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  • Planning for Web Projects
    navigation and develop the user interface The prototypes should incorporate enough pages to assess accurately what it s like to move from menus to content pages Second creating a prototype allows the graphic designers to develop relations between how the site looks and how the navigation interface supports the information design The key to good prototyping is flexibility early on the site prototypes should not be so complex or elaborate that the team becomes too invested in one design at the expense of exploring better alternatives Typical results or contract deliverables at the end of this stage could include Detailed site design specification Detailed description of site content Site maps thumbnails outlines table of contents Detailed technical support specification Browser technology supported Connection speed supported Web server and server resources Proposals to create programming or technology to support specific features of the site A schedule for implementing the site design and construction One or more site prototypes of multiple pages Multiple graphic design and interface design sketches or roughs First you gather your development partners analyze your needs and goals and work through the development process The second part is creating a site specification document that details what you intend

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/architecture.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    also find opportunities to cross promote your site with affiliated businesses professional organizations broadcast or print media visitor or local information agencies real estate and relocation services Internet access providers and local city or town directory sites Your organization could also feature local nonprofit charitable or school events on your Web site The cost in server space is usually trivial and highly publicized local events featuring a Web page hosted

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/marketing.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    your ISP or corporate Web site does not offer a good site traffic analysis package ask whether the Webmaster can give you access to a monthly server log of your account Basic versions of traffic analysis programs like WebTrends cost about three hundred dollars and you can run them on a personal computer if you can gain access to the raw Web server log from your ISP or corporate Webmaster Maintaining the site Don t abandon your site once the production goes live and the parties are over The aesthetic and functional aspects of a large Web site need constant attention and grooming particularly if a group of individuals shares responsibility for updating content Someone will need to be responsible for coordinating and vetting the new content stream maintaining the graphic and editorial standards and assuring that the programming and linkages of all pages remain intact and functional Links on the Web are perishable and you ll need to check periodically that links to pages outside your immediate site are still working Don t let your site go stale by starving it of resources just as you begin to develop an audience if you disappoint them by not following through it will be doubly difficult to attract them back Backups and site archives The site editor should be sure that the Web site is regularly backed up onto a secure and reliable storage medium to ensure that a catastrophic hardware failure in your Web server does not wipe out your Web site Most Web servers maintained by information technology professionals or commercial Web service providers are backed up at least once a day If you don t know what your particular backup schedule is ask your Webmaster or Web services vendor Human error is the most common reason you may

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/maintenance.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    completely on a standard office display monitor 800 x 600 pixels and so there is almost always a part of the page that the user cannot see Web pages need to give the user explicit cues to the context and organization of information because only a small portion of any site less than a page is visible at one time As the Web page designer it is up to you to provide these functional and context cues Going back and going to the previous page All hypertext systems share a common feature that has no direct precedent in print media going back through a series of links you have previously visited is not the same as paging back through the preceding pages of an ordered sequence of pages When users click on a hypertext link in a Web document they often are transported from one Web site to another perhaps even from one country to another Once made the hypertext link is bidirectional you can go back to the Web site you just left by clicking on the Back button of the viewer Having hit the Back button you can move to the new Web site again by hitting the Forward button Button bars For the information designer hypertext links are a mixed blessing The radical shifts in context that links create can easily confuse Web users who need organized cues and interface elements if they are to follow and understand hypertext links from one Web page to another This is particularly true when users need to be able to follow or at least recognize an ordered sequence of documents Notice in the diagram above that although the user has entered the second Web site at page 6 the site is an ordered sequence of pages If the standard Web

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/navigation.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    PowerPoint graphics Although there is no substitute for looking at actual Web pages ironically this reliance on data projection is a severe limitation in explaining complex Web site structures to a team No matter how good your data projector is you can show only one Web page at a time in a Web browser and no current data projector can match the resolution size or flexibility you can write on it of a large paper diagram For major planning meetings we often print at least one very large color diagram of the site organization so that everyone can see the big picture as it develops from meeting to meeting The site diagram dominates the middle of the conference table becoming a tactile malleable representation of the plan as it evolves Everyone is free to make notes on it or suggest improvements in the site structure and the revised diagram becomes the official result of the meeting Site file and directory structures Site diagrams are also useful when your project moves from planning to actual Web page production As the new site is built up in a directory on the Web server the site diagram is often the first place programmers look to gain an understanding of how the site files should be subdivided into directories folders on the server The pattern of directories and subdirectories of the site files should mirror the major content divisions and structures as shown on the site diagram As the site directories and subdirectories are organized on the server information on the exact names used for major directories and files should be added to the site diagram so that everyone on the team has a ready current reference to the naming conventions and file locations in the site Summary Most complex Web sites share aspects

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/diagrams.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    Flexible design The Web is a flexible medium designed to accommodate different types of users and a variety of display devices Unlike a printed document which is fixed in its medium the look of a Web page depends on such elements as the display size resolution and color settings the height and width of the browser window software preferences such as link and background color settings and available fonts Indeed there is no way to have complete control over the design of a Web page The best approach then is to embrace the medium and design flexible pages that are legible and accessible to all users Layout with style sheets One of the visual properties that Cascading Style Sheets are meant to describe is how elements are positioned on the page Style sheet positioning allows designers to set margins to position text and images on the page relative to one another to hide and show elements and to stack elements so they overlay one another In theory style sheet positioning should provide all the design control needed to lay out visually appealing and legible Web pages In practice however browser inconsistencies have rendered style sheet positioning useless at least for

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/layout.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    the home page of your site Web pages are often printed or saved to disk and without this information there is no easy way to determine where the document originated Think of each page in your site as a newspaper clipping and make sure that the information required to determine its provenance is included Don t impose style Don t set out to develop a style for your site and be careful about simply importing the graphic elements of another Web site or print publication to decorate your pages The graphic and editorial style of your Web site should evolve as a natural consequence of consistent and appropriate handling of your content and page layout Maximize prime real estate In page layout the top of the page is always the most dominant location but on Web pages the upper page is especially important because the top four inches of the page are all that is visible on the typical display screen Use this space efficiently and effectively Use subtle colors Subtle pastel shades of colors typically found in nature make the best choices for background or minor elements Avoid bold highly saturated primary colors except in regions of maximum emphasis

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/considerations.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Chris Tagoe's Domain Web Links
    favor the GIF format for most page design elements diagrams and images that must not dither on 8 bit display screens Designers choose the JPEG format mostly for photographs complex photographic illustrations medical images and other types of images in which the compression artifacts of the JPEG process do not severely compromise image quality Advantages of GIF files GIF is the most widely supported graphics format on the Web GIFs

    Original URL path: http://www.christagoe.org/webmaster3/formats.html (2016-04-29)
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