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  • Changes related to "Introduction to Principled Negotiation" - Peacebuilding
    logged in users Hide my edits Show new changes starting from 00 25 13 February 2016 Namespace all Main Talk User User talk Peacebuilding Peacebuilding talk Image Image talk MediaWiki MediaWiki talk Template Template talk Help Help talk Category Category talk Invert selection Page name Show changes to pages linked to the given page instead Introduction to Principled Negotiation No changes on linked pages during the given period Retrieved from

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  • Introduction to Principled Negotiation - Peacebuilding
    Behind positions are multiple interests and focusing on interests allows negotiators more room to generate solutions acceptable to all parties 3 Invent options for mutual gain This requires creativity and the commitment to brainstorm options that will be acceptable to both parties In brainstorming negotiators need to separate the stage of evaluating options from the stage of generating options Both parties need to broaden the number of possible options and not search for just one option Both parties also need to think about options that will satisfy the interests of the other side 4 Insist on using objective or mutually acceptable criteria Often it is possible to identify several relevant standards or criteria by which parties can evaluate the fairness or acceptability of a negotiated agreement Negotiators can brainstorm criteria or standards in the same way as they brainstorm options Fisher and Ury also invented the concept of the BATNA This is a term that refers to the Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement An alternative is different than an option it refers to a possible course of action if you do not reach a negotiated agreement The BATNA functions as your bottom line as a negotiator and helps you determine whether or not negotiation is your best option In order to make a BATNA useful negotiators need to carefully analyse the costs and benefits of the BATNA and to evaluate costs and benefits of the negotiated agreement against those of the BATNA If individuals or groups think they can accomplish their bottom line using other methods e g like a strike violence legal options they will resort to those methods and not use a cooperative model of negotiation This model of negotiation is presented with several caveats First this is a culturally specific model of negotiation developed originally for

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  • Introduction to Principled Negotiation - Peacebuilding
    individuals and groups often state only one position It is usually difficult to negotiate compromises on positions Behind positions are multiple interests and focusing on interests allows negotiators more room to generate solutions acceptable to all parties 3 Invent options for mutual gain This requires creativity and the commitment to brainstorm options that will be acceptable to both parties In brainstorming negotiators need to separate the stage of evaluating options from the stage of generating options Both parties need to broaden the number of possible options and not search for just one option Both parties also need to think about options that will satisfy the interests of the other side 4 Insist on using objective or mutually acceptable criteria Often it is possible to identify several relevant standards or criteria by which parties can evaluate the fairness or acceptability of a negotiated agreement Negotiators can brainstorm criteria or standards in the same way as they brainstorm options Fisher and Ury also invented the concept of the BATNA This is a term that refers to the Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement An alternative is different than an option it refers to a possible course of action if you do not reach a negotiated agreement The BATNA functions as your bottom line as a negotiator and helps you determine whether or not negotiation is your best option In order to make a BATNA useful negotiators need to carefully analyse the costs and benefits of the BATNA and to evaluate costs and benefits of the negotiated agreement against those of the BATNA If individuals or groups think they can accomplish their bottom line using other methods e g like a strike violence legal options they will resort to those methods and not use a cooperative model of negotiation This model of negotiation

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php?title=Introduction_to_Principled_Negotiation&oldid=322 (2016-02-13)
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  • View source - Peacebuilding
    understand the other s point of view to find merit in what the other thinks feels or does to communicate your understanding through words or actions 2 Affiliation Adversarial assumptions dominate many negotiations and prevent negotiators from doing as well as they could Dealing with differences is better done when working together Thus building affiliation with the other can make a negotiation easier and more productive There are two types of affiliation Structural connections The links that you have with someone based on the roles you play in the same group e g same age both with kids common interests etc Explore and use this connections to build affiliation Personal connections These are personal ties There are several things that you could do to connect at a personal level e g meet face to face rather than via phone or e mail discuss things you care about 3 Autonomy We feel bad when others make decisions for ourselves when they try to limit our autonomy beyond what we think is appropriate The same goes for others when what we do is limiting their autonomy There are two things you can do to address this concern Expand your autonomy Try not to limit the other person s autonomy 4 Status Status is our standing in relation to that of others When others try to demean our status we may feel frustrated ashamed or angry bad feelings about ourselves and others arise with have a potential to harm to let us act unwisely and diminish our capacity to reach a wise a satisfactory agreement There are two things that you can do to address this concern Become aware of your social and particular status Your social status might be inferior to that of a political leader or to that of UN diplomat

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php?title=Emotions_and_Concerns&action=edit (2016-02-13)
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  • Revision history of "Emotions and Concerns" - Peacebuilding
    2009 Deepmike Talk contribs 4 621 bytes New page You feel emotions all the time especially when you negotiate You can be so busy thinking at the interests at stake that you fail to acknowledge your and the others emotions when Latest Earliest View newer 50 older 50 20 50 100 250 500 Retrieved from http peacebuilding caritas org index php Emotions and Concerns Views Page Discussion View source History

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  • Emotions and Concerns - Peacebuilding
    or does to communicate your understanding through words or actions 2 Affiliation Adversarial assumptions dominate many negotiations and prevent negotiators from doing as well as they could Dealing with differences is better done when working together Thus building affiliation with the other can make a negotiation easier and more productive There are two types of affiliation Structural connections The links that you have with someone based on the roles you play in the same group e g same age both with kids common interests etc Explore and use this connections to build affiliation Personal connections These are personal ties There are several things that you could do to connect at a personal level e g meet face to face rather than via phone or e mail discuss things you care about 3 Autonomy We feel bad when others make decisions for ourselves when they try to limit our autonomy beyond what we think is appropriate The same goes for others when what we do is limiting their autonomy There are two things you can do to address this concern Expand your autonomy Try not to limit the other person s autonomy 4 Status Status is our standing in relation to that of others When others try to demean our status we may feel frustrated ashamed or angry bad feelings about ourselves and others arise with have a potential to harm to let us act unwisely and diminish our capacity to reach a wise a satisfactory agreement There are two things that you can do to address this concern Become aware of your social and particular status Your social status might be inferior to that of a political leader or to that of UN diplomat But there are other fields where you enjoy high status these can be education connections moral

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php?title=Emotions_and_Concerns&printable=yes (2016-02-13)
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  • Emotions and Concerns - Peacebuilding
    person to understand the other s point of view to find merit in what the other thinks feels or does to communicate your understanding through words or actions 2 Affiliation Adversarial assumptions dominate many negotiations and prevent negotiators from doing as well as they could Dealing with differences is better done when working together Thus building affiliation with the other can make a negotiation easier and more productive There are two types of affiliation Structural connections The links that you have with someone based on the roles you play in the same group e g same age both with kids common interests etc Explore and use this connections to build affiliation Personal connections These are personal ties There are several things that you could do to connect at a personal level e g meet face to face rather than via phone or e mail discuss things you care about 3 Autonomy We feel bad when others make decisions for ourselves when they try to limit our autonomy beyond what we think is appropriate The same goes for others when what we do is limiting their autonomy There are two things you can do to address this concern Expand your autonomy Try not to limit the other person s autonomy 4 Status Status is our standing in relation to that of others When others try to demean our status we may feel frustrated ashamed or angry bad feelings about ourselves and others arise with have a potential to harm to let us act unwisely and diminish our capacity to reach a wise a satisfactory agreement There are two things that you can do to address this concern Become aware of your social and particular status Your social status might be inferior to that of a political leader or to that of

    Original URL path: http://peacebuilding.caritas.org/index.php?title=Emotions_and_Concerns&oldid=314 (2016-02-13)
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  • Error
    to Home Retrieved from http peacebuilding caritas org index php Special Upload Views Special Personal tools 91 105 69 17 Talk for this IP Log in create account Navigation Homepage Contents Help pages Random page About this site Search CARITAS French version Spanish version Contact us Caritas website Donate online My collection Show collection 115 pages Collections help User collections The category contains more than PARAM pages only the first

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