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  • October 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    in granitic and rocky areas of many habitats throughout the South Coast and Peninsular Ranges of southern California Continue reading here Inventory Tip Did you know that you can search for plants based on blooming time in the new Online Inventory 8th Edition Not many plants in California are known to bloom in fall and winter months especially in comparison to spring however you may be surprised to find out how many plants particularly rare plants actually do Moreover knowing the frequent blooming periods of rare plants is essential in performing adequately timed and effective surveys Continue reading here Conservation Updates from the East Bay Chapter This fall the East Bay Chapter has been hard at work on several priority conservation projects For more information about the projects below and other EBCNPS conservation projects please visit our conservation blog site at http ebcnps wordpress com Opposition to Alameda County Measure A1 Since August the East Bay Chapter has been working to educate the public in Alameda County about an imminent threat to Knowland Park Knowland Park is Oakland s largest wildland park and is part of our chapter s Foothills of South Oakland Botanical Priority Protection Area due to its rare plant communities and high quality native habitat The future of Knowland is now threatened by Measure A1 a misleading ballot measure on the Alameda County Ballot A1 is a proposed parcel tax that would be paid directly to the Oakland Zoo for the next 25 years The tax is estimated to generate over 120 million for the Zoo during its lifetime This parcel tax is being presented by the Oakland Zoo as a humane animal care measure but we fear that its stealth purpose is to fund a massive Zoo expansion into ecologically rich wildlife and native plant habitat in Knowland Park The fine print in the measure s wording would allow funds from Measure A1 to be used for the Zoo s proposed 72 million expansion development into public park land in Knowland Park A1 funds could also be used to pay for any future expansions into the park that the Zoo may chose to undertake expansions that the zoo has refused to rule out The oak grassland interface at Knowland Park This area will be fenced off and developed upon as part of the Oakland Zoo s proposed expansion development Now the Zoo is trying to pass a parcel tax that will allow it to use taxpayer funds for this environmental destruction Photo Mack Casterman The Zoo s current expansion plans call for a 34 000 square foot restaurant gift shop visitor center and office complex that will impact a rare chaparral plant community used by many species of native wildlife including mountain lions and the threatened Alameda whipsnake The proposed expansion development would also result in the destruction of acres of high quality native grassland Zoo executives refuse to consider environmentally superior locations In order to maintain the Chapter s non profit status we formed a political action committee with our ally organization The Friends of Knowland Park We have been careful to fully comply with state Fair Political Practices while working to educate voters including writing the opposition argument for the measure in the County s Voter guide As November approaches EBCNPS s work to oppose Alameda County Measure A1 The Oakland Zoo Parcel Tax is peaking We have been attending meetings with voter groups working on media outreach and posting regular updates on the saveknowland org website This political battle has been hard and the outcome is far from certain but our grassroots effort has made great strides given our limited resources At a recent League of Women Voters Forum Oakland Zoo CEO Joel Parrott admitted that the Zoo is spending 1 million on its campaign to pass this measure casting doubt on the Zoo s claims that it needs parcel tax funds because it is cash strapped We are pleased that this ballot measure has given us the opportunity to get the word out about Knowland Park and its valuable natural resources to tens of thousands of individuals who otherwise would not have heard of it We are hopeful that Alameda County voters will get our message and vote to help save Knowland Park this November Measure A1 is Opposed by East Bay Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Friends of Knowland Park Alameda Creek Alliance California Native Grasslands Association Resource Renewal Institute Ohlone Audubon Society Oakland Rising The East Bay Express and many other individuals and organizations that care about protecting our precious parklands For more information about our campaign visit www saveknowland org Roddy ranch On October 3 2012 EBCNPS submitted comments for the Recirculated Draft Environmental Impact Report for the proposed Roddy Ranch Project in Antioch This project involves development of 540 acres of land for residential homes in the southern area of Antioch The development area is part of our Four Valleys Botanical Priority Protection Area and is thus of major concern to our chapter This area is recognized by CNPS for priority protection because it represents a transition zone between the eastern flanks of the northern Diablo Range the San Joaquin Valley and the Los Medanos Hills The area contains both sandy and alkaline soils which support a wide variety of rare and unusual plant species that are worthy of protection The Recirculated DEIR predicts significant environmental impacts including impacts to rare plants and unique native plant communities due to this project even after proposed mitigation efforts are completed Because of these glaring issues in the plan we are hopeful that the DEIR will be re evaluated and amended by the project applicants A copy of our comment letter and its attachments can be found at http ebcnps wordpress com by searching Roddy Ranch CEQA Challenges It seems that attacking the 41 year old California Environmental Quality Act is an annual sport in Sacramento First a giant football stadium was given immunity from CEQA enforcement Then in

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201210.php (2016-04-26)
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  • September 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    You your dog or your cat may each become unwitting accomplices in this illicit activity A late summer or autumn hike through an open meadow dense riparian growth or even thick chaparral will reveal these travelers looking for an easy ride Fur filled with burrs pant legs covered in clinging seeds socks painfully filled with foxtails Fall is the time of harvest but it is also the time for seeds often enclosed within fruits to search for a new destination to flourish and spread their genetic vigor The development of both seeds and fruits is triggered by flower fertilization The nucleus of the fertilized egg or zygote divides and develops into the specialized components of a seed nutrient tissue a filament an embryonic new plant cotyledons and tiny roots and shoots Fertilization also triggers hormones which cause the ovary wall to thicken and become fruit Continue reading here CNPS Horticulture Events Calendar Fall has arrived is your local chapter hosting a plant sale garden tour presentation or workshop this weekend The new CNPS Horticulture Events calendar is searchable by CNPS chapter and type of event The calendar is updated frequently so be sure to check back for events in your area CNPS Nature Journaling Workshop Nature Journaling with John Muir Laws Nov 8 9 Coyote Hills Regional Park Fremont Learn to improve observation skills ask relevant scientific questions and explore the natural world through nature journaling Two days of sketching art instruction and nature study could jump start you into keeping your own nature travel journal or re inspire you to pick up your sketchbook again We will examine different ways of keeping journals and develop habits to keep you actively sketching Learn how to paint a five minute mini landscape and an animal on the move using graphite colored pencil and watercolor all of which are well suited for easy sketching outdoors Bring your favorite sketching supplies Coyote Hills is a wonderful place for observing birds and plants even in November Cost CNPS Members 295 Non members 320 To register or to read the full workshop announcement click here Chapter Events Yerba Buena Chapter Program Planting Natives for Bees Birds and Butterflies Thursday October 4 6 30 PM Pollinators are very important components of native ecosystems and are becoming less common due to urbanization But you can help by planting the right native plants to attract bees birds and butterflies Join expert Don Mahoney Curator of Collections and Horticulture Manager at San Francisco Botanical Garden SFBG as he emphasizes the best native plants for our local pollinators Recreation Room Francisco County Fair Building 9th Avenue Lincoln Way in Golden Gate Park The building is served by the 71 and 44 lines is one block from the N Judah car and is two blocks from the 6 43 and 66 bus lines Santa Cruz Chapter Field Trip Neary Lagoon Saturday October 6 10 AM Noon A remnant wetland hidden away right in the middle of Santa Cruz This was once

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201209.php (2016-04-26)
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  • August 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    may also support the hypothesis of light competition since mosses and sundew are similar in size and stature and typically do not shade each other Continue reading here Cypress A Rare Natural Community For the past year the CNPS Vegetation Program has been working with volunteers to produce a fine scale map of cypress stands throughout the state Why the interest and focus on cypress There are 11 species of cypress Hesperocyparis spp that occur in California seven of which have been assigned a California Rare Plant Rank of 1B rare threatened or endangered in California and elsewhere These include Santa Cruz cypress H abramsiana Tecate cypress H forbesii Gowen cypress H goveniana Monterey cypress H macrocarpa Piute cypress H nevadensis pygmy cypress H pygmaea and Cuyamaca cypress H stephensonii Baker cypress H bakeri is currently on a watch list because it is broadly but infrequently distributed throughout the state Continue reading here What Does a CNPS Chapter Vegetation Chair Do This month we are highlighting the important work of chapter volunteers who take on the role of local vegetation chair Each CNPS chapter has a vegetation coordinator position that works with their chapter members to develop vegetation sampling goals These goals vary but often focus on a rare or threatened vegetation type in their local area Nicole Jurjavcic and Megan Keever began as co chairs of the vegetation committee for the East Bay Chapter of CNPS EBCNPS in the summer of 2011 These positions offered them the chance to gain a greater familiarity with the flora of the East Bay and to engage with members at the local chapter level As botanists working for Stillwater Sciences Nicole and Megan spend their work days conducting special status plant surveys vegetation mapping plant monitoring and creating re vegetation plans for restoration sites throughout California and the Pacific Northwest As CNPS volunteers they spend time hiking local trails and getting to know vegetation types near their homes while contributing to the collective knowledge about vegetation in their local community Continue reading here Help CNPS Win a Chase Community Giving Grant The California Native Plant Society CNPS is competing with charities nationwide for grants ranging from 10 000 to 250 000 from Chase Community Giving CNPS members and fans can help ensure our success by simply voting for CNPS through the Chase Community Giving program on Facebook and the Chase Community Giving website from September 6 19 2012 The link to vote will be provided on our Facebook page beginning September 6 Chase customers are automatically awarded two extra votes and can use their Customer Appreciation Votes to vote for the California Native Plant Society directly at chase com ChaseGiving between September 6 19 CNPS 2012 Conservation Symposium Saturday September 8 Santa Cruz CA CNPS will present its annual Conservation Symposium a day long series of talks and discussions addressing a focus topic held each September during our fall Chapter Council meeting This year speakers will present a retrospective of how plant species

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201208.php (2016-04-26)
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  • July 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    natural resource management Projects will be designed to parallel flowering cycles beginning in the spring through fall of 2012 It is not too late to plan a short project for late summer or fall Email Josie Crawford for more information Guided experimental design field research and technical research reports will be components of the project Available funding covers travel expenses and supplies Learn more about the Native Plant Pollinator Project CNPS 2012 Conservation Symposium Saturday September 8 Santa Cruz CA CNPS will present its annual Conservation Symposium a day long series of talks and discussions addressing a focus topic held each September during our fall Chapter Council meeting This year speakers will present a retrospective including case studies of how plant species and plant communities have been addressed in Natural Community Conservation Plans NCCPs over the past 20 years Presentations will include recommendations for improving plant community conservation in future NCCPs and tips for plant advocates interested in engaging in NCCP processes in their Chapters For further details to be posted soon click here Upcoming Rare Plant Treasure Hunts For more information about the Rare Plant Treasure Hunt project go to http www cnps org cnps rareplants treasurehunt Moonwort Hunt at Loon Lake El Dorado National Forest August 4 5 10AM 4PM Last year Rare Plant Treasure Hunters camped at Loon Lake to search for rare moonworts Botrychium spp in the El Dorado National Forest We were able to find paradox moonwort Botrychium paradoxum which is only known from 3 different sites in the state This year we ll revisit the paradox moonwort to see if any individuals have emerged this year and then search some of the meadows and drainages that might support other populations of rare Botrychiums Meet at the intersection of Hwy 50 and Ice House Rd at 10AM on Saturday August 4th There is a parking area on the south river side of Hwy 50 where we will congregate From there we ll drive to higher elevation sites to search for the moonworts We have a campsite reserved at Loon Lake Campground for those who would like to stay for a whole weekend of moonwort hunting Email Danny Slakey to RSVP for this trip and state whether you d prefer to camp and stay for the entire weekend or just join for a day Osa Meadow Kern Plateau Tulare County August 11 8AM 5PM Return to Osa Meadow Kern Plateau led by Kathy LaShure Last summer we could not access our planned Kern Plateau location and visited Osa Meadow instead It was fabulosa So much so that we re going back this year The meadow has not been grazed by cattle for a number of years and has rebounded floristically Three rare species were sighted in 2011 and there are at least 6 other possible CNPS Rank 1 or 2 rare plants that we can search for this year High clearance vehicle required Be prepared for sun wind hot and cold Bring food and drink and have your fuel tanks full The Black Rock Information Station and the Kennedy Meadows Store have no fuel This will be a full day outing We will meet at the Inyokern Post Office at 8 00 am to carpool Those coming from points north can meet the group at 8 30 am at the 9 Mile Canyon Rd turnoff from Hwy 395 Contact person Email Kathy LaShure or call 760 377 4541 Mt Baldy Moonwort Hunt San Bernardino County map Aug 11 8 AM 2PM Full waiting list only Join the San Gabriel Mountains CNPS Chapter the USFS and other rare plant treasure hunters for a trip to the Mount Baldy region in the San Bernardino National Forest in search of the elusive and rare moonworts Botrychiums These strange ferns are found scattered throughout North America but they are always elusive existing for most of the year in a dormant underground state sometimes not emerging above ground for over a year In California all but one moonwort species is quite rare This trip will take us to the northeast side of Baldy Notch where the earliest documentation of moonworts occurred 90 years ago We ll search the mountain meadow for these small ferns and see what we find in the way of lemon lilies Lilium parryi along the way Due to the delicate habitat there is a limit of 9 participants to prevent impact to the meadow and tiny plant specimens First reserved accommodated We ll be consolidating into two vehicles and going through a locked gate together near the top of the ski lifts You must sign up for this trip individually Detailed directions and meet place will be sent to the final participant list Little Dry Creek Unit Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area RPTH August 18 Hunt for California Hibisicus Hibiscus lasiocarpos var occidentalis More details will be forthcoming Conact Ron Coley for more details or to RSVP Butte Creek House RPTH Oct 6 10AM 4PM Hunt for Obtuse starwort with the Mt Lassen Chapter of CNPS More details about this trip will be forthcoming Conact Ron Coley for more details Chapter Events Mount Lassen Chapter Humbug Summit Check Listing Butte County Friday August 3 This is another of the slightly new type of field trips with less hiking and more identifying Botanically interested folks of all skill levels are invited This is a chance to improve your plant keying skills in an area with good diversity of primarily native species Roadside meadows dry and wet and forests will be visited culminating with the area of Humbug Summit at 6714 feet the highest spot in Butte County reached by a good dirt road Our goal will be to produce a list of all plant species identifiable on this date Bring water lunch insect sun protection and money for ride sharing Meet at west lot of Chico Park Ride Hwy 32 99 to leave at 9 am return probably 5 pm For further details as the roadside stops are

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201207.php (2016-04-26)
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  • June 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    the previous article please click here The long languorous days of summer offer an opportunity like no other time of the year The many day lit hours present the possibility of intense growth and busy activity while warm sultry temperatures slow us down and beg us to take a siesta We shed layers of clothes and amplify under the warming glow of the California sunshine During summer humans are capable of both concentrated production and aimless wandering We work and play Our gardens bolt and need tending but paradoxically we stand back and let the plants do their thing A juxtaposition of vibrating energy and slow relaxation Similarly seeds having sprouted only a few months earlier take full advantage of this season Roots spread wide and deep and stems reach out and upward Both ends of the plant wander to find new sustenance Fresh leaves unfurl and drink in sunlit energy converting it into oxygen and energy This energy then transforms into the production of flowers flowers that eventually wilt in order to transfer their energy toward the development of seeds Seeds carrying genetic information acquired over millennia are ready to manifest into the blossoming of summer flowers once more Continue reading here Growing Clarkias Clarkia bottae Photo by Ron Vanderhoff By Liz Parsons Clarkias are annual plants that are easy to grow in our gardens This is good because their charismatic flowers can become an obsession Clarkias bloom at the end of the wildflower season hence their common name Farewell to Spring In most wildflower mixes Clarkias are included and they extend the blooming period of the mix into June At the flower market Clarkias are sold as Godetias and this refers to an older name of the genus which was abandoned long ago but is still used in the flower trade The flower is really Clarkia amoena ssp whitneyi a spectacularly large flower that is in the color range red pink white Continue reading here CNPS Educational Grants Calling all university students The deadline to apply for a 2012 Educational Grant is September 30 2012 Please go to http www cnps org cnps education grants php and scroll down to CNPS Educational Grants Program for guidelines and details about applying for a research grant CNPS Plant Training Workshop For full workshop announcements and registration please go to http www cnps org cnps education workshops July 10 12 2012 Vegetation Rapid Assessment Relevé Workshop with Todd Keeler Wolf and Jennifer Buck Diaz UC Santa Barbara s Sedgwick Reserve Santa Ynez Santa Barbara County This course combines an introductory evening lecture and two field days with exercises in fine scale vegetation sampling Course description The course will be a combination of lecture and field exercises in vegetation sampling with a focus on collecting data using the CNPS DFG combined vegetation rapid assessment relevà method We will discuss applications of fine scale vegetation sampling classification and mapping how to document rare natural communities and how vegetation information fits into planning documents

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201206.php (2016-04-26)
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  • May 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    order to ensure that this special area is spoken for during the upcoming General Plan process EBCNPS has signed on as supporters for a group called The Friends of Tesla Park We will be assisting them by providing botanical information and commenting on the process as this plan moves forward Currently East Bay Conservation Analyst Mack Casterman is working on putting together a letter on behalf of EBCNPS for the scoping process of this project Our letter will detail the botanical value of this land in the hope that alternatives to this potentially damaging expansion project will be considered New CNPS Online Inventory 8th Edition Tip Aaron E Sims Did you know that you can now search for plants that have been Considered But Rejected CBR in the new CNPS Online Inventory 8th Edition Plants that have been Considered But Rejected in the Inventory include those that were previously included in the Inventory but have been deleted as well as plants that were reviewed for addition to the Inventory but were rejected for inclusion due to a variety of reasons e g being too common Reviewing the CBR list allows users to know which plants the CNPS Rare Plant Program has evaluated in the past and includes a basic reason as to why the plants have been rejected The CBR list currently contains 742 plants and continues to grow as the Rare Plant Program evaluates more and more potential changes and proposed additions to the Inventory The full list of CBR plants can be searched for in the Simple Search page of the new Online Inventory Once you are there check the box next to Considered But Rejected under the California Rare Plant Rank search criteria and hit Search You now have access to a full list of CBR plants which you can then export to excel or you can click on individual plant names to find out the reason it was rejected for inclusion in the Inventory Click here to see an example of this search ReLeaf Urban Forestry Education Grants Available Funding is available now to assist nonprofit and community based groups throughout California with tree planting and tree care projects Eligible applicants include incorporated nonprofit organizations and unincorporated community based groups with a financial sponsor located in California Individual funding requests range from 1 000 to 10 000 Deadline is July 20 Visit California ReLeaf s Grants page to download PDF copies of the guidelines application and other materials To request a hard copy please email cmills californiareleaf org or call 916 497 0035 CNPS Plant Training Workshops For full workshop announcements and registration please go to http www cnps org cnps education workshops CNPS offers a limited number of reduced or waived registration fees for each Plant Science Training workshop See this link if you are interested in learning more about the CNPS Work Exchange Program June 19 21 2012 Mountain Riparian Plants Taught by Stew Winchester South and Middle Forks of the Yuba River from

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201205.php (2016-04-26)
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  • April 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    habitats Future actions will involve collaboration with partners to conserve and restore a representation of California grasslands and provide education about the values of grassland habitats If you want more information about grasslands in California visit our website here or contact Jennifer Buck Diaz What is a Fen Kendra Sikes Vegetation Ecologist Fens a rare habitat type in California have been a focus of study for the CNPS Vegetation Program in collaboration with the US Forest Service and others Fens are a type of peatland Peat is partially decomposed plant matter like the dried peat found at garden centers and it forms in wetlands that remain saturated with water for most of the year A peatland has a stable environment where peat has continued to form over time until this organic material lacking the mineral component of most soil is the primary substrate for plants to grow in Most people are more familiar with the term bog which are peatlands found in climates of high rainfall In California the peatlands are formed where groundwater not rainfall is the primary source of water saturation and therefore they are technically fens One of the best known peat forming plants is sphagnum moss Sphagnum spp It grows in acidic peatlands including some fens in California CNPS has collected three different species of sphagnums and more than 25 other moss species while working in fens However lots of vascular plants grow in fens too especially sedges Carex spp and rushes Juncus spp Even some woody plants like lodgepole pine Pinus contorta ssp muricata Labrador tea Rhododendron columbianum and willows Salix spp can grow in fens The nutrient poor environment of some fens is also habitat for interesting carnivorous plants such as sundew Drosera rotundifolia and California pitcher plant Darlingtonia californica A variety of other plants animals and plant associations occur in fens and some of these are described in recent vegetation reports where we have sampled fen vegetation including for the Lake Tahoe Basin Shasta Trinity National Forest Sequoia National Forest and other locations Upcoming CNPS Workshops For full announcements workshop descriptions and registration please go to http www cnps org cnps education workshops May 15 17 2012 Measuring and Monitoring Plant Populations John Willoughby Coal Oil Point Reserve UC Santa Barbara Using classroom and field exercises the workshop will focus on the role of plant population monitoring for adaptive management Topics cover principles of sampling and several sampling designs field techniques for measuring vegetation analyzing monitoring data and presenting results Three full days COST CNPS members 395 Non members 420 Registration and full description available here May 23 24 2012 Rare Plant Survey Protocols A Scientific Approach Taught by Heath Bartosh Aaron Sims with a lecture by Roxanne Bittman Mount Diablo and environs Contra Costa County This classroom and field course is designed to approach rare plant surveys using the best scientific information available This scientific approach is built on conducting proper background review and literature searches evaluating ecological information assessing annual phenology

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201204.php (2016-04-26)
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  • March 2012 eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    Walla Murphy This article is part one of a four part series about the physiology and life cycle of seeds As vernal equinox approaches and spring begins to take hold hillsides meadows grasslands and even gardens transform Tender bright green shoots overtake the brown dormancy of winter New growth reaches for the sun as the days lengthen and temperatures rise Winter and spring storms converge over California and drop precious and necessary moisture And yet while our eye is drawn to the green above ground our attention should be directed below toward the seeds responsible for the freshness of spring Unfortunately seeds are often taken for granted They arrive unceremoniously in prepackaged pouches or are laboriously picked off of clothing after a long day s hike But really they are a tiny efficient bundle of immense potential energy Article continued here Spring CNPS Chapter Plant Sales Spring plant sale season is here Check the CNPS plant sale calendar to see when your local chapter is hosting a plant sale All plant sales are open to the public though most chapters offer special benefits to CNPS members such as early admission and discounts If you are not currently a member or if you have let your membership lapse you can join online today and bring your confirmation email to a plant sale this weekend Don t want to join online You can sign up on the spot at any chapter plant sale CNPS members also receive discounts at a number of nurseries stores and other businesses to help you with your garden maintenance year around Chapter Events Shasta Chapter Saturday March 31 9 AM Vernal Pool Field trip Join Don Burk on a poke along through some local vernal pools Destination to be determined depending on what is blooming in the Redding Red Bluff areas Most likely we will caravan to several different vernal pools all of which will be off trail so expect uneven terrain and with any luck wet feet Meet at 9 AM at the Redding City Hall south parking lot on Parkview Avenue No dogs please Please call Don at 347 0849 for further information Saturday April 14 TBA Yana Trail Hike Join Jay Terri Thesken for an 8 to 9 mile hike to the Yana Trail area of the Sacramento River Bend Recreation Area north of Red Bluff The bluffs adjacent to the Sacramento River are typically covered with wildflowers at this time of year This will be a long all day hike that requires good hiking boots water and lunch No dogs please Space will be limited so call Jay Terri at 221 0906 for time directions and further information Santa Clara Valley Chapter Saturday March 31 10 AM Uvas Canyon County Park Hike Morgan Hill Andy Butcher and others will lead a 3 25 mile loop hike in this mostly shady woodland of mixed evergreens including redwoods madrones sycamores alders and big leaf maples There are also isolated populations of Oregon grape Berberis nervosa

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201203.php (2016-04-26)
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