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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    was blessed abundantly by the promises of God fulfilled in Isaac and who was purified by the test of the sacrifice 86 Hoping against hope he believed and thus became the father of many nations 87 1820 Christian hope unfolds from the beginning of Jesus preaching in the proclamation of the beatitudes The beatitudes raise our hope toward heaven as the new Promised Land they trace the path that leads through the trials that await the disciples of Jesus But through the merits of Jesus Christ and of his Passion God keeps us in the hope that does not disappoint 88 Hope is the sure and steadfast anchor of the soul that enters where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf 89 Hope is also a weapon that protects us in the struggle of salvation Let us put on the breastplate of faith and charity and for a helmet the hope of salvation 90 It affords us joy even under trial Rejoice in your hope be patient in tribulation 91 Hope is expressed and nourished in prayer especially in the Our Father the summary of everything that hope leads us to desire 1821 We can therefore hope in the glory of heaven promised by God to those who love him and do his will 92 In every circumstance each one of us should hope with the grace of God to persevere to the end 93 and to obtain the joy of heaven as God s eternal reward for the good works accomplished with the grace of Christ In hope the Church prays for all men to be saved 94 She longs to be united with Christ her Bridegroom in the glory of heaven Hope O my soul hope You know neither the day nor the hour Watch carefully for everything passes quickly even though your impatience makes doubtful what is certain and turns a very short time into a long one Dream that the more you struggle the more you prove the love that you bear your God and the more you will rejoice one day with your Beloved in a happiness and rapture that can never end 95 Charity 1822 Charity is the theological virtue by which we love God above all things for his own sake and our neighbor as ourselves for the love of God 1823 Jesus makes charity the new commandment 96 By loving his own to the end 97 he makes manifest the Father s love which he receives By loving one another the disciples imitate the love of Jesus which they themselves receive Whence Jesus says As the Father has loved me so have I loved you abide in my love And again This is my commandment that you love one another as I have loved you 98 1824 Fruit of the Spirit and fullness of the Law charity keeps the commandments of God and his Christ Abide in my love If you keep my commandments you will abide in my love

    Original URL path: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/catechism/index.cfm?recnum=5039 (2016-02-11)
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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    by which we believe in God and believe all that he has said and revealed to us and that Holy Church proposes for our belief because he is truth itself By faith man freely commits his entire self to God 78 For this reason the believer seeks to know and do God s will The righteous shall live by faith Living faith work s through charity 79 1815 The gift of faith remains in one who has not sinned against it 80 But faith apart from works is dead 81 when it is deprived of hope and love faith does not fully unite the believer to Christ and does not make him a living member of his Body 1816 The disciple of Christ must not only keep the faith and live on it but also profess it confidently bear witness to it and spread it All however must be prepared to confess Christ before men and to follow him along the way of the Cross amidst the persecutions which the Church never lacks 82 Service of and witness to the faith are necessary for salvation So every one who acknowledges me before men I also will acknowledge before my Father

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    so as to order them to the Kingdom of heaven it keeps man from discouragement it sustains him during times of abandonment it opens up his heart in expectation of eternal beatitude Buoyed up by hope he is preserved from selfishness and led to the happiness that flows from charity 1819 Christian hope takes up and fulfills the hope of the chosen people which has its origin and model in the hope of Abraham who was blessed abundantly by the promises of God fulfilled in Isaac and who was purified by the test of the sacrifice 86 Hoping against hope he believed and thus became the father of many nations 87 1820 Christian hope unfolds from the beginning of Jesus preaching in the proclamation of the beatitudes The beatitudes raise our hope toward heaven as the new Promised Land they trace the path that leads through the trials that await the disciples of Jesus But through the merits of Jesus Christ and of his Passion God keeps us in the hope that does not disappoint 88 Hope is the sure and steadfast anchor of the soul that enters where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf 89 Hope is also a weapon that protects us in the struggle of salvation Let us put on the breastplate of faith and charity and for a helmet the hope of salvation 90 It affords us joy even under trial Rejoice in your hope be patient in tribulation 91 Hope is expressed and nourished in prayer especially in the Our Father the summary of everything that hope leads us to desire 1821 We can therefore hope in the glory of heaven promised by God to those who love him and do his will 92 In every circumstance each one of us should

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    were still enemies 100 The Lord asks us to love as he does even our enemies to make ourselves the neighbor of those farthest away and to love children and the poor as Christ himself 101 The Apostle Paul has given an incomparable depiction of charity charity is patient and kind charity is not jealous or boastful it is not arrogant or rude Charity does not insist on its own way it is not irritable or resentful it does not rejoice at wrong but rejoices in the right Charity bears all things believes all things hopes all things endures all things 102 1826 If I have not charity says the Apostle I am nothing Whatever my privilege service or even virtue if I have not charity I gain nothing 103 Charity is superior to all the virtues It is the first of the theological virtues So faith hope charity abide these three But the greatest of these is charity 104 1827 The practice of all the virtues is animated and inspired by charity which binds everything together in perfect harmony 105 it is the form of the virtues it articulates and orders them among themselves it is the source and the goal of their Christian practice Charity upholds and purifies our human ability to love and raises it to the supernatural perfection of divine love 1828 The practice of the moral life animated by charity gives to the Christian the spiritual freedom of the children of God He no longer stands before God as a slave in servile fear or as a mercenary looking for wages but as a son responding to the love of him who first loved us 106 If we turn away from evil out of fear of punishment we are in the position of slaves If

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    who receive them They make the faithful docile in readily obeying divine inspirations Let your good spirit lead me on a level path 110 For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God If children then heirs heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ 111 1832 The fruits of the Spirit are perfections that the Holy Spirit forms in us as the first fruits of eternal glory The tradition of the Church lists twelve of them charity joy peace patience kindness goodness generosity gentleness faithfulness modesty self control chastity 112 IN BRIEF 1833 Virtue is a habitual and firm disposition to do good 1834 The human virtues are stable dispositions of the intellect and the will that govern our acts order our passions and guide our conduct in accordance with reason and faith They can be grouped around the four cardinal virtues prudence justice fortitude and temperance 1835 Prudence disposes the practical reason to discern in every circumstance our true good and to choose the right means for achieving it 1836 Justice consists in the firm and constant will to give God and neighbor their due 1837 Fortitude ensures firmness in difficulties and constancy in the pursuit of the good 1838 Temperance moderates the attraction of the pleasures of the senses and provides balance in the use of created goods 1839 The moral virtues grow through education deliberate acts and perseverance in struggle Divine grace purifies and elevates them 1840 The theological virtues dispose Christians to live in a relationship with the Holy Trinity They have God for their origin their motive and their object God known by faith God hoped in and loved for his own sake 1841 There are three theological virtues faith hope and charity They inform all the moral virtues

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    knowledge and deliberate consent 131 1858 Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man Do not kill Do not commit adultery Do not steal Do not bear false witness Do not defraud Honor your father and your mother 132 The gravity of sins is more or less great murder is graver than theft One must also take into account who is wronged violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger 1859 Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act of its opposition to God s law It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart 133 do not diminish but rather increase the voluntary character of a sin 1860 Unintentional ignorance can diminish or even remove the imputability of a grave offense But no one is deemed to be ignorant of the principles of the moral law which are written in the conscience of every man The promptings of feelings and passions can also diminish the voluntary and free character of the offense as can external pressures or pathological disorders Sin committed through malice by deliberate choice of evil is the gravest 1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom as is love itself It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace that is of the state of grace If it is not redeemed by repentance and God s forgiveness it causes exclusion from Christ s kingdom and the eternal death of hell for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever with no turning back However although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God 1862 One commits venial sin when in a less serious matter he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter but without full knowledge or without complete consent 1863 Venial sin weakens charity it manifests a disordered affection for created goods it impedes the soul s progress in the exercise of the virtues and the practice of the moral good it merits temporal punishment Deliberate and unrepented venial sin disposes us little by little to commit mortal sin However venial sin does not break the covenant with God With God s grace it is humanly reparable Venial sin does not deprive the sinner of sanctifying grace friendship with God charity and consequently eternal happiness 134 While he is in the flesh man cannot help but have at least some light sins But do not despise these sins which we call light if you take them for light when you weigh them tremble when you count them A number of light objects makes a great mass a number of drops fills a river a number of grains makes a heap What then is our hope Above all confession 135 1864 Therefore I tell you every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven men but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven 136 There are no limits to the mercy of God but anyone who deliberately refuses to accept his mercy by repenting rejects the forgiveness of his sins and the salvation offered by the Holy Spirit 137 Such hardness of heart can lead to final impenitence and eternal loss V THE PROLIFERATION OF SIN 1865 Sin creates a proclivity to sin it engenders vice by repetition of the same acts This results in perverse inclinations which cloud conscience and corrupt the concrete judgment of good and evil Thus sin tends to reproduce itself and reinforce itself but it cannot destroy the moral sense at its root 1866 Vices can be classified according to the virtues they oppose or also be linked to the capital sins which Christian experience has distinguished following St John Cassian and St Gregory the Great They are called capital because they engender other sins other vices 138 They are pride avarice envy wrath lust gluttony and sloth or acedia 1867 The catechetical tradition also recalls that there are sins that cry to heaven the blood of Abel 139 the sin of the Sodomites 140 the cry of the people oppressed in Egypt 141 the cry of the foreigner the widow and the orphan 142 injustice to the wage earner 143 1868 Sin is a personal act Moreover we have a responsibility for the sins committed by others when we cooperate in them by participating directly and voluntarily in them by ordering advising praising or approving them by not disclosing or not hindering them when we have an obligation to do so by protecting evil doers 1869 Thus sin makes men accomplices of one another and causes concupiscence violence and injustice to reign among them Sins give rise to social situations and institutions that are contrary to the divine goodness Structures of sin are the expression and effect of personal sins They lead their victims to do evil in their turn In an analogous sense they constitute a social sin 144 IN BRIEF 1870 God has consigned all men to disobedience that he may have mercy upon all Rom 11 32 1871 Sin is an utterance a deed or a desire contrary to the eternal law St Augustine Faust 22 PL 42 418 It is an offense against God It rises up against God in a disobedience contrary to the obedience of Christ 1872 Sin is an act contrary to reason It wounds man s nature and injures human solidarity 1873 The root of all sins lies in man s heart The kinds and the gravity of sins are determined principally by their objects 1874 To choose deliberately that is both knowing it and willing it something gravely contrary to the divine law and to the ultimate end

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    114 The same is true of the Eucharist the sacrament of redemption This is my blood of the covenant which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins 115 1847 God created us without us but he did not will to save us without us 116 To receive his mercy we must admit our faults If we say we have no sin we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us If we confess our sins he is faithful and just and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness 117 1848 As St Paul affirms Where sin increased grace abounded all the more 118 But to do its work grace must uncover sin so as to convert our hearts and bestow on us righteousness to eternal life through Jesus Christ ourLord 119 Like a physician who probes the wound before treating it God by his Word and by his Spirit casts a living light on sin Conversion requires convincing of sin it includes the interior judgment of conscience and this being a proof of the action of the Spirit of truth in man s inmost being becomes at the same time the start of

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  • Catechism of the Catholic Church | Catholic Culture
    by a perverse attachment to certain goods It wounds the nature of man and injures human solidarity It has been defined as an utterance a deed or a desire contrary to the eternal law 121 1850 Sin is an offense against God Against you you alone have I sinned and done that which is evil in your sight 122 Sin sets itself against God s love for us and turns our hearts away from it Like the first sin it is disobedience a revolt against God through the will to become like gods 123 knowing and determining good and evil Sin is thus love of oneself even to contempt of God 124 In this proud self exaltation sin is diametrically opposed to the obedience of Jesus which achieves our salvation 125 1851 It is precisely in the Passion when the mercy of Christ is about to vanquish it that sin most clearly manifests its violence and its many forms unbelief murderous hatred shunning and mockery by the leaders and the people Pilate s cowardice and the cruelty of the soldiers Judas betrayal so bitter to Jesus Peter s denial and the disciples flight However at the very hour of darkness

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