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  • House Hearing Explores Protecting Speech While Preventing Violent Extremism | Charity & Security Network
    homegrown extremists is gaining more public attention the answer to that question is difficult as experts say the process that pushes people to engage in terrorist acts remains inexact Research suggests that no single pathway towards terrorism exists making it somewhat difficult to identify overarching patterns in how and why individuals are susceptible to terrorist recruitment as well as intervention strategies Kim Cragin a terrorism expert at Rand Corp said at the hearing Another speaker called for the focus of investigation to focus actual steps people take toward violence rather than the ideology or beliefs that a person may have Dr Stevan Weine a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago said It s not what people say or think but whether they commit violent acts that counts Terrorist researchers argue that our central concern should be on preventing violent radicalization and not radicalization per se Weine who is studying violent radicalization in Minneapolis s Somali community said research in this area does not support the claim that there is a particular profile of terrorists that clearly distinguishes them from the general population other than their involvement in violent radicalization In addition to raising similar concerns about the difficulty in identifying factors that lead to violent radicalization Michael Macleod Ball acting director of the ACLU Washington Legislative Office called for the protection of free speech while understanding the violent radicalization process It is crucial to understand the importance of zealously safeguarding our constitutionally protected freedoms while we strive to understand how individuals become violent extremists he said While we recognize that our government has an obligation to protect us from terrorism Congress must tread carefully when attempting to examine people s thoughts or classify their beliefs as inside or outside the mainstream We must avoid infringing on fundamental rights

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/news/house_hearing_radicalization_speech_Dec_09 (2016-02-16)
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  • Principles of International Charity
    have successfully addressed these challenges through attention to procedures designed to reduce the risk that charitable assets would be used for noncharitable purposes Some of these procedures are mandated by the U S tax law and others are determined by individual organizations assessments of the demands of their charitable activities The Fundamental Principles listed below are followed by ten pages of commentary that further guides international charitable operations The principles are 1 Consistent with the privilege inherent in their tax exempt status charitable organizations must exclusively pursue the charitable purposes for which they were organized and chartered 2 Charitable organizations must comply with both U S laws applicable to charities and the relevant laws of the foreign jurisdictions in which they engage in charitable work Charitable organizations however are nongovernmental entities that are not agents for enforcement of U S or foreign laws or the policies reflected in them 3 Charitable organizations may choose to adopt practices in addition to those required by law that in their judgment provide additional confidence that all assets whether resources or services are used exclusively for charitable purposes 4 The responsibility for observance of relevant laws and adoption and implementation of practices consistent with the principles contained herein ultimately lies with the governing board of each individual charitable organization The board of directors of each charitable organization must oversee implementation of the governance practices to be followed by the organization 5 Fiscal responsibility is fundamental to international charitable work Therefore an organization s commitment to the charitable use of its assets must be reflected at every level of the organization 6 When supplying charitable resources fiscal responsibility on the part of the provider generally involves a in advance of payment determining that the potential recipient of monetary or in kind contributions has the ability

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/print/138 (2016-02-16)
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  • US, EU Grantmaker Groups Publish Accountability Principles for International Philanthropy
    of a two year consultative process of grantmakers and stakeholders from four continents The COF press release 3 announcing the document says Voluntary and aspirational the Principles and accompanying Practices aim to guide and support funders in making better decisions in pursuing their international missions and objectives and to provide a framework that will encourage and assist more foundations to get involved internationally The document encompasses seven concise Principles based on an identified set of core values that foundations should aspire to embrace They address integrity understanding respect responsiveness fairness cooperation and collaboration and effectiveness They seek to fill a specific niche and complement activities undertaken in Europe and the United States that deal with broader issues of accountability effectiveness and good practice The Principles are a living document that will be reviewed and updated periodically While the document does not specifically address ways to protect against diversion of charitable resources to terrorists it is similar the Principles of International Charity 4 published by a group of U S nonrprofits in March 2005 as an alternative to the problematic Treasury Department Guidelines 5 Source URL http www charityandsecurity org solutions EU US Grantmaker Accountability Principles Links 1 http www charityandsecurity

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/print/112 (2016-02-16)
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  • UPDATED: Compliance Toolkit Aims to Inform and Protect UK Charities
    in their activities emphasis added The first chapter Charities and Terrorism outlines how charities and their work are affected by key aspects of the UK s counter terrorism legislation and helps charities work to manage their own risk measures and procedures Chapter 1 Charities and Terrorism Summary 4 What this guidance is about and how to use it 5 Background information on the Commission s and UK Government s counter terrorism strategies 6 How might a charity be abused for terrorist purposes 7 Counter terrorism legislation an overview 8 Proscribed organisations 9 Designated individuals and entities 10 Terrorist financing 11 Charity law duties and responsibilities 12 Reporting requirements 13 The international dimension 14 Further information 15 Chapter 2 Safeguarding Charity Funds modules are Storing and moving funds the formal banking system other money transfer systems Money service bureaux Hawala cash new technologies e money SMS money transfers The Know Your principles trustees responsibilities for due diligence with donors partners beneficiaries monitoring verification and reporting on end use of funds Raising funds and Fraud and financial crime including money laundering Chapter 3 Safeguarding Charities People Property Reputation modules may include Risk refresher guidance on assessing and managing risk Reputational risk association with terrorism Disputes Vulnerable beneficiaries especially safeguarding children Owning property overseas and Risk assessment tools and methodologies examples of sector good practice in different high risk contexts country and regional Andrew Hind Chief Executive of the Charity Commission said Charities make a vital contribution to society and building community cohesion We fully recognize the importance of enabling charities to undertake valuable and essential humanitarian and other work in the UK and overseas This guidance is designed to help them do just that whilst managing the risk of harm or abuse More information about the compliance toolkit will be provided by

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/print/388 (2016-02-16)
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  • Examples of Charitable Sector Standards
    A project of the Collaborative for Development Action Inc and CDA Collaborative Learning Projects November 2004 Principles of International Charity 6 published by the Treasury Guidelines Working Group in March 2005 InterAction s PVO Standards 7 updated January 2011 Humanitarian Accountability Partnership 8 Muslim Advocates Accreditation Program 9 Transparency International s Preventing Corruption in Humanitarian Operations Handbook of Good Practices 10 Source URL http www charityandsecurity org Examples of Charitable

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/print/352 (2016-02-16)
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  • A Comparison on Due Process Rights of Drug Kingpins and Charities Accused of Supporting Terrorism
    has not been released within 15 days of the request the claimant may file a petition in the court that issued the seizure warrant 52 53 The court must make a decision within 30 days of receiving the petition 53 54 B Charities A charity can ask the Treasury Department to remove it from the list of designated entities but it is totally within Treasury s discretion to grant or deny the request 54 55 A designated charitable group cannot present its own evidence in an appeal to the federal courts 55 56 On appeal the courts are limited to deciding whether a group s designation as a supporter of terrorism was reasonable 56 57 On matters relating to national security courts have deferred back to Treasury 57 58 VII Conclusion While far from perfect CAFRA is an example of what future adjustments to U S law governing charities and counterterrorism should do At a minimum the government must create an independent venue where a charitable group can contest their designation as an SDTG The requirement for a special license for potential legal representation should be removed Otherwise without some sort of well defined forfeiture procedure more donated money will not reach the people who need it most 1 59 E L Gaston Taking the Gloves Off of Homeland Security Rethinking the Federalism Framework for Responding to Domestic Emergencies 1 Harv L Pol y Rev 519 521 2007 2 60 International Emergency Economic Powers Act 50 U S C 1701 1 2 3 61 OMB Watch Authority and Process of Office of Foreign Assets Control to Release Frozen Charitable Funds 2006 http www ombwatch org article articleview 3632 1 407 TopicID 2 62 4 63 OMB Watch supra note 3 5 64 Press Release Dep t of Treasury Contributions by the Dep t of the Treasury to the Fin War on Terror Fact Sheet Sept 2002 http www treas gov press releases reports 2002910184556291211 pdf 65 6 66 International Emergency Economic Powers Act 50 USC 1701 7 67 Exec Order No 13 224 66 Fed Reg 186 Sept 25 2001 8 68 Nicole Nice Petersen Justice for the Designated The Due Process that is Due to Alleged U S Financiers of Terrorism 93 Geo L J 1387 1388 2005 9 69 Nina J Crimm High Alert The Government s War on the Financing of Terrorism and its Implication for Donors Domestic Charitable Organizations and Global Philanthropy 45 Wm Mary L Rev 1341 1392 2004 10 70 See generally Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 18 U S C 983 2000 11 71 See generally Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act 18 U S C 1962 2006 12 72 Chrystal Mancuso Smith From Monkey Wrenching to Mass Destruction Eco Sabotage and the American West 26 J Land Resources Envtl L 319 331 2006 13 73 Mancuso Smith supra note 13 at 331 14 74 Lisa H Nicholson The Culture of Under Enforcement Buried Treasure Sarbanes Oxley and the Corporate Pirate 5 DePaul Bus Com L J 321 349 2007 15 75 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 18 U S C 983 2000 16 76 Avital Blanchard The Next Step in Interpreting Criminal Forfeiture 28 Cardozo L Rev 1415 1442 2006 17 77 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 18 U S C 985 2000 18 78 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 18 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 28 U S C 2465 2000 19 79 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 19 20 80 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 18 U S C 983 2000 21 81 Id 22 82 International Emergency Economic Powers Act 50 U S C 1701 23 83 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at b 24 84 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 18 U S C 983 2000 25 85 Id 26 86 Amer Airways Charters Inc v Regan 746 F 2d 865 866 67 D C Cir 1984 27 87 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at c 28 88 Id 29 89 Id 30 90 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at d 31 91 Id 32 92 Id 33 93 Exec Order No 13 224 supra note 8 34 94 Id 35 95 Id 36 96 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 19 at a 37 97 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 19 at b 38 98 Id 39 99 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at a 40 100 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at f 41 101 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 19 at a 42 102 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at f 43 103 Benevolence Int l Found Inc v Ashcroft 200 F Supp 2d 935 N D Ill 2002 44 104 Id 45 105 Holy Land Found for Relief Dev v Ashcroft 219 F Supp 2d 57 D C Cir 2002 Kind Hearts v Comm r of Econ Sec No C4 02 110 Minn Ct App July 02 2002 46 106 Holy Land Found for Relief Dev 219 F Supp 2d at 76 47 107 OMB Watch Letter from Betsy Buchalter Adler et al to Henry Paulson U S Secretary of Treasury Nov 6 2006 available at http www ombwatch org npadv Paulson letter pdf 108 48 109 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at d 49 110 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at a 50 111 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at a 51 112 Id 52 113 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at f 53 114 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 supra note 10 at a 54 115 International Emergency Economic

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/print/140 (2016-02-16)
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  • Send by email | Charity & Security Network
    case sensitive Switch to audio verification Home page Issues Humanitarian Access Material Support Financial Action Task Force FATF Financial Access Peacebuilding Countering Violent Extremism Click Here For More Issues Solutions Principles to Guide Solutions Models to Draw On Proposed Solutions News The latest headlines Resources Litigation Analysis Background Legislation Studies Reports Experts Blog About Us Staff Contact Search form Search Stay Up To Date Subscribe Publications The Latest News C

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/printmail/140 (2016-02-16)
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  • Accreditation Program for U.S. Muslim Charities Reduces Fear of Giving
    key part of this is transparency Vohra said Donors want to know the same thing Where is our money going Where is it being used According to the Muslim Advocates press release MCAP provides American Muslim charities with legal guidance and one on one technical assistance to promote best practices in charity management and compliance with federal laws MCAP requires participants of the program to comply with 20 Standards for Charity Accountability 6 that require a verifiable demonstration that they meet basic standards in how they govern their organization the ways they spend their money the truthfulness of their representations and their willingness to disclose basic information to the public Muslim Advocates has also uploaded a guidance video on YouTube 7 for donors and charities The video encourages viewers to make donations to reputable U S based charities It also asks that donors to increase their own diligence to help steer their charitable donations toward their intended purposes Speaking about the accreditation program the President CEO of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance Art Taylor said As an independent evaluator of charities the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance believes that the organizations it has reviewed for the Muslim Charities Accreditation Program operate with a level of transparency and accountability that should give donors confidence in this time of giving As of September 2009 17 Islamic charities are enrolled in the program and nearly 150 groups have attended free legal and financial seminars hosted by Muslim Advocates and its partners around the country From the Muslim Advocates press release the three American Muslim organizations which have already completed 3 the program are 3 Islamic Networks Group ING Founded in 1993 San Francisco based Islamic Networks Group ING promotes cross religious and cultural understanding respect and harmony through increasing religious and cultural

    Original URL path: http://www.charityandsecurity.org/print/223 (2016-02-16)
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