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  • Inside International CTE: Papua New Guinea « NASDCTEc Blog
    there is a common perception that a basic education must be offered first before they can even begin thinking about integrating 21 st century skills Yet making a quality 21 st century education a pillar of an expanding system provides opportunities to leapfrog those that are still focused on outdated models such as a narrow focus on academic knowledge and rote memorization which result in limited dividends for their students and future workforce A Complex Set of Challenges Now I am by no means an expert on Papua New Guinea PNG after my short visit but I did do some background research and had the chance to talk with people representing all walks of life bus drivers government officials a lawyer who handles domestic abuse cases a rampant issue in the country a recently graduated university student an expat business owner and people who had moved from the provinces to the city looking for a job and a better way to live One recurring theme of these conversations is that jobs and government services including education and health care are in short supply and in some rural areas extremely limited Many people live in extreme poverty and the word corruption came up on more than one occasion Yet Papua New Guinea is also a land rich in natural resources development is improving the economy and leading to some infrastructure development such as new roads around the capital However there has not been much investment in human resources a challenge the government is looking to address through new education initiatives including an expansion of vocational education and training VET which I will cover in my next post Educating for Global Competence With development comes an increased interest in putting Papua New Guinea onto the world stage In addition to the APEC dialogue on human resource development which functioned as a practice run for 2018 when Papua New Guinea will be hosting numerous annual APEC meetings and the APEC ministerial convening PNG is hosting the Pan Pacific Games this summer In an era of globalization the government is promoting some progressive ideas including global education and frameworks for responsible sustainable development Nowhere is there a better argument for teaching global competency than Papua New Guinea due to the diversity within its borders and its aspirations to emerge on the world stage Global competency has been recognized by the government and was clearly reflected in the priorities of the previous National Curriculum culture and community language mathematics personal development and science It stated in part The curriculum will prepare students who are more flexible for a changing world its principles are based on significant cultural social and educational values and beliefs such as i bilingual education education in vernaculars and English ii citizenship roles rights and responsibilities in society iii law and order good governance and iv lifelong learning applied learning The National Curriculum is inclusive and designed to meet the needs of all students irrespective of their abilities gender geographic locations cultural

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=11669 (2016-01-08)
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  • Papua New Guinea « NASDCTEc Blog
    process led by the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations that involves boards of industry specific experts The certificates students earn aligned to these standards are recognized nationally based on the National Qualifications Framework During the APEC meeting there was much discussion of whether APEC should work toward a regional qualifications framework an idea that PNG endorsed Regional Cooperation This month marks the beginning of a Memorandum of Understanding signed between PNG and the Philippines to provide assistance on building capacity at VET colleges Such agreements are not unique to PNG during the APEC discussions Australia presented on the work it has been doing on building qualification frameworks with other countries in the region And Singapore is often providing technical assistance to emerging vocational systems Apprenticeships Creating or expanding access to apprenticeship programs that work well with industry and provide training in a technical college is a goal of many education systems today across the globe mdash including in economies much more advanced than PNG s The program that Pom Tech has established seems to be popular well supported and running smoothly via a partnership created between government and industry Papua New Guinea has far to go they are eager to learn from others and are opening up to the world Notably they are focused on not only developing their natural resources but also developing their human resources To meet this goal they are beginning to integrate innovative practices mdash including global competence and expansion of VET mdash into their education systems which can provide an inspiring example for others including more developed countries Read part one on how Papua New Guinea prioritizes global competence in education Follow Heather on Twitter Photo courtesy of the author By Katie Fitzgerald in Uncategorized Tags Papua New Guinea Inside International CTE Papua New Guinea Monday June 29th 2015 Heather Singmaster visited Papua New Guinea and discusses the educational system s challenges and some ways the government is implementing innovative solutions This is part of our ongoing series examining international education systems in partnership with Asia Society s Global Learning blog on EdWeek Before heading to Papua New Guinea to speak at the APEC High Level Policy Dialogue on Human Resource Development in the capital Port Moresby last month my American peers asked me many things Will you see natives with faces painted like skulls Did you know they have the world s largest species of rat Isn t it one of the poorest countries in the world What I found is a country that yes is very poor and facing what may seem to be overwhelming challenges But despite these Papua New Guinea is taking positive steps to address them including a budget that is focused on the pillars of health education infrastructure development and increased funding direct to the provinces And while the vision of dancing natives is what the country is known for it should also be known for the fact that it is one of the most culturally diverse countries

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=papua-new-guinea (2016-01-08)
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  • Inside International CTE: Netherlands Part II « NASDCTEc Blog
    secondary education The Dutch government hopes to increase the success of students in their first career choice both for pedagogical and financial reasons Currently secondary schools are monitored and rated based on exams This reliance on results has led to students taking subjects in which they are comfortable and confident for the test rather than the subject that will help them in their chosen field of study Furthermore exams can easily miss some essential skills like discipline motivation and collaboration In addition when students are preparing for post secondary level of education there are an abundance of choices without much guidance so students often turn to their parents for advice but they are also unclear about CTE fields of study To address these challenges the government has made career guidance a requirement of secondary education and schools are experimenting with how to accomplish this new task This includes teacher trainings on career guidance to help them understand what skills their students need and site visits to organizations and colleges What are some of the Netherlands successful initiatives in Career Technical Education A broader curriculum In 2002 an initiative was launched with schools to develop a broader technical curriculum In partnership with 10 schools we developed concepts and practices to make the curriculum attractive to students with various career and educational desires including students interested in pure technical fields those who want to apply technical solutions in human services and those who prefer to go into the business sector Participating schools had to agree to deliver this curriculum successfully with a small number of students to start The schools were provided the opportunity to experiment and pilot the curriculum and after a year of preparation and two years of practice we followed the first group of students moving into tertiary or postsecondary education We found that these students did as well or better than the traditional groups of students With these results we developed a global curriculum and instruction for student exams With the support of our stakeholders the Government accepted the results and put it into legislation The 10 original schools formed a platform helping other schools implement this approach and guiding further development Currently over 100 schools have adopted this curriculum and are fully supported by legislation with the support of the platform and stakeholders In 2007 a group of entrepreneurs had several observations First that a group of students were interested in high quality and attractive CTE but the number of schools providing that kind of education were closing or forced to decrease the number of their departments Second the perception of CTE was very poor After getting support from schools and businesses I was asked to lead an initiative Vakcollege which focused on career knowledge early on for students and would aim to change the perception surrounding CTE We developed three promises for stakeholders For the students we aimed to develop attractive education towards an occupation diploma and job for the companies involved a new generation of

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=11616 (2016-01-08)
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  • Netherlands « NASDCTEc Blog
    I was asked to lead an initiative Vakcollege which focused on career knowledge early on for students and would aim to change the perception surrounding CTE We developed three promises for stakeholders For the students we aimed to develop attractive education towards an occupation diploma and job for the companies involved a new generation of technicians and craftsmen and for the schools our goal is that together we make a difference We started a company and in 2008 partnered with 13 schools each with its own assemblage of business partners We pushed boundaries of what legislation allowed but found out that to our own surprise the Dutch system allows schools to change their vision and mission towards more CTE as long as they stay within the boundaries of the various streams The initiative has been widely accepted This summer the company will be replaced by a foundation with 50 schools as members dedicated to furthering the development of Vakcollege Technasium Another successful program we have is Technasium which began as an elective choice for students offered in the school gymnasium In this free space schools offered a new subject they called Research Development for the more scientific and technical interested students This idea was crucial because it offered CTE to students in higher streams something that these students were not typically exposed to The most academically gifted pupils were given a chance to explore their talents and interests in CTE fields Furthermore the goal of this initiative was not to develop a standard curriculum but to work on interesting and innovative questions posed by local companies and businesses in eight week projects and present the student solutions to professionals from the companies Instead of a typical test student assessment is on their research solution creativity presentation and collaboration A foundation has been created that helps schools develop a Technasium program and works closely with the government to set the standards on which schools can join and are allowed to offer exams in Research Development Though these initiatives may have different outcomes they share the same ambition of developing education meeting the needs of the students involved contributing to lasting careers and helping to provide a pipeline of students with the skills industry needs Katie Fitzgerald Communications Associate By Katie Fitzgerald in Uncategorized Tags Netherlands Inside International CTE Netherlands Tuesday June 2nd 2015 This interview with Martin van Os an educational advisor explores the CTE VET system in the Netherlands Van Os began his career as a physics teacher became a school principal coordinated the national in service courses for science and technology was the senior organizational advisor for the National Center for Urban School Improvement worked for government on secondary vocational education and was founding director of the Vakcollege support company This interview was conducted by Katie Fitzgerald of NASDCTEc in part of our ongoing series examining international education systems in partnership with Asia Society s Global Learning blog on EdWeek Check out part two on Thursday PART 1 Exploring

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=netherlands (2016-01-08)
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  • Inside International CTE: Netherlands « NASDCTEc Blog
    technology energy creative industry high tech and life and health To continue to excel in these areas Netherlands will need 30 000 people with the proper educational skills each year to account for job replacement and industry growth Currently the educational system is categorized by streams where students are tagged as low intermediate or high performing The big challenge is that not enough students choose a technical area of study in post secondary education Research shows that the perception among students is that technical courses are difficult and a career in a technical field is dull After primary education a student can participate in secondary education within seven different streams although many secondary schools combine them Still this many options for pupils at the age of 12 is a unique feature of our system Regardless of a student s categorization as belonging to a certain stream our system is focused on providing pupils with the education that meets their needs which has resulted in a very low dropout rate Despite the low dropout rate we have little upwards mobility in the school system in a time where we need everyone to reach their highest potential In addition secondary CTE is typically taken by students with lower academic achievement while the academic track is taken by students who perform at a higher level This has resulted in a very negative perception and has made promoting CTE difficult Another cause of this negative perception is the improvement in primary education and the ambition and pressure from parents resulting in fewer students enrolling in the CTE streams and more in the academic paths Also academic pathways include little focus on Career Technical Education While the traditional pathways through secondary schools for vocational education are decreasing in participation we had hoped CTE in the academic route would develop As this has not happened it has left us with a skills gap and a sense of urgency Please describe the current landscape of Career Technical Education VET in the Netherlands Overall there has been a decline in CTE participation and in particular a strong drop in the traditional courses for technicians and craftsmanship However there is some growing interest in newer courses which combine technical education with entrepreneurship skills The two trends combined means CTE enrollment in the upper grades has stayed somewhat consistent over time A little over a third of third year secondary students engage in CTE out of about 200 000 students in total Another opportunity is that more of our students are eligible for technical or science programs in higher education particularly in the higher streams even if they are not choosing CTE programs at this time In fact the economic crisis was a big boost for students actually choosing technical and scientific careers This is all to say there is potential for more students to choose CTE at the secondary and postsecondary levels Every system has its challenges what are yours What are some solutions you are looking to implement

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=11611 (2016-01-08)
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  • Inside International CTE: Australia « NASDCTEc Blog
    trade sectors They are not aligned against individual workplaces but are sufficiently flexible to enable trainers to contextualize their programs to meet the needs of local and regional employers Students skills and knowledge can then be assessed on the job and under realistic working conditions Once students meet the standards whether through the studies they undertake as part of the course or by bringing forward skills and knowledge they gained elsewhere they receive the same certification as someone who entered the training program directly Please describe the landscape of Career Technical Education VET in Australia What percentage of the student population is a CTE VET student Students in Australia completing their secondary studies go either directly to university as undergraduates or into the labor market Therefore under law all students must take part in VET studies either integrated with their academic subjects or as stand alone apprenticeships or trainee programs as part of their secondary education VET is taught in schools as a means of giving all students part or all of a vocational qualification certificate prior to entry into the workforce Like the U S each state in Australia has a slightly different approach to VET where some schools have comprehensive VET programs which they run themselves or programs which are conducted by an external training organisation and provide students with real workplace experience Regardless of where the program is conducted the standards remain the same across the country What sectors fields of study does it encompass Which are most popular with students The Australian VET CTE system encompasses almost every trade para professional or professional field found in the workplace The only areas not covered are those for which students must attend university to study such as engineering medicine and dentistry Therefore students are able to study any subject they wish just so long as the school has the capacity to support them The choice of fields usually depends on student interest and the competencies required in those areas where they intend to seek work For example in rural areas subjects of study such as agriculture water control horticulture transportation and nursing are very popular while in urban locals subjects such as IT and management tend to attract the most students There are also a lot of international students studying in Australia and they pursue skills that they can utilize when they return to their home countries How is CTE VET funded in Australia publicly privately by federal or local funds etc Funding for VET comes from three sources For VET in secondary school programs funding comes from the state government and is subsidized by families and in some cases employers who train and assess students in the workplace National programs such as programs for unemployed people and the socially disadvantaged are funded by the state government as a study assistance loan This means the costs of the VET program must be paid back when the individual graduates and earns above a certain wage This is in effect

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=11541 (2016-01-08)
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  • Australia « NASDCTEc Blog
    skills and knowledge required within individual industries and are created to meet the needs of specific industries and trade sectors They are not aligned against individual workplaces but are sufficiently flexible to enable trainers to contextualize their programs to meet the needs of local and regional employers Students skills and knowledge can then be assessed on the job and under realistic working conditions Once students meet the standards whether through the studies they undertake as part of the course or by bringing forward skills and knowledge they gained elsewhere they receive the same certification as someone who entered the training program directly Please describe the landscape of Career Technical Education VET in Australia What percentage of the student population is a CTE VET student Students in Australia completing their secondary studies go either directly to university as undergraduates or into the labor market Therefore under law all students must take part in VET studies either integrated with their academic subjects or as stand alone apprenticeships or trainee programs as part of their secondary education VET is taught in schools as a means of giving all students part or all of a vocational qualification certificate prior to entry into the workforce Like the U S each state in Australia has a slightly different approach to VET where some schools have comprehensive VET programs which they run themselves or programs which are conducted by an external training organisation and provide students with real workplace experience Regardless of where the program is conducted the standards remain the same across the country What sectors fields of study does it encompass Which are most popular with students The Australian VET CTE system encompasses almost every trade para professional or professional field found in the workplace The only areas not covered are those for which students must attend university to study such as engineering medicine and dentistry Therefore students are able to study any subject they wish just so long as the school has the capacity to support them The choice of fields usually depends on student interest and the competencies required in those areas where they intend to seek work For example in rural areas subjects of study such as agriculture water control horticulture transportation and nursing are very popular while in urban locals subjects such as IT and management tend to attract the most students There are also a lot of international students studying in Australia and they pursue skills that they can utilize when they return to their home countries How is CTE VET funded in Australia publicly privately by federal or local funds etc Funding for VET comes from three sources For VET in secondary school programs funding comes from the state government and is subsidized by families and in some cases employers who train and assess students in the workplace National programs such as programs for unemployed people and the socially disadvantaged are funded by the state government as a study assistance loan This means the costs of the VET program

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?tag=australia (2016-01-08)
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  • Inside International CTE: Switzerland Part Two « NASDCTEc Blog
    Society s Global Learning blog on Ed Week Many consider the Swiss system one of the best in the world But every system has its challenges what are yours What are some solutions you are looking to implement There are specific areas we have identified as challenges and solutions we are pursuing Demographic changes We have an aging workforce and not enough students to replace them in the VET system Therefore we are looking at ways to re tool all employees and raise their productivity with further education Potential perception issues We continue to fear that too many parents will insist their children pursue a university pathway instead of the VET pathway thereby weakening the economy something experienced by Denmark which also had a strong apprenticeship program An international dialog and exchange of knowledge on the importance of VET competences to close the 21 st century middle skills gap is one of the solutions to this problem Another route is to connect the worldwide community of scholars and experts which could provide the evidence and the rationale for well balanced educational diversity Globalization The increase of international companies working in Switzerland threatens the VET system These companies do not have a tradition of VET and are therefore less supportive of the system It is very important to launch an information campaign for multi national companies and newcomers to Switzerland who are not familiar with the VET system so that they can understand the comparatively outstanding outcomes of our VET system What do you think the future of VET CTE in your country looks like I am confident our VET system will evolve in line with the changes in the world of work because of the role industry associations play in defining curriculum content and educational standards These partners will continue to adapt those frameworks to meet the future needs of their industries every three to five years Due to the fact that technology forward companies often advance such revisions small to medium size companies will continue to profit from spillover effects because they too will have to apply the best available technology if they would like to offer an apprenticeship We also anticipate apprenticeships forming in new and additional industries if there is a need due to the high flexibility of our system What advice do you have for other systems attempting to reform their VET CTE systems What are some of the policies in Switzerland that could assist others in overcoming the challenges they face in VET CTE That s maybe the most difficult question There is no simple solution for other countries One has to take into consideration the context and ecosystem of a country But there is one crucial aspect which should be carefully analyzed What is the link between education and employment systems e g governance curriculum design and curriculum application According to my experience most countries that are trying to reform their CTE VET system are struggling with this issue and do not know how

    Original URL path: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=11449 (2016-01-08)
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