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  • Liturgical Year : Recipes : Condiment, Sauce, Gravy, Spread (Food Category) | Catholic Culture
    Blog February Calendar February Overview Lent Overview Prayers Activities Recipes Action Alert SOLIDARITY MONTH 10 is as good as 1 000 Help set a new record for the number of gifts this month Goal 1 000 769 to go Catholic Recipes Condiment Sauce Gravy Spread Food Category Showing 68 items Aioli Garlic Mayonnaise Almond Butter Sauce Apple Sauce Asparagus Vinaigrette Béchamel Sauce Blue Cheese Salad Dressing Boiled Dressing Cardamom Dressing Carp in Grey Sauce Cheese Sauce Chicken Salad with Sherry Dressing Christmas Eve Salad Claret Sauce for Broccoli Cocktail Sauce Cold Salmon with Green Sauce Cranberry Sauce Creole Sauce I Creole Sauce II Creole Sauce III Cucumber Sauce Curry Sauce Drawn Butter Egg and Caper Sauce Egg and Parsley Sauce Egg Sauce Ethiopian Spice Mix Berbere Fish Chowder Fresh Tomato Sauce Fruit Salad Dressing Garlic Butter for Snails Halibut in Pine Nut Sauce Herb Garden Salad Dressing Herb Salad Dressing Herb Vinegar Hollandaise Sauce Hollandaise Sauce Jellied Pig s Head Lasagne Sauce Lemon Butter Lobster Sauce Louis Dressing Maitre d Hotel Butter Marinade for Sliced Tomatoes Meatless Sauce Meatless Spaghetti Sauce Mission Olives and Meyer Lemon Relish Mostarda di Cremona Mushroom Almond Sauce Omelet Neapolitan Paprika Fish Pimiento Sauce Plain

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  • Liturgical Year : Recipes : Preserving, Canning, Jelly, Jam, Marmalade (Food Category) | Catholic Culture
    Home Library Website Reviews What You Need to Know Catholic Dictionary Catechism Church Fathers Most Collection Free eBooks Connect Home On Facebook On Twitter eNewsletters Site Tour Web Widgets Feeds Contact Us Advertise Subscribe Login Donate Liturgical Year Home Today Blog February Calendar February Overview Lent Overview Prayers Activities Recipes Catholic Recipes Preserving Canning Jelly Jam Marmalade Food Category Showing 7 items Flower and Herb Crafts and Recipes Lattwaerrick Parsley

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  • Liturgical Year : Recipes : Casseroles, Stews, Meat Pies (Food Category) | Catholic Culture
    Twitter eNewsletters Site Tour Web Widgets Feeds Contact Us Advertise Subscribe Login Donate Liturgical Year Home Today Blog February Calendar February Overview Lent Overview Prayers Activities Recipes Catholic Recipes Casseroles Stews Meat Pies Food Category Showing 60 items Australian Beefsteak and Kidney Pie Austrian Goulash Baked Beans and Beef Baked Macaroni and Cheese Baked Shells with Cheese Baked Ziti Beef Goulash Beef in Beer Buckwheat Groats and Mushrooms Cassoulet Chicken and Vegetable Pie Chicken Cacciatore Chicken Pot Pie Chicken Stew with Dumplings Chicken with Rice Coquilles Saint Jacques II Corn Meal Meat Pie County Cork Irish Stew Recipe Deviled Egg Casserole Doro Wot Ethiopian Stew Endives Braisees en Casserole Farfalle with Sausage Peppers Fish Potato Casserole French Style Shepherd s Pie Ham a la King on Corn Bread Squares Hopi Corn Stew Hot Shrimp Loaf Hungarian Goulash Iberian Bean Chowder Macedoine of Vegetables Mafé Marseilles Fish Stew Middle Eastern Rice with Black Beans and Chickpeas Mock Hasenpfeffer Moussaka New England Chicken and Oyster Pie Old Fashioned Bean Soup Paella I Polish Noodles Poor Man s Feast Quiche Lorraine Salmon Vegetable Shortcake Savarin Oyster Stew Scalloped Ham and Potatoes Scalloped Potatoes and Scallops Scalloped Salmon Shellfish en Coquille Shrimp Inez Shrimp

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  • Liturgical Year : Recipes : Gelatin Mold (Food Category) | Catholic Culture
    Dictionary Catechism Church Fathers Most Collection Free eBooks Connect Home On Facebook On Twitter eNewsletters Site Tour Web Widgets Feeds Contact Us Advertise Subscribe Login Donate Liturgical Year Home Today Blog February Calendar February Overview Lent Overview Prayers Activities Recipes Action Alert SOLIDARITY MONTH 10 is as good as 1 000 Help set a new record for the number of gifts this month Goal 1 000 769 to go Catholic

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  • Library : God's Justice Is Mercy | Catholic Culture
    to this vocation which calls us to actively imitate the tireless work of the Father and Jesus who the Gospel says are ever active cf Jn 5 17 I would like to suggest three words that can help us The first is education To educate means to draw out It is the capacity to draw forth the best from one s heart It is not just about teaching some technical skill or imparting ideas but is about rendering both ourselves and the world around us more human And it refers in a special way to work we need to formulate a new humanism of work For we live in a time when workers are being exploited in a time where work is not really at the service of personal dignity but is slave labour We must form educate in a new humanism of work where man and not profit is at the centre where the economy serves man rather than it being served by man Another aspect is important education helps people not to believe in the deception of those who would like to convince them that work one s daily effort the gift of oneself and one s study do not have value I would add that today in the world of work and in every environment it is essential to educate and follow the luminous and demanding path of honesty avoiding the shortcuts of favouritism and recommendations There is underlying corruption here There are always these temptations large or small but it always pertains to moral commerce which is unworthy of man it must be rejected by habituating the heart to remain free Otherwise it creates a false and noxious mentality which must be fought that of lawlessness which leads to the corruption of people and of society Lawlessness is like an octopus in hiding it is concealed submerged but with its tentacles it seizes and poisons polluting and doing so much harm Educating is a great vocation as St Joseph trained Jesus in the art of carpentry you too are called to help the younger generations to discover the beauty of truly human work The second word I would like to impart to you is sharing Work is not only a vocation of the individual person but an opportunity to enter into relationships with others Underlying every form of work is a concept of the relationship which we can and must have with what is other than ourselves Encyclical Letter Laudato Si n 125 Work should unite people not separate them rendering them closed and distant Occupying so many hours in the day it also offers us the opportunity to share everyday life to take an interest in those who are at our side to receive the presence of others as a gift and a responsibility In his written testimony Giovanni spoke of a form of sharing that is implemented in your Movement Civil Service Plans which enable you to approach people and new contexts making their

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  • Library : The Eucharist and Care for Creation | Catholic Culture
    the Holy Father reminds us Christ s saving death and resurrection has overcome the sin and death we inherited from Adam and Eve To accomplish this God the Father sent us his Son like us in all things but sin The Pope reminds us Jesus is the face of the Father s mercy Jesus accomplished our redemption and reconciliation he buys us back from a state sin and he makes us one with God each other and all creation Jesus achieved all of this in obedience to his Father s will and in doing so overcame the disobedience of Adam Where sin abounded after the sin of Adam now mercy abounds the more through the sacrifice of God s very own Son the second Adam Rom 5 20 and 1 Cor 15 45 Christ s act of obedience as the new Adam led to his death and resurrection By redeeming us with his own blood in effect Christ took the fear and pain out of suffering and death and by accepting suffering and death led us to a new kind of life in and through the resurrection God the Father established that the death and resurrection of His Son would be the way we would be saved We share in Christ s death and resurrection in and through the act of the Eucharist Through the Eucharist we offer back this saving sacrifice to the Father Dining on the Eucharistic bread and cup is how we participate in the paschal mystery and the saving sacrifice of Christ in the Eucharist Let us examine the dynamic of the bread and wine used in this sacrament A premise of the celebration of sacramental liturgy is that we use the good things from this earth to worship God They have been given to us by the God of all creation and they are the fruit of the earth Almost all the liturgies we celebrate involve the earth and our companions on the earth For example the welcoming of the light of day and acknowledging the shadows of evening shape Morning and Evening Prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours We use water in baptism Why Because it is the only primal element in the universe except air without which we cannot live Is it any wonder that the water that sustains human life is the element we use to initiate us into the very life of God our entrance to eternal life But there is another level of meaning behind the use of bread and wine at the Eucharist These gifts are from the earth but are also the result of human work Work here means human ingenuity productivity and manufacture which literally means something made by hand That some central elements used in the liturgy are the work of human hands like oil as well as bread and wine respects humans ingenuity to produce things that literally reproduce in themselves the paschal process of dying and rising As Pope Francis reminds us in Laudato si humans are to have dominion over the earth cf Gen 1 28 to till it and keep it Gen 2 15 He deepens these assertions by saying We are not God The earth was here before us and it has been given to us This allows us to respond to the charge that Judaeo Christian thinking on the basis of the Genesis account which grants man dominion over the earth cf Gen 1 28 has encouraged the unbridled exploitation of nature by painting him as domineering and destructive by nature This is not a correct interpretation of the Bible as understood by the Church n 67 He then asserts that Gen 2 5 tilling refers to cultivating ploughing or working while keeping means caring protecting overseeing and preserving This implies a relationship of mutual responsibility between human beings and nature Each community can take from the bounty of the earth whatever it needs for subsistence but it also has the duty to protect the earth and to ensure its fruitfulness for coming generations This is part of the theology that underlies our working with fellow creatures to manufacture bread and wine for the Eucharist There is a rich theology of creation in reflecting on the bread ness of the bread and the wine ness of the wine we consume in the Eucharist Among the things we offer in the Eucharist as the work of human hands is the sweat of the human brow Cardinal Basil Hume former archbishop of Westminster London England once remarked no work no Mass Part of its being a sacrament is the human work which makes all the things we will use for the Eucharist especially bread and wine So the worship and honour we offer to God in the Eucharist starts long before the liturgy in church begins It commences in the liturgy of human life as blessed by God with humans planting harvesting baking and wine making and delivering these gifts to the church for the Eucharist The talents we humans have for thought and work fashion what we need to celebrate the Eucharist What we are and use outside of the liturgy is brought into the act of liturgy to be transformed Simply put what lies behind the manufacture of the bread and wine for the Eucharist is that they are paschal processes There is a dying and rising in planting harvesting baking or fermenting all of which comprise the foundation for the celebration of the Paschal mystery in the Eucharist and for our participation in the dying and rising of Christ in and through the Eucharist In effect there is an important link between the paschal process involved in manufacturing bread and wine and the fact that dining on consecrated bread and wine is the uniquely Eucharistic means we have to participate in Christ s paschal dying and rising In a parallel way we can say that there is a spirituality derived from every act of the Eucharist because what we do at Mass shapes our lives A chief aspect of all Eucharistic participation is to allow the paschal dying and rising enacted through what occurs at the altar table to be the true measure of anything that is of real value in life The challenge is twofold First it is to allow what we enact in the Eucharist to be the measure of our lives In effect we are to view life through the lens of the paschal mystery which mystery helps us evaluate what is important in life It is this lens that allows us to look at apparent defeats sickness suffering and setbacks in life even death itself and to evaluate them against the paschal mystery Secondly a requisite consequence of Eucharistic enactment is to share the goods of this earth with the poor and the needy This takes us back to the Encyclical Food Distribution and Just Working Conditions Food Distribution and Diakonia In Laudato si the Holy Father links a theology of ecology with food distribution especially for the poor In a very poignant section of the encyclical the Pope offers us a piercing challenge not to say condemnation by asserting that we know that approximately a third of all food produced is discarded and whenever food is thrown out it is as if it were stolen from the table of the poor iv This phrase is reminiscent of the challenge offered by some Latin American theologians when they state that you cannot celebrate the Eucharist with stolen bread This reference to food brings us back to the celebration of the Eucharist where the presentation of gifts of bread and wine on the altar represent the collecting of gifts to be distributed to the poor The first summary description of the way the early Christians celebrated the Eucharist comes to us from St Justin the Martyr in the middle of the second century He notes that the wealthy offer gifts for the poor at the time of the presentation of the Eucharistic gifts The custom of having deacons collect and distribute these gifts is attested in liturgical literature through the time when the permanent diaconate faded from the practice of the Roman Church One of the contributions of the restored permanent diaconate is evident in the relationship of the deacon s service at the altar and in a life of service outside of Mass especially to the poor the marginalized the imprisoned the disenfranchised What the deacon does in the liturgy connects with what he does outside the liturgy This very ministry images for us the kind of ministerial life which Eucharistic participation presumes The Eucharist as the body of Christ unifies the church and it should challenge us to abandon some of the selfishness in life in favour of self giving and surrender of the self so that others may eat and be cared for by the same Lord Christ s paschal victory began with his humble acceptance of suffering and death The deacon s ministry reflects the Lord when it is humble service at the altar and in all of life as a consequence of what occurs at the altar table Like all good church ministry the deacon s ministry is meant to show all of us how we should live our lives in service both in the liturgy celebrated in church and in the living out of that liturgy in the liturgy of life In effect this is to say that the deacons are the permanent personification of the intrinsic relationship of liturgy and life and the Eucharist specifically as the summit and source of the Christian life The diaconate is not the only important restoration The presentation of gifts for the poor has been restored as an important part of the celebration of the Eucharist at the Evening Mass of the Lord s Supper on Holy Thursday It is both a traditional practice and a reminder of how the celebration of the Eucharist links sanctuary and marketplace altar and dining at home consecration of bread and wine and feeding and sheltering the poor and the homeless Indeed taking and collecting of gifts for the Eucharist always implies the sharing of some of those gifts with the poor and needy The symbolism of the deacon as one who ministers both at the altar and to the poor outside the liturgy personifies and exemplifies this ritual To share one s talents and offerings at the Eucharist reflects one s talents and generosity to others outside the celebration of the Eucharist From the perspective of sacramentality as articulated here we can say that there is a keen interrelationship between preparing and sharing food at the Eucharist with sharing food in everyday life especially at the daily and domestic ritual of taking meals together Just Working Conditions The articulation of the phrase work of human hands is a constant reminder that the Eucharistic liturgy derives from creatures on the earth and that human work is noble and part of human self expression At the same time it can also be an important reminder that all humans share in the dignity of being daughters and sons of God and deserve both humane working conditions and a living wage for their work As early as Pope Leo XIII s encyclical Rerum Novarum 1891 the official magisterium of the Catholic Church has insisted on a just wages and working conditions Because these teachings have never been fully implemented to our widespread shame more recent papal teachings reiterate and deepen what Leo taught These include Pope Paul VI in 1972 Octogesima Adveniens Pope John Paul II in 1991 Centesimus Annus and Benedict XVI in 2009 Caritas in Veritate This relationship is at the heart of Pope John Paul II encyclical in 1981 on human work Laborem Exercens In addition to human suffering caused by human action unfair work practices can also impoverish the earth itself Again our Holy Father cites pollution deforestation and ecological imbalances that result from unjust practices For example the Pope speaks this way about pollution in Laudato si n 20 Some forms of pollution are part of people s daily experience Exposure to atmospheric pollutants produces a broad spectrum of health hazards especially for the poor and causes millions of premature deaths People take sick for example from breathing high levels of smoke from fuels used in cooking or heating There is also pollution that affects everyone caused by transport industrial fumes substances which contribute to the acidification of soil and water fertilizers insecticides fungicides herbicides and agrotoxins in general Technology which linked to business interests is presented as the only way of solving these problems in fact proves incapable of seeing the mysterious network of relations between things and so sometimes solves one problem only to create others v This leads to his now often used phrase the throwaway culture Here the Pope combines a critique of unchecked free market approaches to the economy that destroy this good earth with a challenge to us all personally about the ways we use and abuse our companions on the earth plants animals the earth itself Another aspect of the Holy Father s concern for humanity regards leisure in general and the Sabbath in particular vi In fact this concern reaches back to when he was archbishop in Buenos Aires as reflected in the Latin American Bishops Conference document on evangelization in 2007 vii The requirement of the Sabbath observance derives from the Old Testament and is a hallmark of Jewish observance to this day That it begins at table in the evening by invoking Lord God of all creation is again poignant and rich for us Jews and Christians theologically There is a fairly new shopping centre just outside of the New Gate in the city of Jerusalem It has numerous stores and is a remarkable architectural achievement What is very poignant especially for a western Christian is to see the neon sign that says 24 6 That is the Sabbath in present day up in lights But as we all know the Sabbath rest is not that simple especially in a 24 7 Internet culture I wonder whether the sweatshops where mass produced goods result in a de humanization of too many of our brothers and sisters are replaced in other cultures with the electronic sweatshops of our Internet machines that lead to an equally de humanized society As Joseph Pieper asked in his book Leisure the Basis of Culture what is the basis of our culture without the presumption of leisure which leisure led to personal integration and societal cohesion Prophetically and poignantly Pope Francis takes this to another level when he speaks of the Internet in Laudato si n 47 and the quality of human relationships The Sunday celebration of the Eucharist is meant to be framed by leisure the kind of sacred leisure that the Sabbath prescriptions insured To celebrate the Eucharist with and for each other is integral to the kind of human ecology which popes have called for since St John Paul II and the integral ecology so forcefully argued by Pope Francis in Laudato si viii 237 On Sunday our participation in the Eucharist has special importance Sunday like the Jewish Sabbath is meant to be a day which heals our relationships with God with ourselves with others and with the world Sunday is the day of the Resurrection the first day of the new creation whose first fruits are the Lord s risen humanity the pledge of the final transfiguration of all created reality It also proclaims man s eternal rest in God In this way Christian spirituality incorporates the value of relaxation and festivity We tend to demean contemplative rest as something unproductive and unnecessary but this is to do away with the very thing which is most important about work its meaning We are called to include in our work a dimension of receptivity and gratuity which is quite different from mere inactivity Rather it is another way of working which forms part of our very essence It protects human action from becoming empty activism it also prevents that unfettered greed and sense of isolation which make us seek personal gain to the detriment of all else Significance of the Celebration of the Eucharist We see that the gathering and making by humans for the Eucharist are linked to the sacramentality of all of life We see how the Eucharist continues Christ s paschal victory via death and resurrection This combination of life and death positive and negative puts the world into proper perspective as both graced filled and flawed and in need of complete redemption Our Eucharistic liturgy prevents us from becoming too optimistic about the world Yet sacramental liturgy also combats pessimism about the world and world events By its very shape and structure sacramental liturgy is a ritual experience that reflects an optimistic approach to human life In the end all will be well In the meantime we need sacramental liturgy to put the world into focus and perspective Opportunities for experiences of hope abound in the celebration of sacraments hope in the act of liturgy and hope derived from the act of liturgy which enables us to deal with life A second important point is that the Eucharist substantiates the contemporary emphasis on the theology of creation and places it on a truly theological ground by emphasizing that God s goodness is the source of the things of this earth used in liturgy The water is a natural symbol from God s providence bread and wine result from human manufacture of what the earth has produced Third sacramental liturgy enacts our belief that we worship God by using the things of this world This means that sacramental liturgy is always both anthropological and cosmic it articulates what we believe about the human person and the cosmos Or better through sacramental liturgy human persons put their lives and the world itself into proper

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  • Library : Rejoice In the Lord Always | Catholic Culture
    imitating Gregorian chant but rather of ensuring that new compositions are imbued with the same spirit that inspired and little by little came to shape it 15 Our Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI has made known his own teaching on the importance of Gregorian chant to the sacred liturgy W hile respecting various styles and different and highly praiseworthy traditions I desire in accordance with the request advanced by the Synod Fathers that Gregorian chant be suitably esteemed and employed as the chant proper to the Roman liturgy 16 The U S Bishops document on sacred music Sing to the Lord also reminded the Church in the United States of the importance and pride of place enjoyed by Gregorian chant Some practical suggestions are given in that document for the implementation of this principle 17 Given all of this strong teaching from the Popes the Second Vatican Council and the U S Bishops how is it that this ideal concerning Gregorian chant has not been realized in the Church Far from enjoying a pride of place in the Church s sacred liturgy one rarely if ever hears Gregorian chant This is a situation which must be rectified It will require great effort and serious catechesis for the clergy and faithful but Gregorian chant must be introduced more widely as a normal part of the Mass Some practical steps toward this are outlined in the Directive section of this pastoral letter b Other Sacred Music of the Church As regards the sacred music which is appropriate for liturgical worship next in importance to Gregorian chant is the vast repertoire of sacred polyphony old and new Eastern and Western In the words of Vatican II O ther kinds of sacred music especially polyphony are by no means excluded from liturgical celebrations so long as they accord with the spirit of the liturgical action 18 emphasis added The treasure of sacred music is to be preserved and fostered with great care Choirs must be diligently promoted 19 Sacred polyphony is composed in a particular musical form and is most often associated with the Renaissance and composers such as Palestrina Victoria Tallis Allegri and the like Also a part of the Church s musical treasury is the vast body of popular sacred music In the context of the sacred liturgy the term popular does not signify the so called pop culture but comes from the Latin populus people Popular sacred music includes hymnody psalmody vernacular Mass settings many of the Latin chant Mass settings and other forms of sacred music suited to the musical abilities of the people Religious singing by the people is to be intelligently fostered so that in devotions and sacred exercises as also during liturgical services the voices of the faithful may ring out according to the norms and requirements of the rubrics 20 The musical treasury of the Church includes not only sacred music indebted to European musical culture but also the sacred music native to other nations and peoples which has organically developed in the context of the Latin Rite In a community with vital social and historical ties to a specific culture it can be most fitting that the sacred music tradition of that culture be a part of its worship when under the guidance of the Church it can be organically integrated into the context of Catholic worship In certain parts of the world especially mission lands there are peoples who have their own musical traditions and these play a great part in their religious and social life For this reason due importance is to be attached to their music and a suitable place is to be given to it not only in forming their attitude toward religion but also in adapting worship to their native genius 21 It is important to note here that when we speak of the sacred music of a particular culture we are indeed speaking of music that is considered truly sacred within a culture This principle is not applicable to subcultures within a given society that have no connection with a religious or spiritual culture c Secular Music The Church recognizes an objective difference between sacred music and secular music Despite the Church s norms the idea persists among some that the lyrics alone determine whether a song is sacred or secular while the music is exempt from any liturgical criteria and may be of any style This erroneous idea which was alluded to earlier is not supported by the Church s norms either before or since the Second Vatican Council This does not mean that more modern compositions are not to be admitted into the Mass However such compositions must meet the essential and objective criteria for what constitutes sacred music Following are some useful citations illustrating this point First from before the Second Vatican Council It cannot be said that modern music and singing should be entirely excluded from Catholic worship For if they are not profane nor unbecoming to the sacredness of the place and function and do not spring from a desire of achieving extraordinary and unusual effects then our churches must admit them since they can contribute in no small way to the splendor of the sacred ceremonies can lift the mind to higher things and foster true devotion of soul 22 An exhortation from the Council itself Let composers produce compositions which have the qualities proper to genuine sacred music 23 From Blessed John Paul II Today the meaning of the category ʻsacred musicʼ has been broadened to include repertoires that cannot be part of the celebration without violating the spirit and norms of the Liturgy itself Not all the expressions of music are able to express adequately the mystery grasped in the fullness of the Church s faith Consequently not all forms of music can be considered suitable for liturgical celebrations 24 From our Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI As far as the liturgy is concerned we cannot say that one song is as good as another Generic improvisation or the introduction of musical genres which fail to respect the meaning of the liturgy should be avoided As an element of the liturgy song should be well integrated into the overall celebration Consequently everything texts music execution ought to correspond to the meaning of the mystery being celebrated the structure of the rite and the liturgical seasons 25 These reflections on the nature purpose qualities and treasury of sacred music in the Churchʼs liturgy present serious challenges in our own day as we seek to renew the Mass in a way that respects fosters and promotes the true nature of the Mass itself It will not be easy and will take time and patience But it must be done if we are to achieve a genuine ars celebrandi in the Mass The practical Directives regarding sacred music in this pastoral letter will help move us in the right direction LITURGICAL DIRECTIVES FOR THE DIOCESE OF MARQUETTE The following directives are intended to guide the development of a deeper understanding of the place of sacred music with the liturgy of the Mass and to implement the fundamental principles outlined in this pastoral letter They are to be integrated into the life of the parishes missions and schools of the Diocese of Marquette They are also applicable to all weddings and funerals in the Diocese even if celebrated outside of Mass Although the implementation of these directives may take some time and catechesis these directives are to be considered normative within the Diocese of Marquette under the authority of the diocesan Bishop to whom is entrusted the responsibility to moderate promote and guard the entire liturgical life of the diocesan Church 26 1 General Standards a Participatio actuosa active participation Those responsible for sacred music in the Mass must foster and enable the participatio actuosa active participation of all the faithful all should have the opportunity to participate fully and consciously in the sacred action of the Mass This does not mean that everyone present has to sing everything all the time the sacred music of the Mass pertains to different participants in different ways depending on its structure and its position in the rite The congregation should be encouraged and enabled to sing whenever appropriate and when the singing is properly rendered by the cantor or choir alone participate interiorly through engaged and prayerful silent reflection Likewise the musicians should be attentive and prayerfully engaged in the parts of the Mass which do not necessarily involve music both for their own spiritual good and so as not to become a distraction to others They should participate in the Mass observing all of the appropriate postures and gestures of the congregation to the fullest degree possible b Formation and compensation Pastors should see that musicians and those who direct them have opportunities for continuing education and authentic liturgical formation through agencies and events approved by the Bishop In accord with the Churchʼs teaching on economic justice pastors are to ensure that those who direct sacred music in the parish receive just compensation for their time and skills commensurate with their experience and level of training c Practice and liturgical discipline As Pope Benedict XVI has stated Nothing can be too beautiful for God Musicians should take these words to heart because it is they who bear much of the responsibility for bringing beauty to our liturgical celebrations Pastors should encourage musicians to aspire to the highest levels of beauty in sacred music and to embrace with joy the work which this entails We should always aim high to offer God the best and the most beautiful music of which we are capable Whether paid or volunteer those responsible for sacred music in the Mass every week should be committed to prior practice and rehearsal Every hour of worship should represent at least two hours of structured preparation at a time and place apart from the congregation d Knowledge of the documents Every pastor and music director has a serious responsibility to read and become familiar with the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council and the Church s teaching documents on the liturgy and sacred music Musical decisions in the Mass should always be informed by knowledge of the principles and norms contained in these documents These documents are listed in the Appendix and are easily accessible on the Internet e Preparation not planning It is important to keep in mind that we do not plan the Mass the Church has already provided us with a plan We prepare to celebrate the Mass This is a subtle yet important distinction The plan is found in the liturgical calendar and the official liturgical books the Ordo the Missal the Lectionary and the Graduale Our celebrations should carry out the Church s plan as far as we are able according to the resources and talents of the community formed by knowledge of the norms and the Catholic worship tradition f What should we sing at Mass 1 The liturgical books the Missal Graduale and Lectionary envision that as a rule we sing the Mass at Mass rather than sing songs during Mass To truly sing the Mass as described below is the ideal and should be an overall priority for parish worship 2 The sung parts of the Mass consist of the Ordinary the Propers the Orations and the Dialogues The Ordinary consists of the Mass parts which are the same every Sunday Kyrie Gloria Sanctus and Agnus Dei At times it is also appropriate to sing the Credo Ordinarily these pertain to the congregation although on occasion a skilled choir is permitted to sing a more challenging setting alone They may be sung in Latin or the vernacular in Gregorian settings or in other forms of sacred music The Propers are the parts which vary according to the calendar Entrance Chant Responsorial Psalm Alleluia with its verse Offertory Chant and Communion Chant Entrance Chant Offertory Chant and Communion Chant As the name implies these are the chants sung at the Entrance preparation of the Gifts and Communion respectively These are found in the Graduale Romanum the Missal and the Graduale Simplex and are intended to be sung in Latin or the vernacular Using the texts and musical settings for these chants is the first and preferred option 27 It is worth noting that many of the texts for these chants as they are found in the Roman Missal are new and musical settings for them in Latin and English are currently being composed by Church musicians Responsorial Psalm and the Alleluia with its verse These are the chants between the readings The Responsorial Psalm with its response is normally taken from the Lectionary as assigned for that day A seasonal Psalm with its response selected from the Lectionary may also be sung A selection from the Graduale Romanum or the Graduale Simplex may also be used 28 The Alleluia verse is normally taken from the Lectionary itself or the Graduale During Lent the Alleluia is replaced by the Verse before the Gospel 29 The Orations and Dialogues are the texts of the Collects and other prayers and those in which the celebrant and people address each other for example the greeting and its response The Lord be with you And with your spirit Musical notations for these dialogues are provided in the Missal and should be used g What about hymns 1 Hymns are a musical form pertaining more properly to the Liturgy of the Hours rather than the Mass Hymn singing at Mass originated in the custom of the people singing vernacular devotional hymns at Low Mass during the celebrantʼs silent recitation of the Latin prayers However the current Missal as well as official liturgical documents envision a singing of the Mass as outlined above 2 The Roman Missal assigns a few hymns to various Masses in the course of the liturgical calendar for example the Sequences for Easter and Pentecost and the Ubi caritas and Pange lingua on Holy Thursday However the hymns and songs commonly sung at Mass every week at the Entrance Preparation of the Gifts and Communion are not identified in the Missal It is important to recognize that when we sing hymns at these moments during Mass it is because we are omitting some of the Mass chants the Propers as discussed above 3 Singing hymns in place of the Proper chants is permissible for pastoral reasons The liturgical norms put the highest priority on singing the rite itself We may never substitute other texts for the Ordinary parts of the Mass as described above However if it is not possible or practical to sing the Proper parts we are referred to a secondary option substituting music from a source other than the Missal such as hymns from a hymnal 30 These cannot be just any songs they should be liturgical based on liturgical texts or at least in some other way closely tied in with the Mass or the season They must also meet the requirements for what constitutes sacred music Note that this substitution of hymns for the Propers applies only to the Entrance Chant the Offertory Chant and the Communion Chant and never to the Responsorial Psalm or the Gospel verse 2 Specific Musical Standards for Parish Masses a Singing the Mass 1 One parish celebration every Sunday should be a Sung Mass Missa cantata offered with consistency and with the greatest care and attention the community can give it In the former traditional parlance this may have been referred to as a High Mass It could also be referred to as a Solemn Mass A Sung Mass need not be elaborate indeed the principle of noble simplicity should guide it Other Masses in the parish may include less singing and more recited parts but the Sung Mass sets the pattern and the model for sacred music in the parish 2 The current Missal sometimes makes reference to the principal Mass of a parish This may be the appropriate choice for the celebration of the Sung Mass Parishes whose only Mass of precept is on Saturday may make this a Sung Mass Pastors who have the care of more than one parish may rotate the Sung Mass among them weekly or seasonally according to local circumstances 3 The Church s liturgy admits of the principle of degrees or progression of solemnity according to the liturgical calendar and the capabilities of the ministers of the Mass and the congregation Singing plays a significant role in the application of this principle In other words on more solemn occasions more of the Mass would be sung by the ministers and congregation and more elaborate music might be used Also the specific capabilities of a congregation and the ministers of the Mass might dictate which parts are sung and whether simpler forms of sacred music would best fit the situation These principles are explained in the Instruction on Music in the Liturgy Musicam Sacram following the Second Vatican Council Particularly helpful in this regard are the progressive degrees of singing that should be employed in the celebration of Mass which are described there 31 A very practical example of what is being said here would be the expectation that a daily ferial Mass with a small congregation and no musicians would employ much less singing than the Mass at Midnight for Christmas with full choir and organist Then there are gradations of solemnity and singing in between 4 It must also be recognized that some parishes and missions simply do not have the same pool of trained and qualified musicians as others This does not mean that they should not also benefit from a prayerful and sung celebration of the Mass It might mean that simpler forms of sacred music such as simple sacred plainchant and hymnody would best fit the occasion and the local situation In small

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  • Library : Sing to the Lord, All the Earth! | Catholic Culture
    beautiful musical expression that we can offer him as we sing the Mass My illustrious predecessor the Most Reverend Alexander K Sample wrote eloquently regarding Sacred Music in his pastoral letter entitled Rejoice in the Lord Always The teaching and directives given therein remain in effect although he acknowledged that the implementation of the directives would take some time and catechesis Therefore to build upon the foundation laid by my predecessor I hereby issue this Instruction on Sacred Music in Divine Worship to elucidate the steps to be taken to promote Sacred Music in the Diocese of Marquette over the next five years The following easy steps can be taken by the smallest parishes in the diocese Thus all parishes and schools are to have implemented the following directives by December 31 2020 1 All parishes and schools will learn to chant the Ordinary parts of the Mass in English that are found in the Roman Missal and they will be sung by the congregation some of the time throughout the year 2 All parishes and schools will learn to chant the Kyrie Sanctus and Agnus Dei from the Missa lubilate Deo and they will be sung by the congregation some of the time throughout the year 3 All parishes and schools will learn to chant the Communion Antiphon in English to a very simple tone that everyone can sing and the Communion Antiphon will be sung at every Sunday Mass A hymn may be sung after the Communion Antiphon while the congregation is receiving the Blessed Sacrament 4 A Diocesan Hymnal will be used to ensure the musical quality and doctrinal integrity of the Sacred Music The hymnal will include a broad repertoire of hymns from classical to contemporary a It is projected that the hymnal may be ready to implement on the first Sunday of Advent 2017 Once the diocesan hymnal is implemented no other hymnal may be used b Effective immediately no other hymnal may be purchased c To assist with the cost the diocese will purchase the hymnals and the parishes will reimburse the diocese for the cost over a period of three years Over time this will amount to a significant cost savings to the parishes in comparison to the annual disposable music resources d It is acknowledged that some parishes have recently purchased hymnals In these cases a singular provision will be made for each parish To assist with the planning and implementation of the diocesan hymnal the pastors of these parishes are to request this special provision from the Diocesan Bishop in writing no later than April 30 2016 In making the request please indicate the hymnal that was purchased the purchase date the total number of hymnals purchased the cost and any other relevant information such as whether the hymnals were donated etc e Parishes may recommend hymns to be included in the diocesan hymnal with the understanding that not all recommendations might be accommodated due to space limitations or to ensure

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