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  • Civil Rights Mediation Oral History Project
    CRInfo Civil Rights Resources Overview Instructions Full List of Interview Questions Answers Topic Segments Selected Questions Answers Interview Transcripts Racial Conflict Simulation Responding to Racial Conflicts For More Information Contact Heidi Burgess or Guy Burgess Conflict Information Consortium University of Colorado Campus Box 580 Boulder Colorado 80309 03580 E mail burgess colorado edu Phone 303 492 1635 Fax 303 492 2154 Web http conflict colorado edu Richard Salem Founder Ret

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/ (2016-02-13)
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  • U.S. Mediation
    racked by volatile and often violent police community conflicts They worked on dozens of Native American reservations in the fields of California during the grape boycott led by Hispanic migrant workers and they responded to Haitian Asian American and Cuban refugee crises CRS was originally staffed by a small corps of conciliators who responded to the volatile and often violent street protests and demonstrations that were prevalent in the 1960s and early 1970s The agency worked with little public visibility to reduce tensions by opening communications between disputants helping each to understand the others issues and positions and encouraging them to meet to begin working out their differences The agency also provided technical assistance to protest groups police and other public officials and helped them to draw upon the experience of other communities to mitigate racial tensions As protests moved from the streets to the table CRS conciliators found themselves spending more time facilitating negotiations In the early 1970s there were no established models of mediation for community disputes to guide CRS in its work Collective bargaining of labor contracts was the only sector in which mediation had been institutionalized CRS began providing its staff with mediation training drawing on the labor model and a community model that was being developed by labor mediators affiliated with the American Arbitration Association AAA with support from the Ford Foundation The AAA Ford project was short lived but mediation soon took its place alongside conciliation and technical assistance as a CRS response to racial conflict CRS mediators found serious and often blatant racial discrimination embedded in most of the communities to which they were called The conflicts to which they responded were manifested by high levels of polarization tension and anger Many of them appeared intractable Yet the CRS response often resulted in mediated agreements that mitigated tensions opened communications and led to substantive changes Often when CRS mediators departed from the scene they left behind local intergroup committees that were able to monitor the agreement and continue working for improved community relations and racial justice CRS personnel learned to mediate volatile community conflicts largely through trial and error Along the way they compiled a largely unrecorded body of knowledge which they at times shared and discussed informally with their colleagues Although they have built on that knowledge to develop and refine techniques and strategies that have proved consistently effective little is known about their work outside the agency Despite their achievements as pioneers in the field there is sparse documentation in the professional literature about the ways in which CRS mediators helped communities in conflict address their differences without resorting to either violence or lengthy and expensive litigation Studies of conflict management in other contexts have been voluminous There is no shortage of literature about the mediation of family school commercial small claims court neighborhood or international mediation However little is known and less has been written about the mediation activity of CRS in part because of the confidentiality clause in Title

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/us_med.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Oral History Project Description
    others who are active at CRS today They gained their experience in nine different field offices and the national headquarters in Washington D C They represent the racial and gender diversity that typifies CRS All have a vast amount of experience working with communities enmeshed in racial conflict In interviews that ranged from three to nine hours they described their thinking and the techniques and strategies they used in their efforts to bring parties to agreement in the most racially polarized community conflicts Respondents were asked to be as specific as possible in describing their case work although names and places often were omitted or fictitious names were used to protect confidentiality The edited transcripts of these interviews are posted in their entirety on this website While visitors may choose to read one or more of the interviews in full there are faster ways to find material on particular topics of interest The most efficient way probably is to look through the list of topics discussed and click on those of interest Users can also search for particular topics using the search button The Hewlett Foundation funded this pilot project to determine the feasibility and value of this technique to capture valuable data about the work of mediators The project managers hope to obtain additional support so they can interview an even broader base of CRS mediators and add the lessons that can be drawn from their experience and expertise to this data base Those interviewed in this pilot project include Angel Alderette 1970 1986 San Francisco Office Leo Cardenas 1971 1995 Denver Office Bob Ensley 1970 1988 Atlanta Office Nancy Ferrell 1985 1996 Dallas Office Silke Hansen 1972 present Boston Washington and Denver Offices Ed Howden 1967 1986 San Francisco Office Bob Hughes 1967 1974 Atlanta and Seattle Offices

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/the_project.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Funding and Acknowledgments
    in this project They generously donated their time and shared their experiences and insights so that others can benefit from their knowledge We also want to thank other CRS mediators who gave us their support even though we could not include them in the project We are of course indebted to Steve Toben former Program Officer and his colleagues at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation for their encouragement and

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/funding_and_acknowledgments.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Project Staff
    D Research Directors for this project are Co Directors of the Conflict Research Consortium at the University of Colorado They have been involved in the practice research and teaching of conflict resolution especially the management of intractable conflicts for more than 20 years Interviews were conducted by Dr Heidi Burgess Mary Trujillo a consultant in cultural conflicts and doctoral student in Communications at Northwestern University and Dana Johnson and Amanda Wember both Sociology graduate students at the University of Colorado Editing and coding were done by Dana Johnson Amanda Wember and Mike Torley an advanced undergraduate at the University of Colorado who also assisted with transcription and provided invaluable assistance to the project on many fronts Others who helped transcribe and edit include Cory China Lucy Selzer Jackie Wooten and Katie Osborn all undergraduate students at the University of Colorado Greta Salem Ph D professor emerita of political science at Alverno College Milwaukee Wisconsin served as a consultant to this project She is an officer of CMI and has written about community organization curriculum development and community perceptions of crime Consultants who assisted during the planning phase were Sydney Lewis Chicago based oral historian Jerry Barrett of Fairfax VA compiler

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/personnel.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Additional Materials
    Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Background documents provided to this project by former CRS mediator Ed Howden include Notes on Mediation Central concepts usual ground rules based on experience of the Western Regional Office Community Relations Service U S Department of Justice A Note on the Differences between Interpersonal and Large Group Interventions again these are brief but useful notes on the additional challenges posed by large intergroup conflicts Notes regarding use of mediation teams and comparing teams to individual mediation Books Levine Bertram Bridge over Troubled Waters The Federal Government s Approach to Reducing Racial Conflict 1964 1989 Forthcoming 2001 Pompa Gilbert G The Community Relations Service in Dennis Sandole and Ingrid Sandole Staroste Conflict Management and Problem Solving Interpersonal to International Applications 1987 New York New York University Press pp 130 142 Articles Greenberg Barbara Identifying and Resolving Conflict in Multicultural Settings National Association of Secondary School Principals Bulletin January 1995 Huie Barbara Cross Cultural Conflict on the Texas Gulf Coast 1987 in Forum Washington D C National Institute of Dispute Resolution Klugman Julian Negotiating Agreements and Resolving Disputes Across Cultures 1992 Mediation Quarterly 9 2 Klugman Julian and Barbara Greenberg Program Helps Identify Resolve Problems in Multicultural High Schools The National Association of Secondary School Principals Bulletin December 1991 Klugman Julian Barbara Greenberg and Stephen Thom Resolving Conflict in Racially Diverse Schools The Fourth R August September 1992 Klugman Julian Barbara Greenberg Stephen Thom and Joseph Jones Identifying and Resolving Conflicts in Multicultural Settings The National Association of Secondary School principals Bulletin January 1995 Klugman Julian and Joseph Jones Resolving Conflicts in Multicultural Settings Thrust for Educational Leadership May June 1994 Klugman Julian Stephen Thom and Larry Myers Mediation and Native American Repatriation of Human Remains Mediation Quarterly Summer 1993 Salem Richard A Community Dispute Resolution Through

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/addl_matrls.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Instructions
    of Interview Questions and Answers by Topic Click here to see the list of questions used by the interviewers Then click on a question to access a list of the answers from those mediators who responded to that question 2 Selected Core Questions and Answers Click here to see questions and answers to a limited set of core questions 3 Interview Transcripts Click here to view the list of mediators

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/instructions.shtml (2016-02-13)
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  • Civil Rights Mediation Oral History Project: Interview Segments by Topic
    you able to increase trust levels between parties How did you do this Would the parties look to you for guidance in constructing solutions or would they come up with their own solutions How would you respond when you were called upon to carry messages between the parties How is mediation different from facilitation What did you do to diminish tension between the parties What did you do when someone verbally attacked another person directly during mediation Did the situation ever become violent or potentially violent What did you do to diminish that Were you ever in personal danger How did you respond Did a party ever threaten to walk out of a mediation What did you do then Did a conflict ever escalate after CRS became involved How How did you initiate de escalation Did you ever separate people into small groups and work with them that way Did you find yourself helping the parties strengthen their own capacity to deal with conflict What techniques if any did you employ Did you provide technical assistance to the parties Can you give some examples Did you provide training for the parties What types of training Who did it Were their other types of technical assistance e g consultants referrals to other communities written materials When you gave technical assistance to one side did you inform the other side about it Did you offer it to the second side too Did you help the parties prepare for mediation or any joint meetings Did you assist groups with community organizing Did you try to influence coalition formation What did you do when you hit a brick wall in your effort to bridge differences between the parties Did you try to analyze or address power disparities between the parties How did power differentials effect the process When you perceived a significant power imbalance did you try to level the playing field How did you do this Did you ever provide assistance to one party without the knowledge of the other Did anyone ever ask you to become an advocate or to tilt the table in their favor How did you respond Did you ever try to use the power of the Justice Department to influence the situation or level the playing field How did you identify differing levels of power at the table What is your attitude toward ending community protest Did power differences ever block the process or interfere with it How would you describe your work in terms of your neutrality impartiality and objectivity in a case Did you ever have a need to strike a balance between helping the parties reach a settlement and achieving equity Did you address the issue of the fairness of the settlement Did you have a problem retaining your impartiality while trying to level the playing field prior to negotiations Did you work on cases involving hate groups such as the KKK or neo Nazi groups Were there techniques you used to help you maintain

    Original URL path: http://www.civilrightsmediation.org/topics/index.shtml (2016-02-13)
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