archive-org.com » ORG » C » CATHOLICCULTURE.ORG

Total: 1401

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    of freedom are too often disregarded or violated Such situations of blindness and injustice injure the moral life and involve the strong as well as the weak in the temptation to sin against charity By deviating from the moral law man violates his own freedom becomes imprisoned within himself disrupts neighborly fellowship and rebels against divine truth 1741 Liberation and salvation By his glorious Cross Christ has won salvation for all men He redeemed them from the sin that held them in bondage For freedom Christ has set us free 34 In him we have communion with the truth that makes us free 35 The Holy Spirit has been given to us and as the Apostle teaches Where the Spirit of the Lord is there is freedom 36 Already we glory in the liberty of the children of God 37 1742 Freedom and grace The grace of Christ is not in the slightest way a rival of our freedom when this freedom accords with the sense of the true and the good that God has put in the human heart On the contrary as Christian experience attests especially in prayer the more docile we are to the promptings of grace the more we grow in inner freedom and confidence during trials such as those we face in the pressures and constraints of the outer world By the working of grace the Holy Spirit educates us in spiritual freedom in order to make us free collaborators in his work in the Church and in the world Almighty and merciful God in your goodness take away from us all that is harmful so that made ready both in mind and body we may freely accomplish your will 38 IN BRIEF 1743 God willed that man should be left in the hand of

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4949 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    action The intention is a movement of the will toward the end it is concerned with the goal of the activity It aims at the good anticipated from the action undertaken Intention is not limited to directing individual actions but can guide several actions toward one and the same purpose it can orient one s whole life toward its ultimate end For example a service done with the end of helping one s neighbor can at the same time be inspired by the love of God as the ultimate end of all our actions One and the same action can also be inspired by several intentions such as performing a service in order to obtain a favor or to boast about it 1753 A good intention for example that of helping one s neighbor does not make behavior that is intrinsically disordered such as lying and calumny good or just The end does not justify the means Thus the condemnation of an innocent person cannot be justified as a legitimate means of saving the nation On the other hand an added bad intention such as vainglory makes an act evil that in and of itself can be good such as almsgiving 39 1754 The circumstances including the consequences are secondary elements of a moral act They contribute to increasing or diminishing the moral goodness or evil of human acts for example the amount of a theft They can also diminish or increase the agent s responsibility such as acting out of a fear of death Circumstances of themselves cannot change the moral quality of acts themselves they can make neither good nor right an action that is in itself evil II GOOD ACTS AND EVIL ACTS 1755 A morally good act requires the goodness of the object of the end

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4961 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    good toward which the will deliberately directs itself It is the matter of a human act The object chosen morally specifies the act of the will insofar as reason recognizes and judges it to be or not to be in conformity with the true good Objective norms of morality express the rational order of good and evil attested to by conscience 1752 In contrast to the object the intention resides in the acting subject Because it lies at the voluntary source of an action and determines it by its end intention is an element essential to the moral evaluation of an action The end is the first goal of the intention and indicates the purpose pursued in the action The intention is a movement of the will toward the end it is concerned with the goal of the activity It aims at the good anticipated from the action undertaken Intention is not limited to directing individual actions but can guide several actions toward one and the same purpose it can orient one s whole life toward its ultimate end For example a service done with the end of helping one s neighbor can at the same time be inspired by the love of God as the ultimate end of all our actions One and the same action can also be inspired by several intentions such as performing a service in order to obtain a favor or to boast about it 1753 A good intention for example that of helping one s neighbor does not make behavior that is intrinsically disordered such as lying and calumny good or just The end does not justify the means Thus the condemnation of an innocent person cannot be justified as a legitimate means of saving the nation On the other hand an added bad

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4963 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    good act requires the goodness of the object of the end and of the circumstances together An evil end corrupts the action even if the object is good in itself such as praying and fasting in order to be seen by men The object of the choice can by itself vitiate an act in its entirety There are some concrete acts such as fornication that it is always wrong to choose because choosing them entails a disorder of the will that is a moral evil 1756 It is therefore an error to judge the morality of human acts by considering only the intention that inspires them or the circumstances environment social pressure duress or emergency etc which supply their context There are acts which in and of themselves independently of circumstances and intentions are always gravely illicit by reason of their object such as blasphemy and perjury murder and adultery One may not do evil so that good may result from it IN BRIEF 1757 The object the intention and the circumstances make up the three sources of the morality of human acts 1758 The object chosen morally specifies the act of willing accordingly as reason recognizes and judges it

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4969 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    love aroused by the attraction of the good Love causes a desire for the absent good and the hope of obtaining it this movement finds completion in the pleasure and joy of the good possessed The apprehension of evil causes hatred aversion and fear of the impending evil this movement ends in sadness at some present evil or in the anger that resists it 1766 To love is to will the good of another 41 All other affections have their source in this first movement of the human heart toward the good Only the good can be loved 42 Passions are evil if love is evil and good if it is good 43 II PASSIONS AND MORAL LIFE 1767 In themselves passions are neither good nor evil They are morally qualified only to the extent that they effectively engage reason and will Passions are said to be voluntary either because they are commanded by the will or because the will does not place obstacles in their way 44 It belongs to the perfection of the moral or human good that the passions be governed by reason 45 1768 Strong feelings are not decisive for the morality or the holiness of persons they are simply the inexhaustible reservoir of images and affections in which the moral life is expressed Passions are morally good when they contribute to a good action evil in the opposite case The upright will orders the movements of the senses it appropriates to the good and to beatitude an evil will succumbs to disordered passions and exacerbates them Emotions and feelings can be taken up into the virtues or perverted by the vices 1769 In the Christian life the Holy Spirit himself accomplishes his work by mobilizing the whole being with all its sorrows fears and sadness

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4977 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    PASSIONS 1763 The term passions belongs to the Christian patrimony Feelings or passions are emotions or movements of the sensitive appetite that incline us to act or not to act in regard to something felt or imagined to be good or evil 1764 The passions are natural components of the human psyche they form the passageway and ensure the connection between the life of the senses and the life of the mind Our Lord called man s heart the source from which the passions spring 40 1765 There are many passions The most fundamental passion is love aroused by the attraction of the good Love causes a desire for the absent good and the hope of obtaining it this movement finds completion in the pleasure and joy of the good possessed The apprehension of evil causes hatred aversion and fear of the impending evil this movement ends in sadness at some present evil or in the anger that resists it 1766 To love is to will the good of another 41 All other affections have their source in this first movement of the human heart toward the good Only the good can be loved 42 Passions are evil if love

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4979 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    themselves passions are neither good nor evil They are morally qualified only to the extent that they effectively engage reason and will Passions are said to be voluntary either because they are commanded by the will or because the will does not place obstacles in their way 44 It belongs to the perfection of the moral or human good that the passions be governed by reason 45 1768 Strong feelings are not decisive for the morality or the holiness of persons they are simply the inexhaustible reservoir of images and affections in which the moral life is expressed Passions are morally good when they contribute to a good action evil in the opposite case The upright will orders the movements of the senses it appropriates to the good and to beatitude an evil will succumbs to disordered passions and exacerbates them Emotions and feelings can be taken up into the virtues or perverted by the vices 1769 In the Christian life the Holy Spirit himself accomplishes his work by mobilizing the whole being with all its sorrows fears and sadness as is visible in the Lord s agony and passion In Christ human feelings are able to reach their consummation in charity and divine beatitude 1770 Moral perfection consists in man s being moved to the good not by his will alone but also by his sensitive appetite as in the words of the psalm My heart and flesh sing for joy to the living God 46 IN BRIEF 1771 The term passions refers to the affections or the feelings By his emotions man intuits the good and suspects evil 1772 The principal passions are love and hatred desire and fear joy sadness and anger 1773 In the passions as movements of the sensitive appetite there is neither moral good

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4984 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    man commits evil the just judgment of conscience can remain within him as the witness to the universal truth of the good at the same time as the evil of his particular choice The verdict of the judgment of conscience remains a pledge of hope and mercy In attesting to the fault committed it calls to mind the forgiveness that must be asked the good that must still be practiced and the virtue that must be constantly cultivated with the grace of God We shall reassure our hearts before him whenever our hearts condemn us for God is greater than our hearts and he knows everything 52 1782 Man has the right to act in conscience and in freedom so as personally to make moral decisions He must not be forced to act contrary to his conscience Nor must he be prevented from acting according to his conscience especially in religious matters 53 II THE FORMATION OF CONSCIENCE 1783 Conscience must be informed and moral judgment enlightened A well formed conscience is upright and truthful It formulates its judgments according to reason in conformity with the true good willed by the wisdom of the Creator The education of conscience is indispensable for human beings who are subjected to negative influences and tempted by sin to prefer their own judgment and to reject authoritative teachings 1784 The education of the conscience is a lifelong task From the earliest years it awakens the child to the knowledge and practice of the interior law recognized by conscience Prudent education teaches virtue it prevents or cures fear selfishness and pride resentment arising from guilt and feelings of complacency born of human weakness and faults The education of the conscience guarantees freedom and engenders peace of heart 1785 In the formation of conscience the Word of God is the light for our path 54 we must assimilate it in faith and prayer and put it into practice We must also examine our conscience before the Lord s Cross We are assisted by the gifts of the Holy Spirit aided by the witness or advice of others and guided by the authoritative teaching of the Church 55 III TO CHOOSE IN ACCORD WITH CONSCIENCE 1786 Faced with a moral choice conscience can make either a right judgment in accordance with reason and the divine law or on the contrary an erroneous judgment that departs from them 1787 Man is sometimes confronted by situations that make moral judgments less assured and decision difficult But he must always seriously seek what is right and good and discern the will of God expressed in divine law 1788 To this purpose man strives to interpret the data of experience and the signs of the times assisted by the virtue of prudence by the advice of competent people and by the help of the Holy Spirit and his gifts 1789 Some rules apply in every case One may never do evil so that good may result from it the Golden Rule

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=4994 (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •