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  • www.cdhm.org August 2009 CDHM Member Articles
    ways of making these You can Google origami boxes or folding paper boxes and find directions on how to make them I ve also used some wonderful pieces of wrapping paper to make larger boxes Just be sure that the inks do not run should your box become damp or wet Now we should talk about packing material for your little box I like using poly fiber fill or batting It s the white stuffing material that is used to stuff your dolls stuffed animal and in quilting projects I buy mine at the fabric stores and it is also available at most department stores Just a little bit of this white fiber will protect your mini during the bumpy trip to its new home White tissue paper works well too Once your little one is snug and packed in its box you will need to secure it from opening I like to use small left over pieces of yarn scraps of ribbon or even colorful string If you look around you will come up with other materials that will work for you It is always a good idea to mark your box with your information I like using my

    Original URL path: http://www.cdhm.org/news/member-articles0809.php (2016-04-27)
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  • www.cdhm.org July 2009 CDHM Member Articles
    boards e mailing other miniaturists and chatting with miniature food makers at shows another interesting thing happened Although I worked in semi isolation in a small town in Pennsylvania there were lots of other people out there using the exact same techniques I thought I had discovered alone in my kitchen watching the 11 00 p m news Who d have thought Even while sitting in my kitchen late at night never having met another miniaturist and working while watching TV re runs I was living up to the saying there are no new ideas For those of us who are new to miniature food it is interesting to know that they were making miniature food canes in the early 1980s Before that miniature food was made from plaster paper mache plastic wood and metal I don t know who the first person was to make a miniature roasted chicken but I can assure you with confidence that it wasn t Angie Scarr and it most certainly wasn t me If you work hard you will eventually develop your own style It is a given If you haven t yet then you just have to practice more I can identify the work of many food artists just by their individual styles They ve grown from copying the teacher to developing their own techniques and applying their own creativity To get your work to stand out think about what you love shabby yet chic turn of the century France country farm house Tudor diners or shops then do your research Learn all that you can about it Then think about what collectors might want Look at the CDHM Galleries Ebay and Etsy to see what is selling now Go to the library and look at all of the style magazines that you can get your hands on these are filled with beautiful arrangements of everything from food to fabrics Start a file of photos that you like and refer to them when you are in a creative slump And all that hard work can pay for your clay habit when you sell your original creations This is where your own creativity is so important and where the evil word copying can get everybody upset Original works are those that do not mimic the specifics of other people s work Here s an example Artist A is known for making food work boards feel free to substitute any other mini art here and has a special way of arranging the dishes on the board uses specific fabric and other components The boards are offered for sale and pictures are posted on a few websites Artist B sees them likes them a lot and decides to make a similar work board except with the exact same dishes food fabric and arrangement style The result is close enough to cause some people to say gee that looks a lot like Artist A s work If Artist B keeps that piece for display in his

    Original URL path: http://www.cdhm.org/news/member-articles0709.php (2016-04-27)
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  • www.cdhm.org June 2009 CDHM Member Articles
    four of them and it led me out of the box and into creative hoarding The first ornately Victorian bathroom I made for that first house used packaging scraps and broken bits of cufflinks jewelry beads vinyl self sticking shelf covering in a wood grain an old roll on deodorant bottle and a single serving syrup packet Try saying that three times fast My grandchild s reaction was as satisfactory as a grandma s heart could wish From there I went on to refinishing cheap dollar store furniture thanks Andrea Barham for getting me started there to kits for furniture Then I experimented with my husband s old wide polyester neckties and found that they provide enough fabric to upholster a Victorian parlor suite Then I discovered that ornate embroidered ribbon if wide enough would cover a House of Miniatures side chair seat and if all else failed mini embroidery or bargello worked a charm This was about the time I discovered that no one made basswood furniture kits in the US any longer I had begun to subscribe to a few miniature magazines and began trying their projects My first such effort was a mini working futon I had no supplies of basswood nor back then the tools to work with it What I did have was a Dremel rotary tool I was still learning about the Dremel and used a package of craft sticks and a bottle of all purpose glue to experiment A trip to the hardware store taught me there were 4mm hardware bits and my first futon that I made provided a very nice loveseat wide single bed Since then I have acquired a few more tools and I ve learned where to purchase basswood I ve also taught myself to make a few other

    Original URL path: http://www.cdhm.org/news/member-articles0609.php (2016-04-27)
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  • www.cdhm.org May 2009 CDHM Member Articles
    have a chat with the various members about the different houses they had made and even go visit a few to see for themselves Let me say that the weekend turned into a miniature marathon Peter and Miriam duly arrived in their camper on Friday at about mid day for a preliminary chat about things miniature before the upcoming meeting At the actual meeting on Saturday club members were completing a picnic hamper they had started the previous month Peter and Miriam decided that they would like to make one too so we started them off and they did really well They planned to go on down the coast on Sunday morning to visit some relatives friends Hah So much for that plan On Monday they were still here pouring over magazines and books and discussing the pros and cons of different tools They eventually left at lunch time on Monday to go back home and got 45kms down the road where they stopped at the local council dump and bought some old timber Venetian blinds to scavenge the slats for the making of miniatures and then to a tool shop where they purchased a motor tool and other various

    Original URL path: http://www.cdhm.org/news/member-articles0509.php (2016-04-27)
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  • www.cdhm.org April 2009 CDHM Member Articles
    in the 17th century were not merely toys but educational resources as they provided young girls with visual aids when learning how to run a domestic house The collection also includes houses from the 18th 19th and 20th century right through to the present day A rather colourful creation The Kaleidoscope House was designed in 2002 by Peter Wheelwright an American architect and Laurie Simmons an artist and photographer It has been made out of coloured translucent Perspex leading to a creative educational and fun design appealing to the children of our modern world This is one of my favourites and probably one of the houses that inspired me it is simply known as the Amy Miles House after the little girl who owned it It was made in 1890 and houses miniature examples of innovative domestic technology of the time including a telephone a water geyser for heating the water in the bathroom and a carpet sweeper Originally it was loaned to the museum in 1915 and eventually given in 1925 Unfortunately this picture does not show its full grandeur Hopefully I have wetted your appetite with this delicious little glimpse into what the V A Museum of Childhood

    Original URL path: http://www.cdhm.org/news/member-articles0409.php (2016-04-27)
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  • CDHM: Terms of Service
    be deemed to be included in the Monthly Service Fees or limited by any provision in this Agreement and may be passed on to Customer at any time when such costs are incurred by assessed or required of CDHM org CDHM org may increase the Monthly Service Fees from time to time upon thirty 30 days prior written notice to Customer Provision of Service CDHM org may in its sole discretion from time to time rearrange delete add or otherwise change packaging and Services contained in CDHM org s basic structure or other Services provided pursuant to this Agreement Customer acknowledges that CDHM org has the right at any time to upgrade change or enhance the website without notice and to substitute software that CDHM org deems to be comparable Restrictions Customer shall not and shall not authorize or permit any person or persons to i copy record dub duplicate alter make or manufacture any software or other products of the Services or any part thereof ii transmit the Services or any part thereof by any computer or electronic transmission or by any other means or use the Services or any part thereof outside the Service Location Customer acknowledges that such duplication reproduction or transmission may subject Customer to criminal penalties and or civil liability and damages under applicable copyright and or trademark laws Customer shall not and shall not authorize or permit any other person to i charge a cover charge or admission fee to any Service Location s at the time the Services or any part thereof are being performed or are to be performed If Customer fails to abide by these restrictions Customer accepts liability for any and all claims made against Customer or CDHM org due to any unauthorized commercial exhibition and Customer agrees to indemnify and hold CDHM org harmless from any damages loss cost liability or expense including reasonable attorneys fees arising from a breach of these restrictions LIMITATION OF LIABILITY Limited Warranty At all times during the Service Period CDHM org warrants that it will use commercially reasonable efforts in keeping with industry standards to cause the Services to be available to the Customer Damage Loss or Destruction of Software Files and or Data Customer agrees that Customer uses the Services supplied by CDHM org at its sole risk CDHM org does not manufacture the Equipment and the Equipment is provided by CDHM org in good faith on an as is basis without warranties of any kind CDHM org assumes no responsibility whatsoever for any damage to or loss or destruction of any of Customer s hardware software files data or peripherals which may result from Customer s use of any Service or from the installation maintenance or removal of any Service Network or related Equipment or software CDHM org does not warrant that data or files sent by or to Customer will be transmitted in uncorrupted form or within a reasonable period of time Force Majeure Event Customer agrees that CDHM org

    Original URL path: http://www.cdhm.org/termsofservice.php (2016-04-27)
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