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  • Category:NEGOTIATION - Peacebuilding
    4 891 views Shall We Negotiate 4 882 views Too Many People To Deal With 4 713 views Gromit Village Representative 4 470 views Situation and Roles 4 372 views Trucks 4 371 views Workers Payoff 4 285 views Cuolo Village Representative 4 245 views Rules 4 177 views Fargo Village Representative 4 010 views Emotions in Negotiation 3 983 views And Then How Do We Proceed 3 932 views Brainstorming on Confrontation to Cooperation 3 856 views Ergo Village Representative 3 627 views And Then How Should We Proceed 3 584 views Modules 6th Module Negotiation Conflict and Culture 13 912 views 2nd Module Positional bargaining and principled negotiation 12 422 views 4th Module Turning confrontation into cooperation 9 731 views 1st Module Cooperation and Competition Conflict Styles and Outcomes 9 573 views 3rd Module Principled Negotiation 8 503 views Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views 5th Module How emotions play in negotiation 4 616 views Workshop Agendas Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views Case Histories Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views Handouts Introduction to Principled Negotiation 8 073 views Emotions and Concerns 7 356 views Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views Other Conflict Handling Styles 33 490 views Keeping a Cultural Perspective in Reconciliation Work 3 970 views Pages in category NEGOTIATION The following 50 pages are in this category out of 50 total 1 1st Module Cooperation and Competition Conflict Styles and Outcomes 2 2nd Module Positional bargaining and principled negotiation 3 3rd Module Principled Negotiation 4 4th Module Turning confrontation into cooperation 5 5th Module How emotions play in negotiation 6 6th Module Negotiation Conflict and Culture A Acting Bargaining And Then How Do We Proceed And Then How Should We Proceed B Brainstorming on Confrontation to Cooperation

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php?title=Category:NEGOTIATION&printable=yes (2016-02-13)
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  • Category:NEGOTIATION - Peacebuilding
    Writing Short Plays 5 231 views Questions Exploring Cultures Approach to Negotiation 5 106 views Dealing with Emotions 4 891 views Shall We Negotiate 4 882 views Too Many People To Deal With 4 713 views Gromit Village Representative 4 470 views Situation and Roles 4 372 views Trucks 4 371 views Workers Payoff 4 285 views Cuolo Village Representative 4 245 views Rules 4 177 views Fargo Village Representative 4 010 views Emotions in Negotiation 3 983 views And Then How Do We Proceed 3 932 views Brainstorming on Confrontation to Cooperation 3 856 views Ergo Village Representative 3 627 views And Then How Should We Proceed 3 584 views Modules 6th Module Negotiation Conflict and Culture 13 912 views 2nd Module Positional bargaining and principled negotiation 12 422 views 4th Module Turning confrontation into cooperation 9 731 views 1st Module Cooperation and Competition Conflict Styles and Outcomes 9 573 views 3rd Module Principled Negotiation 8 503 views Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views 5th Module How emotions play in negotiation 4 616 views Workshop Agendas Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views Case Histories Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views Handouts Introduction to Principled Negotiation 8 073 views Emotions and Concerns 7 356 views Half Day Workshop on Negotiation 5 953 views Other Conflict Handling Styles 33 490 views Keeping a Cultural Perspective in Reconciliation Work 3 970 views Pages in category NEGOTIATION The following 50 pages are in this category out of 50 total 1 1st Module Cooperation and Competition Conflict Styles and Outcomes 2 2nd Module Positional bargaining and principled negotiation 3 3rd Module Principled Negotiation 4 4th Module Turning confrontation into cooperation 5 5th Module How emotions play in negotiation 6 6th Module Negotiation Conflict and Culture A Acting Bargaining

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php?title=Category:NEGOTIATION&oldid=491 (2016-02-13)
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  • Nonviolence Resource Kit - Intro - Peacebuilding
    and practices the fall of dictatorships the repeal of unjust laws and the rise of democratic governments However examples of nonviolence date back almost 2 500 years ago Despite the widespread use of nonviolence throughout history historians and formal education systems seem to give priority to documenting wars and violence As a result of this reduced attention nonviolence is still an unrefined raw and intuitive technique for struggle whereas the focus on and investment in military war has significantly increased its destructive power Looking at history and examples of nonviolent struggle can help raise awareness of its nature and the way it works and boost confidence 3rd Module Power and Consent The theory of power that most nonviolent groups refer to can be attributed to the nonviolence theorist Gene Sharp Sharp has developed a theory of power that can serve as a framework for understanding how nonviolence works Essentially it states that the members of a society can be divided into rulers and subjects The rulers power is dependent on the goodwill decisions and support of the subjects thus political power is pluralistic and fragile Withdrawal of consent by the subjects is a way to challenge political power and let hidden structural conflicts surface 4th Module More on Power One way to oppose Gene Sharp s theory of power and consent is to highlight its naivety Consent is seen as individualistic and voluntaristic and his theory leaves out much of the complexity of political life Social structures such as capitalism patriarchy and bureaucracy are too complex to fit into the ruler subject picture Thus for the purposes of social analysis a structural approach seems more appropriate for understanding the complex dynamics of a society Nevertheless if the purpose of a theory is to provide some insights that can be used by activists and prepare a group for action then a simple and easy to apply theory serves well That s why Sharp s theory is so successful among nonviolent activists around the world This module is concerned with offering a critical approach to Sharp s theory of power and with providing different perspectives on power 5th Module Strategising for Nonviolence Whilst social movements can gain strength from the passion focus and cohesion of their members the ability to strategise their actions can also significantly increase their effectiveness Nonviolent theorists and movements have developed a number of frameworks that a group can use to build its own strategy Here we present some of these frameworks although it should be borne in mind that these are not prescriptive and any group can develop its own strategy in its own way Simplicity and participation are the two key elements rather than studying elaborate frameworks to develop the perfect strategy it s better to use simple tools that anyone can understand It s also best to do things together Activists will become active if they play a part in decision making 6th Module Nonviolence in Church Sources The Church s views on peace and

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php/Nonviolence_Resource_Kit_-_Intro (2016-02-13)
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  • Five Pros, Five Cons - Peacebuilding
    into two parts by drawing a line down the middle On the top left write Nonviolence Pros and on the top right Nonviolence Cons III Define the task Each team has 10 minutes to write down the five most important points in favour of nonviolence and the five most important points against nonviolence IV Start group work and allow ten minutes to complete the task V Stop group work and ask the groups to hang their flip charts on the wall VI Give each participant six Post it notes Tell them they have five minutes to read the lists of Pros and Cons on all the flip charts and then stick their Post it notes on what they believe are the most relevant Pros and Cons demonstrate to make sure they ve understood They can use three Post it notes for the Pros and three for the Cons VII Count the Post it notes and write up a list with the most important Pros and Cons Debriefing The basic question here is Why Why do you think that this point is important Why do you think it is more important than this one and so on Retrieved from http peacebuilding

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php/Five_Pros%2C_Five_Cons (2016-02-13)
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  • The Ideal Community - Peacebuilding
    a new task Each of them is the CEO of a major multinational corporation Give each volunteer a tie and ask them to wear them the tie symbolises their status VII Brief the volunteers The corporation is doing very well and is now expanding its activities and interests They have an expansion plan that will involve the ideal community Ask the CEOs to use their imagination Give some examples such as building a large mall in the middle of the community or an ultra modern building right in the historical centre of the village or building a highway that will cross the city or building a chemical plant that will pollute the air of the community or a drive in MacDonalds They return to the groups in their new role communicate and advocate in favour of their plans take markers and draw them within the ideal community VIII The task of the members of the ideal community the groups is to devise a nonviolent strategy and actions that will prevent the multinational corporation from disrupting their community Allow sufficient time for group discussion IX Ask the groups to communicate and implement their actions drawing X Ask the CEOs to respond to the actions of the ideal community and pursue their expansion plan XI Repeat the procedure in steps IX and X as long as you find it useful Debriefing The following questions and structure for debriefing are not prescriptive You can add delete or change as necessary How do you feel How do you feel about this activity How do you feel about your community How do you feel as members of the community after the multinational corporation intervened How do you feel about the CEO How do you feel as a CEO How do you feel about your nonviolent strategy and actions What happened What happened at the beginning of the activity when you visualised your ideal community What have you done that was effective in preventing the corporation from taking over your community What was ineffective How did you choose what to do What was the process for making decisions What was your goal What was your strategy What have you learnt What was the most important learning point from this activity for you What have you learnt about nonviolent activism What have you learnt about strategy What have you learnt about group cohesion What is the difference between goal strategy and tactics What are the basic ingredients to win over an opponent who has considerable power e g power of money power of influence over politicians power of persuading communities e g creating jobs control over media and the extended public opinion Who has power in this activity What kind of power How do you win in this case How does this relate How does this activity relate to your real life How can you apply learning points about strategy with your group in real life What is the difference between goal strategy and tactics with your

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php/The_Ideal_Community (2016-02-13)
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  • Defining Power - Peacebuilding
    sailed through the preliminaries The finals were held up on the hill of Kwetu Forest overlooking the Waterfall of Hope The five finalists were Lion Elephant Monkey Giraffe and Human As usual the competitors arrived with their supporters Monkey was the first to turn up No one quite saw how Monkey arrived because he was jumping from branch to branch It looked spectacular as the entire Monkey family arrived like a well choreographed circus Next was Lion who dislikes ceremonial and arrived only with his wife He looked around proudly as he stepped into the arena Elephant and Giraffe are rather close friends and arrived almost at the same time Elephant was chewing a branch while Giraffe was nibbling some sweet leaves Human arrived last and came alone with an object dangling from his waist The master of ceremonies Squirrel announced that the competition was to begin According to the rules competitors were allowed to step into the arena as soon as they felt ready Elephant went first and demonstrated her power by digging a large hole throwing up lots of dust and making a lot of noise Giraffe came next and did a rather poor variation of her dance of power but the melody sounded nice She danced around gracefully and then sat down Monkey weighed in with his acrobatic jumps from branch to branch but not many animals seemed impressed Lion roared to demonstrate his power Few animals were afraid as they d heard this roar many times before Last came the new competitor Human Human stepped into the arena and looked around The animals fell silent Slowly Human untied something from his waist and raised it Loud bangs followed Suddenly almost every other competitor was bleeding Lion was limping and Monkey scampered away with blood oozing from

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php/Defining_Power (2016-02-13)
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  • Our Value System for Nonviolence - Peacebuilding
    Vegetarianism Support for the death penalty Support for corporal punishment in schools Obedience of authority Equality of women in society Freedom of thought Inviolability of the dignity of every fellow human being Freedom of speech Etc V Ask participants to form groups of 4 7 individuals Distribute a flip chart with a target to each group See the example below INSERT IMAGE HERE VI Each group s task is to develop their own value system By looking at the flip charts with all the lists of identified values they should choose the values they agree on and position them within the target with core values in the inner circle secondary values in the middle circle and marginal values in the outer circle If necessary give this definition of value system A value system is in essence the ordering and prioritisation of the ethical and ideological values that an individual or society holds While two individuals or groups may share a set of common values they may differ in their determination of which values in that set have precedence over others In essence a value system if sufficiently well defined is a formalisation of a moral code http en wikipedia org wiki Value system VII Start group work Allow sufficient time and give help if needed VIII After group work return to the plenary and debrief Debriefing The following question are only suggestions Feel free to omit supplement and change them as you see fit How do we prioritise values Why do some values take precedence over others How important is it to base our nonviolent engagement on values What happens when we have to work with people who don t share the same value system as ours How should we deal with different value systems if we are to engage

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php/Our_Value_System_for_Nonviolence (2016-02-13)
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  • Countering Obedience - Peacebuilding
    of resistance would you likely encounter How would you deal with that Etc IV End group work Ask each group to pair up with another one and discuss the results of their work Allow sufficient time but try to encourage a quick exchange as the procedure will be repeated V Repeat step IV as necessary in order to allow each group to become familiar with different explanations for obedience and ways of opposing them Handouts The following content is adapted from Sharp Gene The Politics of Nonviolent Action Power and Struggle Part One Boston Porter Sargent 2000 1973 pp 19 25 You can divide the following into two or more handouts in accordance with requirements You can even use one handout for each point Why do people obey Habit One reason why people obey is that obedience has long been practised by humanity or by a specific group society and has become a habit Therefore people may accept obedience as such simply because it s well established behaviour Fear of Sanctions Sanctions generally involve the threat or use of some form of physical violence against disobedient people These are especially effective when they are incorporated in the law or practice of the state The use of sanctions is an exercise of coercive power and operates on people s fears Moral Obligation The Common Good of Society People may feel a moral obligation to obey A moral obligation might be partly a product of the normal process by which individuals absorb the customs ways and beliefs of their society as they grow up and partly the result of deliberate indoctrination Moral obligation may originate from a belief that constraint by government is for the common good of society Moral Obligation Superhuman Factors People may feel a moral obligation to obey A moral obligation might be partly a product of the normal process by which individual absorb the customs ways and beliefs of their society as they grow up and partly the result of deliberate indoctrination Moral obligation may originate from an identification of the lawgiver or ruler with superhuman qualities powers or principles which make disobedience inconceivable such as in theocracies Moral Obligation Legitimacy of the Command People may feel a moral obligation to obey A moral obligation might be partly a product of the normal process by which individual absorb the customs ways and beliefs of their society as they grow up and partly the result of deliberate indoctrination Moral obligation may originate from a belief in the legitimacy of the command originated from the official position of who is commanding by his being in accordance with tradition or law or by respecting the established procedure for commanding Moral Obligation Conformity of Commands to Accepted Norms People may feel a moral obligation to obey A moral obligation might be partly a product of the normal process by which individual absorb the customs ways and beliefs of their society as they grow up and partly the result of deliberate indoctrination Moral

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php/Countering_Obedience (2016-02-13)
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