th 2012 Andy Van Kleunen Executive Director of the National Skills Coalition Andy Van Kleunen is Executive Director of the National Skills Coalition which he founded in 1998 as The Workforce Alliance in collaboration with leaders from the workforce development and philanthropic communities Van Kleunen has led the NSC to become a nationally recognized voice on behalf of a diverse array of stakeholders building upon his experience as a community organizer a policy analyst and a practitioner advocate with roots in the workforce field He oversees all aspects of the NSC s efforts including building alliances with new partners as well as advising state and federal policy initiatives There has been another surge in press about whether a skills gap really exists in today s lagging economy This most recent bump comes courtesy of disappointing May and June job numbers and the coincident release of a new book by University of Pennsylvania economist Peter Capelli which Time Magazine covered in an article entitled The Skills Gap Myth Let s acknowledge up front that this is a worthy debate to have and that there are valid arguments on both sides But if you re running a Career and Technical Education CTE program with a waiting list of students trying to get in and a group of employers at the other end anxious to hire your graduates this debate about a skills gap may seem a bit surreal For you it s not a question of whether recovering industries like manufacturing or healthcare are ready to hire it s a question of whether our CTE programs have enough capacity to meet that demand We know there is a skills gap and we know that CTE programs can help fill it But skeptical journalists including those who care enough to read economists like Capelli have a hard time believing there isn t something else at play when you have millions of people out of work and 3 5 million jobs going unfilled Employers may say they can t find workers with the right skills but that seems to fly in the face of the immutable powers of the market where labor supply and demand automatically match up once there s been a necessary adjustment in price i e wages to attract more candidates If employers want welders pay enough and they will come Of course this assumes there are qualified welders or CNC machinists or nurses or ACE certified auto mechanics or rad techs sitting on the sidelines of the labor market fully credentialed but not working because they re waiting for a better offer The

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=national-skills-coalition (2016-01-08)
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  • skills gap « NASDCTEc Blog
    operate in a variety of ways from shared time centers offering primarily technical training to full time centers that provide students with both academic instruction and technical training but all provide opportunities for students to receive relevant rigorous CTE And at a time when employers say that they are unable to find workers who have the right skills to fill job vacancies area CTE centers provide a crucial link between the knowledge and skills that students learn and those demanded by local businesses Join us for a webinar that features state and local leaders who will discuss area CTE centers in their states and how they are making connections to the needs of business and industry and their communities The webinar will be held TODAY Thursday April 25th at 3 00 pm ET Register here Speakers include Steve Gratz Ph D Director Office of Career Technical Education Ohio Department of Education Harold Niehaus Director of Instructional Development Miami Valley Career Technology Center Clayton OH Paula Bowles Chief Communications and Marketing Officer Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education Bill Kramer Communications and Marketing Coordinator Canadian Valley Technology Center El Reno OK Kara Herbertson Research and Policy Manager By Kara in NASDCTEc Announcements Webinars Tags business and industry skills gap Spring Meeting Recap What is Career Readiness Friday April 19th 2013 Earlier this week the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium NASDCTEc held its annual Spring Meeting where the notion of career readiness was front and center One session squarely focused on the work of the Career Readiness Partnership Council CRPC in convening a broad group of partners to develop a common definition of Career Readiness which can be found at www careerreadynow org and potential next steps for the partnership and the definition itself The urgency behind the CRPC and the development of a common understanding of what career readiness was driven by a number of factors and Patrick Ainsworth who coordinated much of the work of the CRPC pointed out a few the ongoing development of the Common Core Technical Core the widespread adoption of the college and career ready Common Core State Standards which cover only the academic foundation of career readiness and the lack of understanding of what career readiness means and looks like across the nation The CRPC therefore aimed to create a north star for each of the participating organizations around career readiness to help guide and drive policy and practice The other two panelists representing partnership organizations each discussed what compelled them to join the CRPC and what the definition will mean for them moving ahead Martin Simon of the National Governors Association described how governors are concerned not only about the skills gap but also the coordination gap between educators and workforce investment boards He discussed the need for a more comprehensive system to better link education training and workforce needs that will build career pathways not just training for jobs About half of all governors discussed career pathways or Career and Technical Education CTE in their 2013 state of the state addresses demonstrating they not only care about these issues but consider them to be priorities Andrew Moore from the National League of Cities described the unique role mayors can play in connecting and convening the education and business communities Mayors are deeply concerned about the skills gap and the extremely high unemployment rates among teenagers After the panelists remarks the participants were asked how they might use the career readiness definition moving forward Some responses included Identify ways to apply the definition to key audiences included but not limited to policymakers business and industry high school educators higher education parents students and community based organizations and service providers Formalize the definition and identify how it can be embedded in state policy Engage governors to embrace the definition as a framework for coordinating CTE workforce development and economic development initiatives Embed the definition in Carl D Perkins Career and Technical Education Act reauthorization Provide the definition as a model for districts to use in whole or as a starting point when developing their own definitions of career readiness Kate Blosveren Associate Executive Director By Kate Blosveren in NASDCTEc Spring Meeting Public Policy Uncategorized Tags college and career readiness skills gap Key Stakeholders Convene to Discuss Career Pathways at Pathways to Prosperity Event Friday March 22nd 2013 This week more than 400 educators researchers business leaders economists and civic stakeholders convened at Harvard University to consider the possibility of expanding career pathways in school systems across the country The catalyst for the conference was the February 2011 report from the Harvard Graduate School of Education HGSE titled Pathways to Prosperity Meeting the Challenge of Preparing Young Americans for the 21st Century Many attendees made the case that the United States can no longer ignore the huge mismatch that exists between the skills students learn in school and the needs of the modern workforce Several speakers noted that the college for all movement has led to widespread dropouts within high school and postsecondary education college graduates lacking the skills required by employers and a lack of workers with the high tech skills essential to the economic development of the United States Instead evidence was presented that career pathways prepare all students to be career and college ready and can lead students to higher levels of success as adults Relevant career pathways open up options for students that the traditional high school and college systems cannot or have not provided in the past Ronald Ferguson and William Symonds of the HGSE Pathways to Prosperity Project challenged each person in attendance to submit the steps that they or their organizations will take to advance the Pathways to Prosperity concept During the conference attendees shared their strategies commitments and experiences for expanding the Multiple Pathways approach Some see the need to prepare career ready students as an economic issue some see it as an issue of equity or social justice and others view

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=skills-gap (2016-01-08)
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  • skills traiining « NASDCTEc Blog
    bump comes courtesy of disappointing May and June job numbers and the coincident release of a new book by University of Pennsylvania economist Peter Capelli which Time Magazine covered in an article entitled The Skills Gap Myth Let s acknowledge up front that this is a worthy debate to have and that there are valid arguments on both sides But if you re running a Career and Technical Education CTE program with a waiting list of students trying to get in and a group of employers at the other end anxious to hire your graduates this debate about a skills gap may seem a bit surreal For you it s not a question of whether recovering industries like manufacturing or healthcare are ready to hire it s a question of whether our CTE programs have enough capacity to meet that demand We know there is a skills gap and we know that CTE programs can help fill it But skeptical journalists including those who care enough to read economists like Capelli have a hard time believing there isn t something else at play when you have millions of people out of work and 3 5 million jobs going unfilled Employers may say they can t find workers with the right skills but that seems to fly in the face of the immutable powers of the market where labor supply and demand automatically match up once there s been a necessary adjustment in price i e wages to attract more candidates If employers want welders pay enough and they will come Of course this assumes there are qualified welders or CNC machinists or nurses or ACE certified auto mechanics or rad techs sitting on the sidelines of the labor market fully credentialed but not working because they re waiting for a better offer The fact you would be hard pressed to find an unemployed welder isn t acknowledged by these models employers are snatching them up as quickly as they can find them Nor do they acknowledge that there are many unemployed workers who would be happy to command a welder s starting wage but that there aren t enough funded CTE program slots out there to train all of them Capelli would add that in addition to being stingy employers are being overly selective During my recent appearance on a radio show the host claimed employers aren t satisfied unless applicants have the whole package the job market equivalent of baseball s five tool player literacy and numeracy technical competencies communications skills the ability to work in teams prior experience in the field Employers are no doubt being more cautious in their hiring right now for a variety of reasons some better than others But it s hard to ignore that some industries have changed substantially over the past decade requiring candidates with broader skills than may have been expected for the same position 10 years ago So is this an argument against further investments in workforce skills Instead shouldn

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=skills-traiining (2016-01-08)
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  • Friends of CTE Blog Series: Competitive Advantage Comes from CTE « NASDCTEc Blog
    and the Executive Committee of the Council on Competitiveness Growing up in Bethlehem Pennsylvania I spent a good amount of my formative high school years at my local Career Technical Education CTE then called vocational education school Now as president and CEO of a global company I can testify first hand to how CTE can help equip students with the skills and knowledge to succeed in their careers Moreover CTE has since evolved proving to be as dynamic and innovative as the economy for which it is preparing students In fact I believe that CTE can be a source of competitive advantage for the United States by rebuilding a skilled workforce better trained than ever to compete in the global marketplace Demand and supply gap We know that more scientists and engineers are needed to support the United States economy but a broader look must be given to the overall demand for skilled workers Skilled technical positions will represent the largest number of total openings in the United State s in the next five years Almost 10 million new skilled workers will be needed by 2020 according to the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics Air Products employs about 7 500 people in the United States Over 50 percent of those people are skilled workers including plant operators drivers mechanics and maintenance techs We hire approximately 550 new employees in the United States each year and around 90 percent require technical skills There is a mismatch between the demand and supply of skilled workers Work opportunities exist but sometimes it is difficult to find people to fill those jobs Air Products has openings but we can t always find people with the right skills in the right locations This situation contributes to the national unemployment rate of over 8 percent Creating a new technology workforce Filling the skills gap will require higher expectations and greater investment in education and job training Technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace We need technicians that are not just mechanically trained but who can operate electronic control systems and sophisticated predictive maintenance technologies That means government must provide more support for CTE directing additional funding so that schools community colleges and technical schools can continue their great work and strengthen and expand quality CTE programs Our nation s future I cannot stress enough the importance of CTE to the U S economy Not only do CTE programs help the new generation of workers with developing technical skills they create well rounded employees with 21st century employability skills problem solving teamwork and leadership to help them grow and succeed throughout the lifetime of their entire career Industries are eager to collaborate with schools and colleges that help foster the workforce of our next generation We realize that we must develop strategic partnerships between industry and education to bring the best thinking and most current learning experiences to schools and colleges In doing so we can create future career opportunities for millions of Americans How Can

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=6519 (2016-01-08)
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