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  • February 2014 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    where the loss of one species could have a profound impact upon the ecosystem as a whole After three months of field surveys little evidence of white pine blister rust was detected among the whitebark stands visited Mountain pine beetle attacks see photo 2 however were prevalent but not decimating populations on a large scale as seen in the Rocky Mountains Overall most of the 90 whitebark pine stands visited had good to excellent site quality and viability by California Natural Diversity Database CNDDB standards Yet to fully understand whitebark pine health in our state more areas need to be visited and assessed for example more assessment is needed in Inyo National Forest where whitebark pine stands dominate at high altitudes of the eastern Sierra Nevada We hope that with further assessments and long term monitoring of stands we can understand and evaluate the fate of whitebark pine in our state U S EPA to Present Top Award to Sacramento Scientists The U S Environmental Protection Agency s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest Jared Blumenfeld will present Sacramento California based scientists and Sacramento Valley Chapter members Dr Robert Holland and Carol Witham the Region s prestigious Environmental Champion award at a ceremony at the Splash Education Center in Mather Calif on Tuesday March 4 Dr Robert Holland and Carol Witham will be recognized for their work protecting California s vernal pools a threatened variety of wetland through education research and outreach The non profit Splash Center was founded in part by Ms Witham and provides children educational lessons about vernal pools through classroom instruction and field exploration The award presentation is Tuesday March 4 2014 10 00 am at the Splash Education Center 4426 Excelsior Road Mather CA 95655 If you plan on attending please RSVP with David Yogi 415 972 3350 Help Cal IPC Reprint Don t Plant a Pest Brochures The California Invasive Plant Council Cal IPC is getting ready to reprint some of their fantastic regional Don t Plant a Pest brochures a great outreach tool to help keep wildland weeds out of landscaping Both the Mount Lassen Chapter of CNPS and Friends of Bidwell Park have pledged financial support for the reprinting of the Central Valley version of Don t Plant a Pest If you would like to help please contact Doug Johnson at Cal IPC to suggest changes to the brochure or to offer financial support for the reprinting Upcoming CNPS Workshops For full workshop descriptions and registration please click here Questions Email Josie Crawford CNPS Education Program Director at Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view March 11 12 Rare Plant Survey Protocols A Scientific Approach Taught by Heath Bartosh Aaron Sims with a lecture by Roxanne Bittman Location CDFW Yolo Bypass Visitors Center Davis and West Sacramento Cost CNPS members 310 Non members 345 March 13 Online Tools for botanists and biologists Taught by Roxanne Bittman Sandra Summers Location Office of Training and Development Sacramento CA Cost 150 may be

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201402.php (2016-04-26)
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  • January 2014 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    www cnps org cnps education grants php It s Not Too Late to Help CNPS Double a Special Donation Last month a generous donor gave 27K in support of the CNPS Rare Campaign for rare plants and places asking that we use their gift to inspire others to contribute Will you please help to match that generous gift It s easy to donate to the Rare Campaign Just click here As always donations to support the important work of CNPS are tax deductible 2014 CNPS Workshops For full workshop descriptions and registration please click here Questions Email Josie Crawford CNPS Education Program Director at Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view February 11 13 Vegetation Mapping Taught by Todd Keeler Wolf Julie Evens and John Menke Location University of Redlands Redlands CA Cost CNPS members 665 Non members 690 March 11 12 Rare Plant Survey Protocols A Scientific Approach Taught by Heath Bartosh Aaron Sims with a lecture by Roxanne Bittman Location CDFW Yolo Bypass Visitors Center Davis and West Sacramento Cost CNPS members 310 Non members 345 March 13 Online Tools for botanists and biologists Taught by Roxanne Bittman Sandra Summers Location Office of Training and Development Sacramento CA Cost 150 may be taken together with workshop above or separately April 1 2 Introduction to Plant Family Identification Taught by David L Magney Location Casitas Springs Ventura County Cost 310 CNPS members 345 non members April 15 17 Spring Flora of the Eastern Mojave a Focus on Five Formidable Families Taught by Jim Andre and Tasha LaDoux Location UC Granite Mountains Desert Research Center Mojave National Preserve eastern Mojave Cost CNPS members 360 non members 395 April 29 May 1 Measuring and Monitoring Plant Populations Taught by John Willoughby Location UC Santa Cruz Arboretum Santa Cruz CA Cost CNPS members 395 Non members 430 May 27 29 Herbarium Specimen Collecting for Floristic Work Taught by Nick Jensen and Heath Bartosh Locations Tejon Ranch Conservancy Lebec and Tehachapi Mountain Region Kern County Cost CNPS members 360 Non members 395 Early June TBA Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevà Workshop Taught by Julie Evens and Jennifer Buck Diaz Location Orange County CA Cost Members 330 Non members 365 September TBA Vegetation Rapid Assessment Location Shasta or Tehama County Cost TBA Click here to register or read full workshops descriptions Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Even more events from CNPS chapters and partners can be viewed on the Horticulture Events Calendar Bristlecone Chapter Fish Slough Exploration Saturday February 8 9 00 AM We will join Friends of the Inyo and the Sierra Club s Range of Light Chapter for an exploration of the Fish Slough area just north of the city of Bishop We will be viewing endemic plant communities restoration sites unique human history and the endemic Owens Valley Pupfish in the alkali

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201401.php (2016-04-26)
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  • December 2013 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    Brien the East Bay Regional Parks Botanic Garden s New Director Sue Rosenthal When Wayne Roderick learned that Steve Edwards had been hired to succeed him after he retired as director of the Regional Parks Botanic Garden he knew the garden would be in good hands Now Steve is happily welcoming his successor Bart O Brien Continue reading here In Praise of Bart O Brien Emily Green Expecting a generous reaction to the news that Bart O Brien is taking over directorship of the Regional Parks Botanic Garden in the Bay Area s Tilden Park asks too much of an Angeleno Berkeley s gain is a staggering loss for Southern California specifically for the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden where O Brien has worked for more than 20 years As Rancho s director of horticulture and later leader of its special projects O Brien introduced generations of homeowners and no few directors of water companies to plants perfectly adapted to our dry climate The importance of this work cannot be overstated These stoic plants and not squelching lawn will green our cities as more people are faced with getting along on less water Continue reading here Upcoming CNPS Workshop Vegetation Mapping Workshop Instructors Dr Todd Keeler Wolf CDFW John Menke AIS and Julie Evens CNPS Location University of Redlands and the Potrero unit of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area Dates February 11 13 2014 Course Description Participants will learn about vegetation sampling classification and photo interpretation in this hands on workshop presented jointly by CNPS California Department of Fish and Wildlife CNFW and Aerial Information Systems AIS In field and computer lab exercises you will practice creating a vegetation map using Geographic Information Systems collect reconnaissance samples supporting an existing vegetation classification and practice techniques of photo interpretation delineation and attribution You will also learn how to validate a vegetation map through accuracy assessment Experience with GIS is recommended but not required Cost Members 665 Non members 690 Registration open now Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Santa Clara Valley Chapter Field Trip Año Nuevo State Preserve Wednesday January 1 10 00 AM 2 00 PM Join us as we celebrate a Chapter tradition of welcoming the New Year with a walk and picnic at Año Nuevo State Preserve on the San Mateo County coast The preserve is located south of Pescadero on Highway 1 just north of the Santa Cruz County line Meet in the parking lot 10 day use fee at 10 am Latecomers will find us on the trail in the coastal prairie We ll enjoy sea cliff vegetation raptors songbirds and maybe marine mammals We will face a moderate high tide at noon but should be able to picnic on the beach in the area in which seal tour reservations are not required As this is a day to

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201312.php (2016-04-26)
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  • November 2013 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    right corner The Criteria Matches and Total Matches columns in the Advanced Search page are extremely useful for gaining quick statistics and information about plants in the Inventory If for instance you are interested in knowing how many eriastrum plants are currently in the Inventory simply type Eriastrum into the Genus section at the top of the search criteria and the total number will automatically be generated and shown in the Matches column see screenshot 3 Many of the questions I often get asked can be answered by doing some simple criteria searches in the Advanced Search page of the Inventory Try it for yourself today and as always if you have questions don t hesitate to ask me at Email address protected by JavaScript Enable JavaScript to view Responding to Wildfire in California CNPS Veg Crew examine post fire growth on a hike in the Sierras In the aftermath of wildfires that swept through California this summer alarmist voices are once again calling for the suspension of environmental protections to expedite and increase logging of post fire habitat and mandate increased commercial logging of unburned forests Such activity would seriously undermine the ecological integrity of forest ecosystems on federal lands We have seen this post fire response before Following catastrophic wildfires in 2002 similar efforts to suspend regulations and expedite commercial logging occurred Below are passages excerpted from an August 2002 letter from CNPS to then U S National Forest Chief Dale Bosworth reprinted here to demonstrate CNPS s long standing position on forest wildfire and fuels management and to reiterate the need to break the cycle of misunderstanding that plays out time and again in response to wildfires in the United States Though some points in the full letter could be updated by over a decade of wildfire research and data the core messages are as relevant today as they were 11 years ago Wildfires large and small are a natural and necessary ecological agent of disturbance in California Where there might be opportunities to treat forest fuels in order to reduce fire intensity and promote the resilience of post fire forests treatment decisions must focus on areas adjacent to human communities and must foster rather than degrade sustainable forest ecosystems dominated by native species Rather than push through regulations based on blame and fear we must let science direct the most appropriate management course forward Lastly the comments in the following excerpts refer to fire and fuels management specific to forested systems Appropriate management strategies for forests are not directly translatable to California s shrub dominated chaparral systems From August 2002 CNPS is aware that misunderstanding has yet again arisen from the terrible wildfires that are occurring throughout the western United States this season We are deeply saddened by the loss of life and property that these fires have caused However we are also disappointed by the poor policy conclusions that appear to be emerging from the fires Some in the timber industry some elected officials and even some Forest Service staff claim that failure to log national forests is the primary cause of the severity of this fire season and that uncompromising opposition to logging by the environmental and scientific communities is the primary factor that has prevented logging allowed fuels to build up and made national forests more flammable These claims are false Those who are making them should cease to do so These claims have of course been made in the past They have consistently been abandoned because they are supported by neither science n or history It is unfortunate that time must once again be wasted in discussion of these absurd theories particularly because they have only become increasingly groundless as research and advocacy on fire and forest management have progressed The purpose of this letter is to clarify the position of CNPS regarding fire and fuels management on national forests Like most in the scientific and conservation community CNPS is neither in favor of or opposed to logging per se Instead we advocate forest fire and fuels management practices that minimize danger to lives and property create and maintain sustainable productive forest ecosystems dominated by viable native species conserve rare and imperiled species through their natural ranges protect water quality and supply soils and other forest ecosystem services and resources Pursuant to these principles we have consistently supported forest management projects that reduce fuels and fire risk adjacent to populated areas Near populated areas we support mechanical removal of biomass thinning of small trees and brush installation of fuel breaks safe use of prescribed burning and other methods to accomplish this goal We like others in California s scientific and conservation community have repeatedly asked both the Pacific Southwest Region and individual National Forests to develop a fuels treatment prioritization based on threats to lives and property In addition fuels treatment should be prioritized based on quantitative science based assessments of site specific fire hazard fuel loading and fire risk so that scarce staff and funding can be used where they will have the most effect CNPS advocates the restoration of fire through careful use of prescribed and prescribed natural fire to areas where fire suppression has disrupted normal fire regimes The expanded use of ecologically appropriate prescribed fire and prescribed natural fire would accomplish dual goals the improvement of forest health and the reduction of fuel loading and therefore fire hazard Ecologically appropriate fire is a fire regime that attempts to replicate the season of burning intensity of burning and the interval between burns that an area experienced before European settlement A basic principle of ecosystem management and conservation biology is that because species and ecosystems evolved through exposure to pre European environmental conditions those are the conditions that are most likely to maintain long term species viability and ecosystem health CNPS recognizes that prescribed fire can be unacceptably dangerous in areas adjacent to populated areas In many such cases we also recognize that mechanical removal of fuels is the only

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201311.php (2016-04-26)
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  • October 2013 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    need photos from the Central Valley North Coast Ranges and South Coast Click this link for examples of the type of photos we are seeking CNPS Selected For G2 Gallery s Annual Stocking Fundraiser The California Native Plant Society has been chosen as one of the eight non profit organizations featured as part of G2 Gallery s annual Stocking Fundraiser Stockings will be hung in the gallery labeled by organization name and guests are encouraged to donate to the nonprofits of their choice Holiday stockings will be on display from Nov 28 Dec 31 Of special interest to CNPS members from November 9 January 5 the G2 Gallery is showing From the Ashes A California Wildfire Recovery photographed by Michael Caley featuring never before seen images following the devastating 2009 Station Fire in the Angeles National Forest The opening reception will be November 9 from 6 30 9 00 PM and includes wine hors d oeuvres and complimentary valet service Proceeds from the 10 admission fee benefit CNPS Please RSVP to rsvp theg2gallery com The G2 Gallery is located at 1503 Abbot Kinney Blvd Venice CA 90291 On Facebook Join the CNPS Facebook Group If you re on Facebook consider joining the CNPS Facebook Group Facebook Groups unlike fan pages were designed to make it easier for people with a common interest to communicate and share content with each other On the CNPS Group you can post a picture of a mystery plant and have people from across the state pitch in their best guesses Share events in your area or find out about a new species that was discovered near your town Recent pictures include showy buckwheats succulents from the desert and coastal islands and dainty ferns flourishing in the cool fall season Have a question about the use of redwood as mulch what species to plant in your Orange County yard or if the desert is blooming yet Get the answers online and make a few comments of your own With almost 3 000 members socially connected on the CNPS Facebook Group we can all share our knowledge and passion for native plants Northern California Botanists to Present a Symposium On January 13 14 2014 Northern California Botanists will present a two day symposium titled Northern California Plant Life Botany for a Changing World at California State University Chico plus a third day of workshops Also included a poster session reception banquet keynote speaker Student stipends available For details see www norcalbotanists org Upcoming CNPS Workshop Vegetation Mapping Workshop Instructors Dr Todd Keeler Wolf CDFW John Menke AIS and Julie Evens CNPS Location CNPS California Department of Fish and Wildlife CNFW and Aerial Information Systems AIS University of Redlands and the Potrero unit of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area Dates Feb 11 13 2014 Course Description Participants will learn about vegetation sampling classification and photo interpretation in this hands on workshop presented jointly by CNPS CDFW and AIS In field and computer lab exercises you will practice creating a vegetation map using Geographic Information Systems collect reconnaissance samples supporting an existing vegetation classification and practice techniques of photo interpretation delineation and attribution You will also learn how to validate a vegetation map through accuracy assessment Experience with GIS is recommended but not required Cost Members 665 Non members 690 Registration opens soon Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters East Bay Chapter Point Isabel Native Plant Restoration Work Party Saturday November 2 10 00 AM 2 00 PM Come out and help remove invasive plants and re vegetate with native plants grown from plants found at the site Tools provided Bring water and a hat We are at the end of Rydin Road just off the I 580 next to Hoffman Marsh See this link for a map of the location Point Isabel Regional Shoreline Organized by Tom and Jane Kelly Contact Email or call 510 684 6484 San Gabriel Mountains Chapter Fall Native Plant Sale Saturday November 9 9 00 AM 2 00 PM A large variety of well priced and unusual California native plants and wildflower seeds will be available Appropriate forgardens in the Los Angeles Basin these beautiful native plants provide good habitat and are attractive to birds butterflies and hummingbirds Many are drought tolerant requiring less water than most other garden plants Knowledgeable chapter members will be on hand to answer questions and offer recommendations CNPS members receive a discount memberships are available at the sale A plant list is available at http www cnps sgm org garden plantsale php Eaton Canyon Nature Center 1750 N Altadena Drive Pasadena CA 91107 Riverside San Bernardino Chapter Plant Sale and Free Landscaping Workshop Saturday November 9 9 00 AM 3 00 PM Make your garden water wise beautiful wildlife friendly and save on your water bills Popular and hard to find native plants seeds and bulbs Experts will be on hand to answer your questions during the sale Discounts and prizes available for new and renewing CNPS members 11 AM 12 30 PM a free workshop Landscaping with California Native Plants will be taught by Susan Jett Learn how California natives save water and animal and insect species and why fall and early winter are the best times to plant WMWD Landscapes Southern California Style Water Conservation Gardens 450 E Alessandro Blvd Riverside 92508 Mount Lassen Chapter Sunday November 10 10 00 AM Old USDA Plant Introduction Station Arboretum The group will meet at 10 a m at the Mendocino National Forest Genetics and Conservation Resource Center on Cramer Lane to see some of the original trees including Tung oil Shantung maple and camptotheca that originated those industries Includes an easy paved nature trail 2741 Cramer Ln Chico CA 95973 For information call Wes Dempsey at 893 5123 Redbud Chapter Briar Patch Work Day Sunday November 10 8 30 AM

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201310.php (2016-04-26)
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  • September 2013 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    the devastating 2009 Station Fire in the Angeles National Forest With special access as a U S Forest volunteer Caley was in a unique position to document every state of the forest s recovery and restoration From the Ashes will display the entire spectrum â from natural pristine beauty to landscapes filled with ash and charred trees to an increasingly healthy forest on the path to recovery The opening reception will be held on November 9 from 6 30 9 00 PM Admission is 10 at the door and includes wine hors d oeuvres and complimentary valet All proceeds from admissions will be donated to CNPS RSVP here The G2 Gallery is located at 1503 Abbot Kinney Blvd Venice CA 90291 From the Ashes will be on exhibit through January 5 Theodore Paine Foundation Seeks Full Time Executive Director As a result of the growing demand for native landscapes and habitat preservation throughout LA combined with Theodore Payne Foundation s expansion plans the Foundation Board has decided to transition from a part time to a full time Executive Director The position description together with details for submitting applications are available at http www theodorepayne org jobs html Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State To connect to your local chapter or to find other events in your region see this page for a list and map of CNPS chapters Alta Peak Chapter Fall Native Plant Sale Saturday October 5 9 30 AM 4 00 PM CNPS members are admitted 30 minutes before the general public at 9 00 AM to get the first pick Not a member Join at the door A great selection of native plants and a wide selection of books will be available for sale For more information call Janet Fanning at 559 561 3461 Dorothy King Young Chapter Fall Native Plant Sale Gualala Saturday October 5 9 00 AM 1 00 PM Lots of locally native plants available for sale and experts on hand to answer questions We ll be on the deck behind the Gualala Hotel Gualala Hotel 39301 S Hwy 1 Gualala 95445 El Dorado Chapter Fall Native Plant Sale Saturday October 5 9 00 AM 1 00 PM We offer grasses perennials shrubs and trees suitable for the foothills of El Dorado County as well as seed packets of native spring annuals and native plant bulbs In front of County Government Buildings A and B at 330 360 Fair Lane Placerville across from the library 330 Fair Lane Placerville 95667 North Coast Chapter Fall Native Plant Sale Saturday October 5 10 00 AM 3 00 PM Bayside Grange 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd Fall is planting time Be ready for the fall rains Find a selection of beautiful hardy wildlife friendly native plants for your yard Luxuriant ferns varied ground covers cheerful perennials dense shrubs and trees and graceful grasses from local forests meadows dunes and wetlands as well as favorite species from greater California will be available Experienced gardeners will be on

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201309.php (2016-04-26)
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  • August 2013 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    spurge Euphorbia exstipulata nine awned pappus grass Enneapogon desvauxii and perhaps you may find Mexican panicgrass Panicum hirticaule the newest addition to the CNPS inventory and a plant we worked with last summer that is now under threat in California by large scale solar projects Eastern Mojave The most promising areas this summer look like they may be the northern section of the Sonoran desert and the east Mojave Summer annuals are special because it takes just the right natural events for them to occur and succeed something that can happen in just the blink of an eye We hope to see some of you rare plant hunters out there this season as we go in search for some of these hardy brave and at times reclusive plants Rare Plants on the Central Coast In 2013 the Rare Plant Treasure Hunt made its debut on the Central Coast of California with a big emphasis on the Ventana and Silver Peak Wilderness Areas near Big Sur We had some great experiences searching for rare plants and noxious weeds with the volunteers who came out on these trips becoming very familiar with Corky Matthew s Monterey County Flora braving trails lined with poison oak gaining up to 3000 feet of elevation in a single day and soaking in natural hot springs creeks and pools at day s end Continue reading here The Unexpected Wonder By Kim Clark click image to view larger Desert treasure hunts hold the opportunity to find rare plants filling their niches with flowers after seasonal rains Unbridled delight seeps in as we hike through habitat in its full bloom glory when both flora and fauna are caught taking advantage of the nutrients and resources du jour to further their procreation agendas And it s often in this profuse interaction that we enjoy a peak human experience wonder Plants and animals are entirely interdependent down to the microscopic and molecular levels And at the macroscopic our camera lens discovers the tiniest of insects busy in the tiniest of niches within the milkweed flower setting us to wonder about the details of their intimate relationship The ingenious desert tortoise waits near its self dug watering trough ready to wade in after rain and drink its fill Giant saguaro swells with hundreds of gallons of tiny water molecules towering with ginormous mass and stamina against the coming uncertainty as the half inch Linanthus goes from seed to flower to seed in just a few weeks Hoards of caterpillars consume entire plants leaving nothing but cocoons and a dense scattering of recycled nitrogen Beetles feast display and mate Tiny toads fatten up before estivation and the mysteries of the past whisper from voluptuous sand dunes and pottery shards lying in the sun At dusk our thoughts turn to the beauty of our ecosystems and the amazing life cycles we were privileged to witness Our minds brighten imagination and creativity stir and we rise to meet the new day Chapter Events A Sampling

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201308.php (2016-04-26)
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  • July 2013 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    Coast ranges of Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties California Itwas named in honor of Clare Butterworth Hardham 1918 2010 a botanist from Paso Robles that studied the flora of the Santa Lucia Mountains Santa Lucia monkeyflower occurs in sandy soils of chaparral and in sand filled crevices of sandstone outcrops Itis known from approximately six occurrences mostly from Fort Hunter Liggett and is threatened by development and possibly threatened by grazing road maintenance and non native plants With a small distribution and number of occurrences along with threats Santa Lucia monkeyflower was added to CRPR 1B 1 rare in California and elsewhere seriously threatened of the CNPS Inventory Red Rock Canyon monkeyflower Erythranthe rhodopetra Red Rock Canyon monkeyflower Erythranthe rhodopetra Red Rock Canyon monkeyflower is endemic to the El Paso Mountains in Kern County California It was named after the red sedimentary rocks of Red Rock Canyon State Park where the species grows in sandy canyon washes of Mojavean desert scrub at the base of red sedimentary cliffs Red Rock Canyon monkeyflower is only known from seven occurrences and is possibly threatened by mining vehicles recreational activities foot traffic and non native plants Based on its very small distribution and occurrence number and threats it was added to CRPR 1B 1 rare in California and elsewhere seriously threatened of the CNPS Inventory Sierra Nevada monkeyflower Erythranthe sierrae Sierra Nevada monkeyflower is endemic to the southwestern foothills of Sierra Nevada in California from Fresno Tulare and Kern counties It is primarily known from decomposed granite in vernally wet swales depressions the edges of streams dry meadows and in openings of oak woodland and pine forest Sierra Nevada monkeyflower Erythranthe sierrae Sierra Nevada monkeyflower is known from over thirty occurrences and is possibly threatened by development grazing off highway vehicles recreational activities road and trail maintenance and non native plants It is currently being proposed for addition to CRPR 4 2 watch list moderately threatened of the CNPS Inventory due to its limited distribution and possible threats Note All but one monkeyflower Mimulus ringens in California are no longer included in the genus Mimulus and are now comprised in two genera Diplacus and Erythranthe There are currently 33 Mimulus taxa in the CNPS Inventory that will reviewed for change to the genus Diplacus or Erythranthe due to new taxonomy Please keep your eyes out for these many changes to come Desert Conservation Planning Proposed conservation measures for desert vegetation under the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan DRECP or Plan continue to be developed by state and federal agencies CNPS Conservation Program will be reviewing and commenting on these documents as they become available The DRECP is a combined Natural Communities Conservation Plan NCCP Habitat Conservation Plan HCP covering 23 million acres of California s desert landscape and is still very much in flux The planning area affects seven southern counties Inyo Kern San Bernardino Los Angeles Riverside Imperial and San Diego though participating in the Plan is voluntary for both counties and energy project applicants Ideally benefits of participating in the Plan include expedited project review and approval processes for both project proponents and lead agencies and well planned conservation benefits for the desert In general the seven counties are wary of agreeing to a Plan that mitigates impacts of renewable energy projects by converting millions of acres of private county lands into a large conservation reserve since eliminating development rights on these lands would limit future county tax revenues Without county participation however the conservation measures developed under the NCCP would become all but meaningless since there would be no regulatory nexus to implement them To illustrate an example Kern County would be the lead California Environmental Quality Act CEQA agency for most energy related projects built on private lands in Kern County Through the DRECP mitigation for that project would follow recommendations in the Plan However if Kern County is not a DRECP participant there is no incentive for either the county or the project applicant to follow recommendations and requirements spelled out in the DRECP The assessment and mitigation for plant impacts would default to the status quo practices for each county s planning department which represents a very low bar compared to the NCCP related measures emerging from the DRECP One potential solution to the county issue is for the DRECP to plan much of the mitigation and conservation on public lands specifically on Bureau of Land Management BLM managed lands This presents a separate set of problems related to ensuring durable conservation on public lands since measures and assurances written in place today could be reversed by an administrative order from Washington D C at anytime in the future Therefore the question of how our federal government can and will ensure durability of new and additional conservation on public lands has become a key issue in on going DRECP policy discussions Parallel to the tangle of policy related DRECP discussions is the non stop work to develop a science based conservation plan At this stage in the DRECP the CNPS Conservation Program is focused on gathering as much expert opinion as possible on the proposed plant conservation measures as they become available for review A draft NCCP HCP EIR EIS is scheduled for release in the fall of 2013 when most of the conservation recommendations will be available for public review for the first time In April 2013 the CNPS Conservation Program was awarded a 20 000 grant from the Giles W and Elise G Mead Foundation to coordinate the collection of comments and recommendations from CNPS desert experts and advocate their inclusion into the DRECP Thus far the DRECP process has been far from perfect and large scale desert energy projects remain controversial Nevertheless CNPS has an opportunity to be the voice for desert plant species and communities that will be affected by our nation s energy transformation and we continue to keep this as a top priority of the Conservation Program Establishing a State

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201307.php (2016-04-26)
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