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  • June 2015 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    via laboratory diagnosis Lastly after reporting suspicious plants to these agencies the remains should be disposed appropriately in the garbage and never composted CNPS is taking measures to ensure that the plants you will buy at our chapter fall plant sales are as clean as possible as well as to stem the spread of this pernicious pest CNPS Chapter Council took action at the recent chapter council meeting last month As prevention and good cultural practices are central to stopping the spread of Phytophthoras an ad hoc committee is being created to develop short term actions to minimize these pathogens in California native plant nursery stock and CNPS plant sale stock The Willis Linn Jepson Chapter has agreed to facilitate this committee and volunteers from the Orange County Alta Peak San Luis Obispo South Coast Santa Clara Santa Cruz North Coast Tahoe and Milo Baker Chapters have signed on If you are interested in participating in this committee please provide your name and contact information to Steven Goetz at Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view by June 30 Styles of the New California Garden Peyton Ellas Quercus Landscape Design It used to be that a California native garden meant only a wild looking informal garden or that you could add some California native plants among your existing non native exotic plants in standard planting beds California landscaping has gone through a phase where a dry creek had to be part of a native plant garden and I still add dry creeks and similar water theme features in some of my landscape designs but it s no longer mandatory We ve seen wildflower meadows and native grass as turf substitute styles come and go The new California garden seems to be developing along the following basic styles See if any of these fit with your yard or goals Continue reading here Castles and Moats for Smart Drought Irrigation Jessica Dowell Have you tried dumping dish water on your plants just to watch the water flow away from the plant If so try using the castle and moat plant basin method Whether watering your garden by capturing water from your kitchen sink or installing drip irrigation good plant basins make a big difference Basins capture water rain or otherwise and allow it to sink in around the plant s roots It is conceptually similar to mulch basins used for Laundry to Landscape grey water systems or rain gardens With the continuing drought it makes sense to give our plants all the tools we can to make the best of the little water available Continue reading here CNPS Calscape Helps Californians Save Water and Restore Nature One Garden at a Time Californians are ripping out their thirsty lawns CNPS is launching Calscape to offer a native plant solution that not only saves water but also helps restore nature in California Calscape is based on a mapping of the natural distribution ranges of over 3000 native California plants developed in coordination with the Consortium of California Herbaria With this mapping Calscape site visitors can enter in the name of any California street address to easily see the plants that would naturally grow at that location Plant profiles include detailed descriptions hundreds of thousands of plant photographs sun water soil and site requirements gardening information and nursery availability Experts from CNPS and Jepson Herbarium are continuing to improve the Calscape plant profiles over time If you would like to contribute go to http calscape cnps org and click on the edit button on any plant profile Statewide Ditch your Lawn Workshops Save water during the drought by replacing your lawn with beautiful native plants With sponsorship from the California Department of Water Resources CNPS is partnering with organizations around the state to offer new Ditch your Lawn workshops which will teach homeowners how to kill their thirsty lawns and replace them with beautiful water saving native plant gardens Well chosen California natives can use up to 75 less water than traditional turf lawns while creating welcome natural habitats for local birds and butterflies Participants will learn step by step how to plan a new native plant garden remove existing lawn install new native plants and maintain them for years to come Workshops are coming to Sacramento Redding Chico Modesto and Encino this summer and fall Click here to learn more Upcoming CNPS Plant Science Workshops We are working on finalizing details for our 2015 Plant Science Workshops and have an exciting schedule in the works More details pricing and registration information will be posted very soon on the workshops webpage Please contact Becky Reilly Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view CNPS Events Coordinator for more information Introduction to Plant Family Identification Sagehen Field Station Truckee July 6 8 Vegetation Mapping UC Berkeley GIF Lab Aug 3 5 CEQA Impact Assessment Ventura Area Nov 4 5 Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the Horticulture Events Calendar Yerba Buena Chapter Program Natural History as Rhetoric Thursday July 2 7 30 PM Speaker Ken ichi Ueda lead developer for iNaturalist In the San Francisco Bay Area where we congratulate ourselves for our progressive politics and our long history of environmental activism we still fight heated battles over clearing stands of invasive trees and keeping dogs on leashes in sensitive bird habitat It seems we have convinced people that biodiversity matters without building the relationships to other organisms that would make their worth self evident Ken will argue that the kinds of rhetoric we employ are partly to blame and that the practice of natural history is itself a kind of rhetoric we can use to address this problem He ll discuss his efforts to do so with iNaturalist org an online social network

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201506.php (2016-04-26)
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  • May 2015 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    California North America and Mexico from Michael Kauffman Tom Parker and Michael Vasey with photographs by Jeff Bisbee includes color photographs range maps regional keys descriptions a brief history of each species and selected locations where you can find manzanitas in the field It is now available at the CNPS Store by clicking here Upcoming CNPS Plant Science Workshops We are working on finalizing details for our 2015 Plant Science Workshops and have an exciting schedule in the works More details pricing and registration information will be posted very soon on the workshops webpage Please contact Becky Reilly Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view CNPS Events Coordinator for more information Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevé El Portal Community Center Yosemite National Park June 3 5 Introduction to Plant Family Identification Sagehen Field Station Truckee July 6 8 Vegetation Mapping Sacramento Area TBD Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevé TBD Mid Late Oct CEQA Impact Assessment Ventura Area Nov 4 5 Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the Horticulture Events Calendar Bristlecone Chapter Field Trip Mule Springs Saturday June 6 8 30 AM At the base of the Inyo Mountains south east of Big Pine is a perennial spring surrounded by remarkable plant diversity We should be able to find plants like Hecastocleis shockleyi Petalonyx nitidis and Eucnide urens Some interesting fish reside there as well We will cover very little ground on foot but some uneven ground can be expected Dusty dirt road access Bring lunch and water It may get a little warm so meet at 8 30 at the Glacier View Campground entrance at the junction of 395 and 168 on the north edge of Big Pine For more information contact trip leader Steve Matson Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view 760 938 2862 Redbud Chapter Field Trip Yuba Gap Saturday June 6 10 00 AM to 1 00 PM Leader Roger McGehee This area tends to have an early bloom for its elevation It is also quite varied with rock outcroppings meadows and forests Last year at this time we found an abundance of wildflowers even though it was a drought year Hopefully it will provide a good bloom this year as well Bring snacks water sunscreen mosquito repellant and rain gear in case we get hit by a thunderstorm This trip will last about 3 hours From Auburn or Colfax take I 80 East exit Yuba Gap turn right onto Lake Valley Road drive about 100 yards and park on the dirt pull out Look for Roger s bright red Smart Car From Nevada City take Highway 20 to I 80 then head west toward Sacramento Then take the Yuba Gap exit turn left onto Lake Valley Road drive about 200 yards and park on the dirt pull out If you wish to provide or join a carpool please email Roger Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view with the town in which you live and he will share your email address with others in your area Orange County Chapter Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Santa Ana River Basin Sunday June 7 8 00 AM We will be surveying areas of the Santa Ana River watershed in a focused attempt to relocate some rare plants that were formerly recorded in this region but have not been seen in several decades Our two main target species are Eriastrum densifolium ssp sanctorum Santa Ana River woolly star U S Endangered CRPR 1B 1 Abronia villosa var aurita Yellow hairy sand verbena CRPR 1B 1 The Eriastrum has not been recorded in OC since 1929 but there are recent records from as near as Norco just ten miles upstream The Abronia occupies a similar habitat and adds a second rare species to the survey With some luck we might even uncover a population of the locally rare Eriogonum thurberi which was recorded at Horseshoe bend as recently as 1979 This is a full day in the field searching for specific taxa We will have fun and learn a great deal but there is a good to better chance that we will not find these plants Bring trail shoes hat sunscreen water camera tablet and pencil pen Field guide lunch and snacks as desired Infrequent water or restrooms Physical Difficulty Moderate to Strenuous Plant Intensity High Time All day but come for what you can If you are interested in participating please send an email to leader Ron Vanderhoff Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view so that we can plan properly Meet 8 am in the MacDonald s parking lot in the Savi Ranch Center at 22322 Old Canal Rd Yorba Linda on the N side of Hwy 91 at Yorba Linda Blvd Mount Lassen Chapter Field Trip Butterfly Valley Botanical Area Saturday June 13 8 30 AM Meet at Chico Park Ride west lot Hwys 32 99 at 8 30 or Mt Hough Ranger Station 39696 State Highway 70 Quincy CA 95971 at 10 AM See the Forest Service s page on Butterfly Valley Botanical Area here Leaders Gerry Ingco 530 893 5123 and Linnea Hanson 530 345 6229 Milo Baker Chapter Field Trip Coleman Valley Road Serpentine area and Ocean Song Grassland Sunday June 14 10 00 AM 2 00 PM We will look at this unique serpentine area along Coleman Valley Road for several unique rare plants Then we will continue into Ocean Song Farm to look at Coastal Prairie including their efforts to restore remnant prairie on the property and experimental plots for control of velvetgrass Holcus lanatus This trip is a great way to see some uncommon plants great examples of native prairie and beautiful views from Ocean Song We have provided a pdf plant list Meet at 9

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201505.php (2016-04-26)
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  • April 2015 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    Community Center Yosemite National Park June 3 5 Introduction to Plant Family Identification Sagehen Field Station Truckee July 6 8 Vegetation Mapping Sacramento Area TBD Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevé TBD Mid Late Oct CEQA Impact Assessment Ventura Area Nov 4 5 Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the Horticulture Events Calendar Napa Valley Chapter Field Trip Las Posadas State Forest Saturday May 2 9 00 AM Leaders Linda Price 707 257 7574 and Chris Lea 720 934 2694 Call leaders for current information Unless otherwise stated all Napa Chapter field trips begin with a carpool caravan leaving from the parking lot between Target and Pharmaca in BelAire Plaza off Trancas Street in Napa near Highway 29 at 9 00 AM Bring snacks lunch ample drinking water and sturdy hiking shoes Steady rain cancels Orange County Chapter Field Trip San Onofre State Beach Sunday May 3 With permission from CA State Parks and MSMC Camp Pendleton our group will explore a coastal blufftop with small vernal pools supporting one of California s rarest species Pendleton button celery Eryngium pendletonense We will have restoration ecologists on hand to discuss the pools and their restoration as well as CA State Parks biologist Lana Nguyen We will likely visit another nearby restoration site which is employing innovative approaches to remove invasive mustards and other adventitious plants and return the area to a naturally functioning ecosystem We will then likely visit the site of the March 2014 wildfire and view various wildflowers and a nice display of other fire following plants Depending upon group interests a few may want to extend the afternoon into an optional hike down to the coastal beach and adjoining canyons to see the uncommon Emory s rockdaisy Perityle emoryi and others Meeting time and location is pending Check www occnps org after 7 PM the night before for details Note this trip does require an entrance fee to San Mateo State Park Irregular water and restrooms Bring lunch and water for the optional extended trip Yerba Buena Chapter The Flora and Fauna of San Bruno Mountain Sunday May 3 2 30 PM The South San Francisco Public Library is pleased to host Dr David Nelson the Chair of the Locally Rare Plant Committee for San Bruno Mountain of the Yerba Buena chapter of the California Native Plant Society Dr Nelson is currently writing a book for the CNPS and will be presenting a discussion and slideshow on the flora and fauna of San Bruno Mountain one of California s many beautiful state parks For more information or to request sign interpretation or other accommodation please call 650 829 3860 voice at least 10 working days before the event South San Francisco Main Public Library 840 W Orange Ave South San Francisco CA Mount Lassen Chapter Field Trip Camp Creek Rd to Mayaro in North Fork Feather River Canyon Sunday May 3 9 00 AM Meet at Chico Park Ride west lot Hwys 32 99 at 9 00 Bring lunch water sun insect protection and money for ride sharing We will drive 32 miles north on Hwys 99 and 70 to the old railroad town of Pulga Then 2 miles on the Camp Creek Road high above and looking down on the Feather River Mayaro is the site of the ruins of a 1920 s resort accessed mainly by the Western Pacific Railroad Camp Creek Road is unpaved narrow rough surfaced recommended only for high clearance vehicles By ride sharing we will attempt to accommodate those who drive low centered vehicles We will make frequent stops to see Fritillaria snowdrop lupine and bush monkey flower as we cross from granite to serpentine slopes We shall lunch at a scenic waterfall The average elevation is about 2000 ft Call for alternate meeting place Leaders Gerry Ingco 530 893 5123 Wes Dempsey 530 342 2293 Marin Chapter Mt Tam Safari Saturday May 9 9 00 AM 3 00 PM Help find the plants missing from the past BioBlitz events Since 2012 the Marin Municipal Water District and the California Academy of Sciences have engaged with the public to document the plant biodiversity of Mt Tamalpais about 300 species are missing come help find them It is required to pre register at least 2 days in advance as follows email or call MMWD at 415 945 1128 More information is here Location and end time varies please register to obtain this information San Diego Chapter Old Town State Park Native Garden Work Party Saturday May 9 1 00 3 00 PM Come help other volunteers tend the Old Town Native Plant Landscape where the native shrubs actually grow too much despite being watered only twice a month We ll use the crown reduction pruning technique to lighten them up and leave them looking natural and full but not droopy The Landscape is at the corner of Taylor and Congress Streets in San Diego Park in the CalTrans lot at Juan and Taylor Streets then walk toward the trolley train depot and turn in at the welcome sign on the adobe wall under the cottonwood trees Bring pruners saws gloves sun protection and water Restrooms are nearby Shasta Chapter Mother s Day Wildflower Show Sunday May 10 10 00 AM 4 00 PM Cosponsored by the Klamath and Shasta Trinity National Forests treat mom to the 22nd Annual Mother s Day Wildflower Show Hundreds of native plants on display wildflower photo contest books posters and wildlife art on display For more information call Marla Knight at 530 841 4425 Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds 1712 Old US Hwy 99 Yreka CA San Gabriel Mountains Chapter Eaton Canyon Plant Walk Saturday May 10 9 00 AM Meet in front of Eaton Canyon Nature Center 1750 N Altadena Dr Pasadena

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201504.php (2016-04-26)
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  • March 2015 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    in the Central Valley we want to use different types of plants The kind that are in tune with our climate The kind that don t need as much added irrigation in the summer The kind that say low water on the plant tag There are lots of these species We ve really only begun to start planting them It s an exciting time to be a gardener For some of us that is using a lot of California native plants and accepting a drier look in the summer It gets easier over time like most new healthier habits For others it will mean mixing native species with plants from other parts of the world that do their best growing and blooming in high heat with only a little added water Much of my company s design work is based around this style We can still have a few plants especially food producing ones that require a lot of summer water Just as the first pioneers in our valley did Before we got so good at pumping and storing water Sometimes just because we can doesn t mean we should I am not opposed to wells and water storage reservoirs I am opposed to using the label drought tolerant when what we should be planting are species that don t require as much added water whether we are in a wet or dry year Those are the plants that are lower maintenance too Even if your tolerance for plants from drier climates is low see if you can replace a few plants this year with lower water use species Use the old water greedy plants as mulch which further reduces water needs in the garden Every little bit helps And you may be surprised Drought tolerance may start meaning Drought No problem Imagine that Peyton Ellas lives in Springville and is the owner of Quercus Landscape Design specializing in California native plant based and eco habitat gardens Read her blog and contact her at www QuercusLandscapeDesign com or at https www facebook com QuercusLandscapeServices From Parking Lot to Pollinator Garden a Wild Garden in the Heart of the City Photo by Carol Bornstein When the 100 year old Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County took on the huge project to shore up their physical infrastructure a side benefit was created for the museum visitors and for lovers of native plants Carol Bornstein Director of Nature Gardens recently presented the fruits of their labors a fresh and exciting take on how to integrate science beauty and social benefit A NEW VISION The new garden and landscaping around the freshly renovated museum exhibits thoughtful leadership and Carol s deep understanding and expertise The complex process that went into creating the gardens is extensive challenging and makes for a successful long term use of assets The museum is really several properties tied together by mission and cultural history The La Brea Tar Pits the Page Museum beloved by many for its collection of old bones and the Natural History Museum in Exposition Park are the main venues This three and a half acre project surrounds the Exposition Park property It took a combination of the Museum s exhibits staff their excellent researchers and outreach personnel to provide the input to the open minded and supportive architectural firm Mia Lehrer Associates Karen Wise Vice President of Education and Exhibits was quoted in a recent Pacific Horticulture article as saying Between our new Nature Gardens and the resources of the Nature Lab Angelenos can connect the ongoing work of our scientists with the diverse urban wildlife of greater Los Angeles in ways that are directly relevant to all of our daily lives Now more than one million visitors can start to experience the natural history as they approach the buildings seeing nature in action and playing in the highly interactive space Photo by Carol Bornstein ALWAYS SOMETHING HAPPENING For example this month in the Nature Gardens visitors can see wildflowers and their flying friends in profusion as native species bloom and attract a complex variety of wildlife in downtown Los Angeles The birds bees butterflies and other insects search for sustenance and in doing so transfer pollen from blossom to bloom The museum encourages people of all ages to visit the all new Pollinator Garden opening March 20 to see for themselves THOUGHT PROCESS FOR DESIGN Carol told us that the questions they asked at the beginning of the process drove the creativity and the specialized aspects of the garden They started with provocative questions rarely asked of a public space landscaping project What are pollinators Why should we care Why are they in peril What can we do EXHIBIT GOALS Once these questions and others had been explored the functionality was considered The space must Deliver educational content Showcase native plants that attract support pollinators Create habitat for diverse array of pollinators Demonstrate physical links between plants and their pollinators Provide naturalistic contrast to formal pollinator garden DESIGN CHOICES The museum was looking for a naturalistic composition to contrast with the more formal gardens that surround this large parcel in the midst of densely developed rigidly gridded central Los Angeles Curved edges with narrow paths give the space an openness and informality that The space is meant to appeal to multiple senses with a mix of life forms for habitat value and visual interest The berms and secondary paths make the garden an adventure and allow close up observation for wildlife Photo by Carol Bornstein The garden is a tapestry of colors and textures to delight the eye Since Los Angeles is a year round tourist destination the project team planned for colorful year round interest Visitors from mid winter Michigan or snow bound New York will be delighted and learn to appreciate the natural beauty of California Local residents will have a chance to see our native flora being appreciated and used to teach the next generation of environmental stewards The number of programs that use the garden as part of the curriculum is extensive and includes offerings such as the Christmas Bird Count GeckoWatch the Great Sunflower Project Pleistocene Garden Survey and ZomBee Watch What fun When in Los Angeles please visit the garden and look for some of our favorite natives Can you spot the tidy tips Layia platyglossa Palmer penstemon Penstemon palmeri tansy leaf phacelia Phacelia tanacetifolia Lilac verbena Verbena lilacina or even the elegant clarkia Clarkia unguiculata Send us photos of your visit and we will share them on our Gardening with Natives blog and our Facebook page Alicia Funk Double Portion of Good News We had an extra helping of edible native plant news from Alicia Funk recently for which we are thrilled First earlier this month the Bear Yuba Land Trust BYLT recognized her with the William Nickerl Award for Conservation Leadership Second Alicia generously donated a gift of proceeds from the book she co authored Living Wild Gardening Cooking and Healing with Native Plants of California to CNPS Spice Bush courtesy Bear Yuba Land Trust The William Nickerl Award is given to individuals who have inspired others through their passion to work toward land conservation I ve known Alicia for many years and have seen how her passion for our local natural environment has really captured her imagination said BYLT Executive Director Marty Coleman Hunt She has turned that passion into action by becoming our local expert on culinary and medicinal wild native plants and traditional uses by indigenous peoples She has advocated for our understanding and the use of them through tours and talks lectures writing and now filmmaking This award recognizes exactly these qualities among people like Alicia in our community She is committed to showing the positive impact that conservation easements and land trusts have on native plant populations In addition Alicia has a delightful and productive passion for edibles She started as a nature enthusiast I first made a deep connection with nature as a young child just spending hours playing in the woods which I felt were my home That initial love of the outdoors has guided me to protect and share the natural home I love said Alicia Funk Since then her journey has focused her creative talents on the native plans that surround her and who they can be used for productive purposes medicinal edible and educational Alicia Funk first learned plant based medicine in 1990 from an indigenous grandmother in Ecuador s rainforest She received her MBA in entrepreneurship and has 20 years of expertise in the field of natural living and wellness Funk introduced the Wellness Spa into Whole Foods Markets served as the director of The Crossings Wellness Center and is the editor of six books including The Botanical Safety Handbook Herbal Medicine The Expanded Commission E Monographs and The ABC Clinical Guide to Herbs She lived in the Santa Cruz area for a number of years and is now in the Nevada City area directing The Living Wild Project Her popular book published by Flicker Press is an exploration of our cultural heritage and a path to a more sustainable future 100 of the proceeds go to support the mission of CNPS and it is available for purchase from the CNPS online store The book is filled with plant selection cultivation and usage information attractively arranged and chock full of recipes and ideas It is as much a cookbook as a craft book and is a botanical reference guide a lot to accomplish in one graphically appealing volume She has recipes for acorns which Alicia likes to call oak nuts manzanita granola and grape leaves with wild berries Alicia teaches workshops frequently where you might learn a variety of skills including how to make oak nut flour Congratulate Alicia when you see her and we all thank her for the gift to CNPS Her generosity will help CNPS s mission protecting California s native plant heritage and preserving it for future generations 2015 BIG Day of Giving This year CNPS is excited to participate in the 2015 BIG Day of Giving on Tuesday May 5 2015 For 24 hours from midnight to midnight online donations will be accepted through bigdayofgiving org with a goal of 5 million for hundreds of nonprofits based in the Sacramento region Donations made to the California Native Plant Society through the BIG Day of Giving website on May 5 will be eligible for additional Incentive Pool funds and prizes Imagine a donation of only 25 could help CNPS win a 5000 prize Watch for our campaign on the CNPS Facebook page as the date approaches Upcoming CNPS Plant Science Workshops We are working on finalizing details for our 2015 Plant Science Workshops and have an exciting schedule in the works More details pricing and registration information will be posted very soon on the workshops webpage Please contact Becky Reilly Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view CNPS Events Coordinator for more information Measuring Monitoring Plant Populations Sierra Foothills Research Extension Center Browns Valley April 21 23 Introduction to Plant Family Identification Center for Earth Concerns Taft Gardens Ojai May 6 7 Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevé El Portal Community Center Yosemite National Park June 3 5 Introduction to Plant Family Identification Sagehen Field Station Truckee July 6 8 Vegetation Mapping Sacramento Area TBD Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevé TBD Mid Late Oct CEQA Impact Assessment Ventura Area Nov 4 5 Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the Horticulture Events Calendar Napa Valley Chapter Lunch and Learn Growing and Caring for CA Native Plants April 1 11 45 AM 1 00 PM Congregation Beth Shalom sponsors Lunch and Learn lunchtime educational talks on the first Wednesday of the month bring your own lunch Henni Cohen President of the Napa Chapter of the California Native Plant Society will share her experiences and knowledge about growing and caring for California Native Plants She will discuss how to select the right California Native for your garden and techniques for helping your garden survive the drought Representative plants will be on display Congregation Beth Shalom 1455 Elm St Napa El Dorado Chapter Spring Native Plant Sale Saturday April 4 9 00 AM 1 00 PM Our next sale will be April 4 2015 9 am to 1 pm It will take place in front of County Government Buildings A and B at 330 360 Fair Lane Placerville These buildings are directly across the street from the Main El Dorado County Library The sale will feature California native grasses flowering perennials shrubs and trees Some plants are deer resistant and many are drought tolerant once established Check out our Spring Plant Sale List This list is a reasonably not perfectly accurate look at what plants we expect to be selling It will give you time to study up and decide what meets your needs Whether your soil is heavy clay or serpentine whether you live in Folsom or Pollock Pines we can help you choose native plants that will fit your landscaping needs San Gabriel Mountains Chapter Field Trip Santa Fe Dam County Regional Park Saturday April 4 9 00 AM 12 00 PM A joint field trip with Southern California Botanists this trip will explore the last of the unique Riversidean alluvial scrub natural community in the San Gabriel Valley The walk will wind through over 400 acres of terraces of the San Gabriel River flood plain full of plants and animals that are declining elsewhere The leader is Mickey Long Mickey plans to discuss the ecosystem as a whole plants birds reptiles and the interesting successional vegetation levels tied to river hydrology California junipers valley cholla huge laurel sumacs giant Whipple yuccas live here along with Spring wildflower displays in open flats and resident cactus wrens and migrant birds We could walk to the site of Los Angeles County s only Hesperevax acaulis Directions Take the 210 Fwy to the Irwindale Ave off ramp Travel south on Irwindale Ave to Arrow Hwy then turn west to the Santa Fe Dam entrance drive on the right After the stop at the entrance kiosk fee approximately 6 per car turn right north following signs to the Nature Center to meet at 9 AM in the Nature Center parking lot at the north end of the basin Wear good sturdy shoes or boots hat and bring water Sacramento Valley Chapter Program Meeting Diversification of Ceanothus in California Wednesday April 8 7 00 PM Ceanothus is one of the best known groups of shrubs in western North America especially California It is appreciated by naturalists for the color it lends to spring landscapes by horticulturists and gardeners for the variety and beauty of its cultivars and by botanists for its interesting diversity of form and ecology There are about 53 species Ceanothus all restricted to North America Though the genus is widespread in the United States Canada and Mexico the center of diversity is in our very own state of California Dylan Burge grew up in rural northern California where he developed a love for biodiversity very early on He attended UC Davis and Duke University He has conducted post doctoral research in Australia and British Columbia and done field work around the world In addition to botanical research he likes to spend time hiking on the Pacific Crest Trail and taking photographs of plants in the wild He is also totally obsessed with Ceanothus Shepard Garden and Arts Center McKinley Park 3330 McKinley Blvd Sacramento North Coast Chapter Program Meeting Northern California Botanical Rarities Wednesday April 8 7 30 PM The North Coast Chapter s territory includes home to many rare plants CNPS Rare Plant Botanist and veteran botanical explorer Aaron Sims will impress you with how many provide some current knowledge about them and point out what we need to learn He will introduce a few recently described rare species from northern California as well as review some rare plants that have gone entirely unnoticed in recent decades At the Six Rivers Masonic Lodge 251 Bayside Rd Arcata Refreshments at 7 00 p m program at 7 30 p m Marin Chapter Spring Native Plant Sale Saturday April 11 9 30 AM 3 00 PM This year s sale is being held during California Native Plant Week Volunteers are busy propagating a variety of native perennials shrubs and bunchgrasses all drought tolerant plants all great for a home garden We ll also have a selection of annual wildflowers in 4 pots as well as a selection of larval host plants for the habitat gardener Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary 376 Greenwood Beach Road Tiburon CA Contact Kristin Jakob Los Angeles Santa Monica Mountains Chapter Program Meeting Life Springing Back After Spring Wildfire Tuesday April 14 7 30 PM 9 30 PM The May 2013 Spring Wildfire burned about 24 000 acres at the west end of the Santa Monica Mountains and north in Ventura County Big Sycamore Canyon was severely burned as were many wildland areas Unfortunately for the surviving wild fauna flora and resident seedbanks 2013 was the worst drought year on record The drought continued into the first half of 2014 Finally rainstorms returned in the second half of 2014 delivering more rain in six months than had fallen the previous twelve months What happened in the wild areas in Santa Monica Mountains besides shutting down Pacific Coast Highway under tons of mud and boulders The National Park staff is monitoring the resilience of flora and fauna in enduring and recovering from these disastrous events This program will show us the latest and best of wildlife recovery What has changed What is the same Come and see First United Methodist Church 1008 11th

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201503.php (2016-04-26)
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  • February 2015 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    unable to host trips in the California Deserts but we still had great turnout and results from the project The Central Coast RPTH was a huge success with many new and historically documented rare plant populations being discovered Volunteers came all the way from the Bay Area in the north to San Luis Obispo County in the south We also had a particularly strong showing of volunteers who led their own trips and submitted valuable rare plant data in fact these independent trip leaders accounted for about half of the 361 rare plant observations in 2014 We greatly appreciate all of the work that our volunteers do and admire their passion for rare plant science and conservation Our 2014 award winners are listed on the Award Winners page here California Native Plant Week 2015 In 2010 our state legislature adopted Resolution ACR 173 to inaugurate California Native Plant Week This year this festive celebration of our heritage will take place April 11 19 2015 CNPS chapters and others are encouraged to plan events for members and the general public In honor of California Native Plant Week a new set of resources has been added to the California Native Plant Week page on the CNPS website This site has event history and links to the Horticulture Calendar where all of the CNPS events are on display Additionally we have put together a special section for CNPS chapter use that is the California Native Plant Week Toolkit Here chapters and partners will find a project guide templates for events and press release information as well as ideas for celebrating and some fun heritage facts For questions and more information on CNPW please contact Horticulture Program Director Susan Krzywicki Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view 2015 BIG Day of Giving BIG Day of Giving is a collaboration of GiveLocalNow and local community foundations in the Greater Sacramento region This year CNPS is excited to participate in the 2015 BIG Day of Giving on Tuesday May 5 2015 For 24 hours online donations will be accepted through bigdayofgiving org with a goal of 5 million for hundreds of regional nonprofits Donations made to California Native Plant Society at bigdayofgiving org on May 5 will be eligible for additional Incentive Pool funds a donation of only 25 may help CNPS win a 2500 prize Watch for our campaign on our Facebook page as the date approaches Upcoming CNPS Plant Science Workshops We are working on finalizing details for our 2015 Plant Science Workshops and have an exciting schedule in the works More details pricing and registration information will be posted very soon on the workshops webpage Please contact Becky Reilly Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view CNPS Events Coordinator for more information Rare Plant Survey Protocols A Scientific Approach Borges Ranch Walnut Creek March 24 25 CNDDB BIOS CDFW Office of Training Development Sacramento March 26 Measuring Monitoring Plant Populations Sierra Foothills Research Extension Center Browns Valley April 21

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201502.php (2016-04-26)
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  • January 2015 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    impacts to the desert are clear it is not certain how durable newly designated ACECs or NLCS lands would be under the DRECP For example could a future BLM land use plan amendment eliminate conservation land designations gained through the DRECP How will we fund the management and enforcement needed to ensure newly designated conservation lands remain viable for species and communities The draft DRECP does not clarify these questions Much remains to be resolved before the DRECP represents the lofty conservation opportunity it set out to be and a desert conservation plan that CNPS could support For more information on CNPS s input into the DRECP process contact Conservation Program Director Greg Suba Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view Map A larger image PDF 8MB Green areas are legally off limits to development Pink DFAs and orange areas are areas of potential energy development Grey areas are military lands Purple represents documented occurrences of the 10 plant Covered Species and aqua represents the modeled habitat for the same 10 plant Covered Species The distribution of the 10 plants are across the western Mojave region of the DRECP Plan Area There are no plant Covered Species related to DFAs near Pahrump across Chuckwalla Valley to Blythe or in Imperial Valley Map B larger image PDF 8MB The black areas represent approximately 450 000 acres prioritized by DRECP agencies as the DRECP s NCCP Reserve The black areas would provide only a portion of the Plan wide conservation area and management needed to meet the conservation and recovery of the DRECP s NCCP Covered Species plants and animals 80 of the black area is BLM managed public lands where the durability of conservation remains a question Map C larger image PDF 10MB The draft DRECP proposes to provide for the balance of NCCP Covered Species conservation needs via new and revised BLM ACEC and NLCS designations There is real opportunity to establish BLM conservation areas and management actions for desert native plants through the DRECP s BLM LUPA process Establishing the durability of new designations and identifying new federal funding to staff and manage them will be necessary Map D larger image PDF 10MB The BLM LUPA will also designate new Special Recreation Management Acreas SRMAs many of which will allow for OHV activity on designated routes The overlap of SRMA ACEC and NLCS designations further clouds the conservation benefit provided by the DRECP s BLM LUPA process and its relationship to the DRECP NCCP conservation strategy CNPS Inventory Updates Aaron E Sims H winteri photo by Brook Moyers larger H winteri photo by Brook Moyers H winteri photo by John Stebbins larger Winter s sunflower a new woody perennial known from less than ten locations in the world It never ceases to amaze me how much there still is to learn about the native flora of California The population of the state has surpassed 38 million people yet we still do not have a firm number on the native plant species it contains albeit of that 38 million botanists are only numbered in the hundreds That s why I was excited but also surprised to hear from John Stebbins a botanist from California s Central Valley regarding a sunflower he recently described from the southern Sierra Nevada foothills Winter s sunflower Helianthus winteri Of all the plants that have been described from California in the 21st century a woody sunflower reaching 13 feet tall was one of the least that I expected To add to my surprise the location in which it was first collected is directly adjacent to Highway 180 east of Fresno a major thoroughfare to and from Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Lastly to my astonishment it produces flowers all year long and yes that includes January Perhaps I should have reminded myself that California still remains a floristic frontier with projections that roughly 10 percent of the native flora is still not described But still doesn t this conjure up cryptic plants or otherwise ephemeral or diminutive species Winter s sunflower stands as a reminder that there is still a lot of work to be done in new species discovery More importantly however it stands as a reminder that we all must strive to conserve what is left of California s natural heritage and safeguard it for future generations to marvel explore and continue the discovery To find out more about Winter s sunflower visit its profile in the CNPS Online Inventory or contact me at Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view Reviewing the Rare Plant Watch List Danny Slakey The CNPS Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants includes Rank 4 a watch list of rare plants The Rank 4 plants generally have a limited distribution or are infrequent throughout a broader area in California There are currently 585 of these plants included in the CNPS Inventory but they often do not receive the same amount of attention as their rarer counterparts on Rank 1B or 2B do Their overall abundance and distribution are not as well known as many of our other rare plants Eriogonum shockleyi var shockleyi is currently a Rank 4 plant in the CNPS Inventory but is only known from about 5 populations in California Photo by James M Andre We decided it was time to take a closer look at these plants as the Rare Plant Program has not systematically evaluated the plants on this Rank in recent years With the help of volunteers we gathered data from online botanical resources compiled it and reviewed it to develop a list of 67 plants that may be much rarer than previously thought We still need the knowledge of local experts however as some or many of these plants could just be under collected Currently we are looking for data on these 67 different Rank 4 plants by soliciting feedback from botanical experts around the State This will help us separate out the under collected plants

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  • December 2014 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    we learn the impact of over watering and chemical dependent techniques Native plants are the most ecologically beneficial solutions any gardener can embody They are naturally low water use solutions do not require chemical fertilizers and pesticides provide a unique caterpillar host relationship to allow for abundant butterfly populations provide the best nectar pollen and habitat for butterflies bees and birds and give a sense of place that no other plant palette can provide Garden Sign Toolkit Along with the sign a new set of resources has been added to the CNPS website called Chapter Toolkit Garden Signs We have provided a quick presentation that you can add to a chapter meeting colorful and short it tells people what the program is about shows the signs and points them in the right direction to the CNPS online store to order Along with the presentation is a project guide with useful background information along with 3 Ps of Native Plant Gardening Color pdf 1 6MB BW pdf 946kb Garden Sign Partner Letter docx 7kb to use if you would like to see the signs selling in a local botanic garden or nursery Garden Sign Press Release docx 35 kb to use in your local market or post at your chapter website Garden Sign Photograph Copyright Release pdf 98kb we d love to see lots of photographs of people showing off their signs in their own garden send us your photos and we will publish them send to skrzywicki cnps org The information has been prepared by a group of experts in horticulture soil biology plant communities biology wildlife and conservation Please visit the page We look forward to receiving photos and reports from your events California Native Plant Week 2015 In 2010 the California Legislature adopted Assembly Concurrent Resolution 173 to inaugurate an annual California Native Plant Week CNPW The next dates for this festive celebration of our heritage are April 11th to the 19th 2015 As drought and climate change issues continue to affect our daily lives we have enhanced our statewide horticulture program for CNPW California Native Plant Week is a week dedicated to the appreciation education and conservation of California s fabulous flora The legislation was sponsored by CNPS and introduced by Senator Noreen Evens during the 2010 legislative session to help protect California s native plant heritage and preserve it for future generations by raising awareness about our state s rich botanical diversity California Native Plant Society promotes CNPW through native plant sales wildflower shows gardening workshops lectures hikes and many more events CNPW events like these allow all California residents to take an active role in preserving the majesty of California s native flora From the Coast redwood to the California poppy the more than 6 000 plants that are native to California are special Each is perfectly adapted to grow without care in one or more of the myriad habitats in our Golden State Coastal bluff or oak woodland mountain slope or forest floor and many more Celebrate in your daily life Join the festivities Celebrate CNPW with a visit to a local botanical garden or arboretum Talk to an expert at a nursery or take a walk in a preserve Join a native garden tour Plant a native Check with your local chapter for events and be sure to look at the CNPW calendar at cnps org Toolkits for chapter use In honor of CNPW a new set of resources has been added to the CNPS website for chapters This page has information and downloads to introduce CNPW at a chapter meeting activities and guidelines for events ideas for celebrating some fun heritage facts Press Release and marketing templates for your use including a customizable brochure that can be tailored to local needs and printed professionally or saved as a PDF and added on your chapter site There are also links to professionals who can help homeowners do it yourself resources and connections to our local chapters that have the best information about plants in specific regions The information has been prepared by a group of experts in horticulture soil biology plant communities biology wildlife and conservation We look forward to receiving photos and reports from your events For questions and more information please contact CNPS Horticulture Program Director Susan Krzywicki at 619 318 4590 or skrzywicki cnps org California Bees Blooms Did you know that California is home to sixteen hundred species of wild bees many of which are native species And get this these bees provide about 38 percent of California s crop pollination at a value of up to 2 4 billion annually It s a good thing that people are studying these bees to figure out how to help them thrive and an even better thing that they re sharing the knowledge with us in the form of this beautiful new guidebook With its vivid colorful photos and equally colorful descriptions of bees and flowers California Bees and Blooms A Guide for Gardeners and Naturalists makes a great addition to any collection of gardening books or backyard nature guides This new guidebook from Heyday and CNPS holds a magnifying glass up to the twenty two most common genera and six species of cuckoo bees describing each one s distinctive behaviors social structures flight season preferred flowers and enemies In addition to opening our eyes to the beautiful array of wild bees in our midst this book provides information on fifty three bee friendly plants and how to grow them Just a few square feet of poppies sage and phacelia are enough to sustain a healthy population of wild bees transforming an urban or suburban garden into a world that hums and buzzes with life Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the

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  • November 2014 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    will be contacted to have your car picked up at a time and location convenient to you You will receive a tow receipt when the vehicle is picked up and thirty days after the vehicle is sold you will receive an acknowledgement If your vehicle sells for over 500 you will receive IRS Form 1098 B C for your taxes It s really that simple Introducing the New and Improved CNPS Store Check out our new and improved webstore featuring items like our Native Plants Live Here garden sign and our newest publication release from the Redbud Chapter Trees and Shrubs of Nevada and Placer Counties California The perfect place for holiday gift ideas nature journaling kits for children of all ages posters and an abundance of field guides and resources on native plant gardening  Look for even more exciting new releases in 2015 CNPS Membership Makes a Great Green Gift Do you know someone who appreciates native plants and relishes the variety of breathtaking landscapes we enjoy in California Maybe your neighbor is an avid water wise gardener your niece is studying plant biology at university or your father in law has albums of wildflower photos he has taken over the years Stumped as to what to get them for the holidays A membership in CNPS makes a great gift In addition to plant sales seminars gardening workshops field hikes evening programs and conservation efforts driven by 34 CNPS chapters throughout California and Baja CNPS members enjoy discounts at nearly 40 nurseries and garden stores across the state Click this link to see a list of all CNPS membership benefits including subscription discounts to Bay Nature and Pacific Horticulture discounted environmental consulting and landscape design services It s easy to give a gift membership Simply fill out the online membership form and provide the name and address of your recipient in the Comments field You can t give a greener gift  CNPS 2015 Conservation Conference Silent Auction Donations Do you have artwork books wine botanical supplies gardening accessories vacation getaways camping gear jewerly professional services or any other items of beauty value or interest that you would like to donate to the Silent Auction at the CNPS 2015 Conservation Conference in January If so please download and fill out the Auction Donor Form PDF Proceeds from the silent auction go to support the CNPS Conservation Program Nothing to donate but time Consider joining the Silent Auction Committee and soliciting donations or volunteering at the conference Email Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view with your auction donation questions or to volunteer Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the Horticulture Events Calendar Santa Clara Valley Chapter GWN Harvesting Your Native Plants for Many Uses Monday December 1 7 00 8 30 PM Join us for a talk explaining the relationship of California native plants to indigenous peoples and how these plants can be used today John Kipping will tell us how native plants can be used for food medicine and material sources especially for basketry Mr Kipping will demonstrate Pomo style coiled weaving His talk will include a display of specimens books and artifacts He will also show us how to make manzanita cider Milpitas Library 160 N Main Street Milpitas South Coast Chapter Annual Potluck Desserts and Open Slide Show Monday December 1 7 30 PM Bring your favorite plant photos and desserts to share Put your best plant and expedition photos on a thumb drive to show them on the big screen in our annual member slide show South Coast Botanic Garden 26300 Crenshaw Blvd Palos Verdes Peninsula CA 90274 Yerba Buena Chapter Annual Members Slides and Potluck Supper Thursday December 4 2014 Join our annual year end informal members potluck dinner and slide show Please bring your favorite slides or digital images and your favorite dish or beverage to share There will be no restaurant dinner or plant identification workshop preceding this meeting Whether you are a photographer or a plant fan come for an enjoyable evening of delicious food and great pictures The potluck starts at 6 30 and the slides start at 7 30 Email Kipp McMichael at Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view or call 510 759 3178 for information about showing your pictures Recreation Room Francisco County Fair Building Golden Gate Park San Francisco Bristlecone Chapter Deadline for Mary DeDecker Botanical Grant Applications Friday December 5 Grants for research and projects that increase the understanding and appreciation of native plants and ecosystems in the Eastern Sierra are available to graduate students college students and primary and secondary students K 12 Research projects need not be academic or scholarly but must be relevant to the native plants of the northern Mojave Desert Sierra Nevada and Great Basin portions of eastern California Applications must include written support from a major advisor or teacher Grant recipients receive up to 1 000 each for expenses and are asked to present their results to the Bristlecone Chapter either at a regular meeting or in the chapter newsletter All applicants will be notified of the committee s decision by the end of January More information and application http bristleconecnps org dedecker grant index php Santa Cruz County Chapter Field Trip Hike to Chalk Mountain Saturday December 6 9 30 AM 2 30 PM Hike to Chalk Mountain 1609 with Deanna Giuliano Enjoy spectacular panoramic views and amazing redwoods on the way up to a coastal scrub habitat Strenuous elevation gain of about 1500 4 miles round trip Bring water layers sunscreen hat and a lunch Meet at Westside New Leaf parking lot 1101 Fair Ave Santa Cruz Heavy rain cancels Please contact Deanna Giuliano for any questions or to RSVP trip is limited

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