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  • A Walk on Germantown Avenue
    prosperous of several great stores in Chestnut Hill These stores served an important function linking the farmers of the surrounding towns to Philadelphia s urban markets Farmers often women would bring their produce to Chestnut Hill and trade for needed household and farm items Philadelphia merchants traveled to these stores to trade for or purchase goods for their more urban customers By the early nineteenth century the network of roads

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/avenue/09/index.html (2016-04-26)
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  • A Walk on Germantown Avenue
    village of Poffabro immigrated to the US in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries many ending up in Chestnut Hill The Venetian Club was started in 1924 by a group of these immigrants from the Friuli Venezia Giulia region of northern Italy These Italian immigrants who put in long hours moving stone in the quarries and worked as skilled stonemasons building the stone houses walls and commercial buildings in

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/avenue/10/index.html (2016-04-26)
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  • A Walk on Germantown Avenue
    saw when he passed through This stone was quarried at several sites in this vicinity as early as the 1840s These quarries supplied the stone for neighborhood building projects and for projects as far away as Bryn Mawr Detroit and Los Angeles By the late nineteenth century many of the quarrymen and stone masons living and working in the neighborhood were Italians who had emigrated from northern Italy to work

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/avenue/11/index.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Robert Venturi: 20th Century Chestnut Hill
    House Venturi and Short Robert Venturi project architect designed and built 1959 62 MOTHER S HOUSE Here is a house the architectural historian Vincent Scully referred to as the biggest small building of the second half of the twentieth century As an example of Modern architecture of the 1960s it was unusual as a building whose aesthetic engaged symbolism as well as abstraction it was Modern but it also looked like a traditional house with a sloping roof traditional actual windows in its facades and explicit elements of ornament on its surfaces And then its walls were green rather than white And through the openings of its exterior walls like those of the Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier of 1928 you could see complex elements so it was simple outside and complex inside it was designed from the outside in as well as the inside out All this could add up to an architecture that is Mannerist via its complexity and contradictions an approach again unusual in the Modernist mid century So it is Modern and Mannerist It looks like a house It was designed also to contain the more or less traditional furniture of Vanna Venturi She loved it

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/20thcentury/01-venturi.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Louis Kahn: 20th Century Chestnut Hill
    Vincent Scully an early champion of Kahn s work wrote that Kahn was gifted in every imaginable way most of all as musician and painter Kahn s greatness as an architect is a measure of the richness and quality of his gifts and his experience The house he designed for Margaret Esherick niece of sculptor Wharton Esherick at 204 Sunrise Lane is one of his few residential commissions that were actually built His spirit and guiding hand touch those who live there The size of the windows and their carefully considered placement fi ll the house with light that is choreographed by the time of day and the seasons Kahn described the many considerations that went into its design Beauty and logic were two They form a house that is clean direct and warm The warmth is created in part by the richness and variety of the wood within and without in the cypress shutters the teak bookcases the oak wall in the living room and the rough oak beam supporting the balcony The setting made its own contribution to it design The house has two faces which suggest two diff erent houses The street side is private and the

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/20thcentury/02-kahn.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Kenneth Day: 20th Century Chestnut Hill
    1938 39 KENNETH MACKENZIE DAY 1901 1958 a native of Chestnut Hill designed 8220 Millman in 1938 for Charles Woodward As the most prominent example of the International Style in Chestnut Hill the house embodies many of the characteristic formal qualities of the movement including an emphasis on abstraction a rejection of applied ornamentation and decoration and a belief in the potential of machine age technology and materials The clearly expressed volumes and nely rendered openings are of brick construction painted with a white wash nish to convey a sense of abstraction A steel structure provides for expansive interior spaces which on the garden side open gracefully to the exterior The handsomely proportioned front door suggests the 2 story entry hall beyond a space dominated by a spectacular free standing circular stair The stair is supported in part by a parapet rail of birch plywood which was a novel material for the domestic market at the time The curvilinear wall adjacent to the entry originally housed a service court now enclosed and beyond a large two car garage now filled in signaled the increasing importance of the automobile in American life William Whitaker Curator Architectural Archives University of Pennsylvania INTRODUCTION

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/20thcentury/03-day.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Romaldo Giurgola: 20th Century Chestnut Hill
    Giurgola Romaldo Giurgola project architect Built 1963 ROMALDO GIURGOLA an Italian émigré to Philadelphia was profoundly a ffected by Kahn yet designed with his own singular vision He saw architecture as experienced in pieces or fragments which were part of a larger context Each building is a piece or fragment of the surroundings and not complete on its own Inside the series of rooms would have their own narrative landscape creating a series of views and situations which would then be experienced as a full composition Nonetheless Giurgola s designs emphasized function and he evaluated the success of a project by how well it promotes human accommodation This house was commissioned by the recently widowed Mrs White a writer and sculptor who wanted a small house with large sense of space Built along a gently curving drive it is a dynamic composition of three cubic spaces that pinwheel around a central two story stair hall The unusually large living room creates an open floor plan and achieves a grandeur rarely found in a one story house The architecture here most closely identi ed with the International style contrasts sharply with the low slung linearity of many other houses of the

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/20thcentury/04-giurgola.html (2016-04-26)
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  • Oskar Stonarov: 20th Century Chestnut Hill
    of increasingly open pavilions whose flat roofs fl oat above bands of clerestory windows creating a light suspended feeling The building is anchored by a central brick pavilion housing service functions and bedrooms and separates the garage on the left from the entrance on the right The north volume houses a doubleheight living room on the west with views onto the Wissahickon as well as a balcony bedroom and bathroom

    Original URL path: http://www.chhist.org/20thcentury/05-stonorov.html (2016-04-26)
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