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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    in your power to show great strength and who can withstand the strength of your arm 107 You are merciful to all for you can do all thing 108 270 God is the Father Almighty whose fatherhood and power shed light on one another God reveals his fatherly omnipotence by the way he takes care of our needs by the filial adoption that he gives us I will be a father to you and you shall be my sons and daughters says the Lord Almighty 109 finally by his infinite mercy for he displays his power at its height by freely forgiving sins 271 God s almighty power is in no way arbitrary In God power essence will intellect wisdom and justice are all identical Nothing therefore can be in God s power which could not be in his just will or his wise intellect 110 The mystery of God s apparent powerlessness 272 Faith in God the Father Almighty can be put to the test by the experience of evil and suffering God can sometimes seem to be absent and incapable of stopping evil But in the most mysterious way God the Father has revealed his almighty power in the voluntary humiliation and Resurrection of his Son by which he conquered evil Christ crucified is thus the power of God and the wisdom of God For the foolishness of God is wiser than men and the weakness of God is stronger than men 111 It is in Christ s Resurrection and exaltation that the Father has shown forth the immeasurable greatness of his power in us who believe 112 273 Only faith can embrace the mysterious ways of God s almighty power This faith glories in its weaknesses in order to draw to itself Christ s power 113 The

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    eBooks Connect Home On Facebook On Twitter eNewsletters Site Tour Web Widgets Feeds Contact Us Advertise Subscribe Login Donate Resources Home Library Website Reviews What You Need to Know Catholic Dictionary Catechism Church Fathers Most Collection Free eBooks Catechism of the Catholic Church He does whatever he pleases 104 269 The Holy Scriptures repeatedly confess the universal power of God He is called the Mighty One of Jacob the LORD of hosts the strong and mighty one If God is almighty in heaven and on earth it is because he made them 105 Nothing is impossible with God who disposes his works according to his will 106 He is the Lord of the universe whose order he established and which remains wholly subject to him and at his disposal He is master of history governing hearts and events in keeping with his will It is always in your power to show great strength and who can withstand the strength of your arm 107 Notes 104 Ps 115 3 105 Gen 49 24 Isa 1 24 etc Ps 24 8 10 135 6 106 Cf Jer 27 5 32 17 Lk 1 37 107 Wis 11 21 cf Esth 4 17b

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    Church Fathers Most Collection Free eBooks Connect Home On Facebook On Twitter eNewsletters Site Tour Web Widgets Feeds Contact Us Advertise Subscribe Login Donate Resources Home Library Website Reviews What You Need to Know Catholic Dictionary Catechism Church Fathers Most Collection Free eBooks Catechism of the Catholic Church You are merciful to all for you can do all thing 108 270 God is the Father Almighty whose fatherhood and power shed light on one another God reveals his fatherly omnipotence by the way he takes care of our needs by the filial adoption that he gives us I will be a father to you and you shall be my sons and daughters says the Lord Almighty 109 finally by his infinite mercy for he displays his power at its height by freely forgiving sins 271 God s almighty power is in no way arbitrary In God power essence will intellect wisdom and justice are all identical Nothing therefore can be in God s power which could not be in his just will or his wise intellect 110 Notes 108 Wis 11 23 109 2 Cor 6 18 cf Mt 6 32 110 St Thomas Aquinas STh I 25 5 ad

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    be absent and incapable of stopping evil But in the most mysterious way God the Father has revealed his almighty power in the voluntary humiliation and Resurrection of his Son by which he conquered evil Christ crucified is thus the power of God and the wisdom of God For the foolishness of God is wiser than men and the weakness of God is stronger than men 111 It is in Christ s Resurrection and exaltation that the Father has shown forth the immeasurable greatness of his power in us who believe 112 273 Only faith can embrace the mysterious ways of God s almighty power This faith glories in its weaknesses in order to draw to itself Christ s power 113 The Virgin Mary is the supreme model of this faith for she believed that nothing will be impossible with God and was able to magnify the Lord For he who is mighty has done great things for me and holy is his name 114 274 Nothing is more apt to confirm our faith and hope than holding it fixed in our minds that nothing is impossible with God Once our reason has grasped the idea of God s almighty power it will easily and without any hesitation admit everything that the Creed will afterwards propose for us to believe even if they be great and marvellous things far above the ordinary laws of nature 115 IN BRIEF 275 With Job the just man we confess I know that you can do all things and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted Job 42 2 276 Faithful to the witness of Scripture the Church often addresses her prayer to the almighty and eternal God omnipotens sempiterne Deus believing firmly that nothing will be impossible with God Gen 18 14

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    glory of God is man fully alive moreover man s life is the vision of God if God s revelation through creation has already obtained life for all the beings that dwell on earth how much more will the Word s manifestation of the Father obtain life for those who see God 139 The ultimate purpose of creation is that God who is the creator of all things may at last become all in all thus simultaneously assuring his own glory and our beatitude 140 IV THE MYSTERY OF CREATION God creates by wisdom and love 295 We believe that God created the world according to his wisdom 141 It is not the product of any necessity whatever nor of blind fate or chance We believe that it proceeds from God s free will he wanted to make his creatures share in his being wisdom and goodness For you created all things and by your will they existed and were created 142 Therefore the Psalmist exclaims O LORD how manifold are your works In wisdom you have made them all and The LORD is good to all and his compassion is over all that he has made 143 God creates out of nothing 296 We believe that God needs no pre existent thing or any help in order to create nor is creation any sort of necessary emanation from the divine substance 144 God creates freely out of nothing 145 If God had drawn the world from pre existent matter what would be so extraordinary in that A human artisan makes from a given material whatever he wants while God shows his power by starting from nothing to make all he wants 146 297 Scripture bears witness to faith in creation out of nothing as a truth full of promise and hope Thus the mother of seven sons encourages them for martyrdom I do not know how you came into being in my womb It was not I who gave you life and breath nor I who set in order the elements within each of you Therefore the Creator of the world who shaped the beginning of man and devised the origin of all things will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again since you now forget yourselves for the sake of his laws Look at the heaven and the earth and see everything that is in them and recognize that God did not make them out of things that existed Thus also mankind comes into being 147 298 Since God could create everything out of nothing he can also through the Holy Spirit give spiritual life to sinners by creating a pure heart in them 148 and bodily life to the dead through the Resurrection God gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist 149 And since God was able to make light shine in darkness by his Word he can also give the light of faith to those who do not yet know him 150 God creates an ordered and good world 299 Because God creates through wisdom his creation is ordered You have arranged all things by measure and number and weight 151 The universe created in and by the eternal Word the image of the invisible God is destined for and addressed to man himself created in the image of God and called to a personal relationship with God 152 Our human understanding which shares in the light of the divine intellect can understand what God tells us by means of his creation though not without great effort and only in a spirit of humility and respect before the Creator and his work 153 Because creation comes forth from God s goodness it shares in that goodness And God saw that it was good very good 154 for God willed creation as a gift addressed to man an inheritance destined for and entrusted to him On many occasions the Church has had to defend the goodness of creation including that of the physical world 155 God transcends creation and is present to it 300 God is infinitely greater than all his works You have set your glory above the heavens 156 Indeed God s greatness is unsearchable 157 But because he is the free and sovereign Creator the first cause of all that exists God is present to his creatures inmost being In him we live and move and have our being 158 In the words of St Augustine God is higher than my highest and more inward than my innermost self 159 God upholds and sustains creation 301 With creation God does not abandon his creatures to themselves He not only gives them being and existence but also and at every moment upholds and sustains them in being enables them to act and brings them to their final end Recognizing this utter dependence with respect to the Creator is a source of wisdom and freedom of joy and confidence For you love all things that exist and detest none of the things that you have made for you would not have made anything if you had hated it How would anything have endured if you had not willed it Or how would anything not called forth by you have been preserved You spare all things for they are yours O Lord you who love the living 160 V GOD CARRIES OUT HIS PLAN DIVINE PROVIDENCE 302 Creation has its own goodness and proper perfection but it did not spring forth complete from the hands of the Creator The universe was created in a state of journeying in statu viae toward an ultimate perfection yet to be attained to which God has destined it We call divine providence the dispositions by which God guides his creation toward this perfection By his providence God protects and governs all things which he has made reaching mightily from one end of the earth to the other and ordering

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    121 284 The great interest accorded to these studies is strongly stimulated by a question of another order which goes beyond the proper domain of the natural sciences It is not only a question of knowing when and how the universe arose physically or when man appeared but rather of discovering the meaning of such an origin is the universe governed by chance blind fate anonymous necessity or by a transcendent intelligent and good Being called God And if the world does come from God s wisdom and goodness why is there evil Where does it come from Who is responsible for it Is there any liberation from it 285 Since the beginning the Christian faith has been challenged by responses to the question of origins that differ from its own Ancient religions and cultures produced many myths concerning origins Some philosophers have said that everything is God that the world is God or that the development of the world is the development of God Pantheism Others have said that the world is a necessary emanation arising from God and returning to him Still others have affirmed the existence of two eternal principles Good and Evil Light and Darkness locked in permanent conflict Dualism Manichaeism According to some of these conceptions the world at least the physical world is evil the product of a fall and is thus to be rejected or left behind Gnosticism Some admit that the world was made by God but as by a watch maker who once he has made a watch abandons it to itself Deism Finally others reject any transcendent origin for the world but see it as merely the interplay of matter that has always existed Materialism All these attempts bear witness to the permanence and universality of the question of origins This inquiry is distinctively human 286 Human intelligence is surely already capable of finding a response to the question of origins The existence of God the Creator can be known with certainty through his works by the light of human reason 122 even if this knowledge is often obscured and disfigured by error This is why faith comes to confirm and enlighten reason in the correct understanding of this truth By faith we understand that the world was created by the word of God so that what is seen was made out of things which do not appear 123 287 The truth about creation is so important for all of human life that God in his tenderness wanted to reveal to his People everything that is salutary to know on the subject Beyond the natural knowledge that every man can have of the Creator 124 God progressively revealed to Israel the mystery of creation He who chose the patriarchs who brought Israel out of Egypt and who by choosing Israel created and formed it this same God reveals himself as the One to whom belong all the peoples of the earth and the whole earth itself he is the One

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    for the number of gifts this month Goal 1 000 769 to go Catechism of the Catholic Church II CREATION WORK OF THE HOLY TRINITY 290 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth 128 three things are affirmed in these first words of Scripture the eternal God gave a beginning to all that exists outside of himself he alone is Creator the verb create Hebrew bara always has God for its subject The totality of what exists expressed by the formula the heavens and the earth depends on the One who gives it being 291 In the beginning was the Word and the Word was God all things were made through him and without him was not anything made that was made 129 The New Testament reveals that God created everything by the eternal Word his beloved Son In him all things were created in heaven and on earth all things were created through him and for him He is before all things and in him all things hold together 130 The Church s faith likewise confesses the creative action of the Holy Spirit the giver of life the Creator Spirit Veni Creator Spiritus the source of every good 131 292 The Old Testament suggests and the New Covenant reveals the creative action of the Son and the Spirit 132 inseparably one with that of the Father This creative co operation is clearly affirmed in the Church s rule of faith There exists but one God he is the Father God the Creator the author the giver of order He made all things by himself that is by his Word and by his Wisdom by the Son and the Spirit who so to speak are his hands 133 Creation is the common work of the Holy Trinity

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    Church III THE WORLD WAS CREATED FOR THE GLORY OF GOD 293 Scripture and Tradition never cease to teach and celebrate this fundamental truth The world was made for the glory of God 134 St Bonaventure explains that God created all things not to increase his glory but to show it forth and to communicate it 135 for God has no other reason for creating than his love and goodness Creatures came into existence when the key of love opened his hand 136 The First Vatican Council explains This one true God of his own goodness and almighty power not for increasing his own beatitude nor for attaining his perfection but in order to manifest this perfection through the benefits which he bestows on creatures with absolute freedom of counsel and from the beginning of time made out of nothing both orders of creatures the spiritual and the corporeal 137 294 The glory of God consists in the realization of this manifestation and communication of his goodness for which the world was created God made us to be his sons through Jesus Christ according to the purpose of his will to the praise of his glorious grace 138 for the glory of God is man fully alive moreover man s life is the vision of God if God s revelation through creation has already obtained life for all the beings that dwell on earth how much more will the Word s manifestation of the Father obtain life for those who see God 139 The ultimate purpose of creation is that God who is the creator of all things may at last become all in all thus simultaneously assuring his own glory and our beatitude 140 Notes 134 Dei Filius can 5 DS 3025 135 St Bonaventure In II Sent I

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