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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    classification of grassland types We plan to describe and validate new herbaceous vegetation Ultimately we will be expanding the definition of grasslands to include native forbs as important and sometimes dominant plants Over the next two years funding from NRCS and CNPS will support new surveys on private ranchlands in the Central Valley to examine how plants vary over time especially annual herbs by allowing us to revisit and re sample field sites In particular we intend to identify plants that are characteristically present and persistent in categorizing different grassland types as well as to identify locations where invasive plants could be specifically managed Overall this project will allow us to better describe classify and manage grasslands Future actions will involve collaborating with partners to identify conserve and restore a representation of California grasslands and providing education about the values of grassland habitats If you want more information about grasslands in California visit our website here or contact Jennifer Buck Diaz by email A Manual of California Second Edition Database Project Upon publishing the new edition of the Manual of California Vegetation last fall the book is being widely used by agency staff consulting biologists planners and natural history lovers to better understand represent conserve and manage the diversity of vegetation types found in our state CNPS is now inputting all of the information into a digital database Our next step will be to establish a new online version of the Manual so that people can digitally access the information We have some base funds for the project and we are now seeking contributions from agencies organizations and individuals like you Having a database and online version will allow everyone to access and utilize the information and apply the information locally We also intend to publish photographs of our state s diverse vegetation online and through a new picture book to compliment the manual s voluminous text To purchase a copy of the Manual click here If you or your organization is able to currently help support this project please contact our Executive Director Tara Hansen Funding Opportunity for Grassland Research Prairie Biotic Reseach Inc is an all volunteer Wisconsin nonprofit established in 2000 to foster basic biotic research in prairies and savannas They have a competitive Small Grants Program that funds up to 1000 to individuals for the study of any grassland taxon anywhere in the USA They support both natural history and experimental science Since 2002 they ve awarded 100 grants worth 94 849 to people in 24 states to study insects plants mammals reptiles slime molds mycorrhizal fungi spiders snails amphibians i nvasive species and effects of management TO APPLY Visit prairiebioticresearch org to download the proposal form instructions and a sample researcher agreement form that winners of this competition must sign The deadline for applications is January 7 2011 Fall Workshops For full details and registration for all workshops go to http cnps org cnps education workshops index php Reduced or fee waivers are available for

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201010.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    guidelines fire resistant structures and irrigated defensible space may need to be part of the design Here are some non plant elements to consider Article continued here CNPS Chapter Plant Sale Calendar Is there a CNPS Chapter plant sale near you this autumn CNPS Board Member and volunteer Arvind Kumar compiled a calendar of plant sales for easy viewing Start planning your spring and summer garden by attending a fall plant sale found here Fall Workshops For full details and registration for all workshops go to http cnps org cnps education workshops index php Reduced or fee waivers are available for students and under employed people Please go to http cnps org cnps education work exchange php for more information or to apply Mojave Desert Rare Plant Treasure Hunt and Training Oct 9 2010 Instructors Amber Swanson and Joshua Tree National Park Staff Joshua Tree National Park CNPS and Joshua Tree National Park staff will offer free training to people who are interested in leading teams to search for rare plants The next scheduled training will be offered in the Mojave Desert on Saturday Oct 9th from 9 30 am to 5 pm at Joshua Tree National Park Go to the Rare Plant Treasure Hunt webpage or check out the latest from our Mojave coordinator Amber Swanson in her Treasure Hunt blog If you are interested in participating in the Treasure Hunt or you have questions email us at treasurehunt cnps org Negotiation Skills for Environmental Problem Solving Nov 17 19 2010 Instructor Jim Nelson with special guests Sacramento area Three days of classroom exercises and case studies Environmental negotiations are often more complex than other negotiations due to their technical complexity regulatory complexity interest from many parties and often the emotional nature of the parties This workshop presents basic negotiation concepts e g Fisher and Ury s Getting to Yes series and specific environmental issue applications Negotiation simulations and role playing are used to provide a fun and safe way to learn negotiation principles In addition everyone is encouraged prepare for upcoming real life negotiations during this course This course emphasizes using principled negotiation approaches The attendees are taught to recognize commonly encountered tactics and shown produc tive responses Guest presenters will provide examples of successful negotiations The skills taught in this class help many reduce anxiety about negotiating while helping to achieve successful outcomes Course materials provide useful tools for future negotiations CNPS Members 395 Non Members 420 Plant Taxonomy Teacher Training Nov 20 21 2010 Instructor Dr Glenn Keator Regional Parks Botanic Garden Tilden Park Berkeley This course is for people interested in teaching a plant taxonomy course at the junior college or extended education level Potential teachers should be familiar with California flora and its plant families and have taken one or more semesters of Plant Taxonomy or Systematics We will not be teaching plant taxonomy in this course but will teach how to teach a course using the syllabus provided by Dr Glenn Keator Cost

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201009.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    Mid Autumn 2011 Fall Workshops For full details and registration for all workshops go to http cnps org cnps education workshops index php Reduced or fee waivers are available for students and under employed people Please go to http cnps org cnps education work exchange php for more information or to apply Mojave Desert Rare Plant Treasure Hunt and Training Oct 9 2010 Instructors Amber Swanson and Joshua Tree National Park Staff Joshua Tree National Park CNPS and Joshua Tree National Park staff will offer free training to people who are interested in leading teams to search for rare plants The next scheduled training will be offered in the Mojave Desert on Saturday Oct 9th from 9 30 am to 5 pm at Joshua Tree National Park Go to the Rare Plant Treasure Hunt webpage or check out the latest from our Mojave coordinator Amber Swanson in her Treasure Hunt blog If you are interested in participating in the Treasure Hunt or you have questions email us at treasurehunt cnps org Legends of the Fall Exploring the clandestine flora of early fall in the eastern Mojave Desert Sept 28 30 2010 Instructors Jim Andre and Tasha La Doux UC Granite Mountains Desert Research Center First evening presentation followed by two field days Few botanists journey out in the late summer or early fall in search of colorful blooms of California s desert plants Yet the early fall bloom in the eastern Mojave Desert can be more reliable than the more popular spring blooms Approximately 10 of eastern Mojave annuals are considered summer annuals species that germinate following the monsoonal cloudbursts of summer grow rapidly and complete the life cycle before temperatures decline sharply in fall In addition many perennial species flower in early fall particularly those of the Asteraceae Poaceae and Polygonaceae This course will introduce botanists to the ecology and taxonomy of the diverse flora of early fall in the eastern Mojave Desert with special emphasis on rare or un ique species Cost of workshop includes meals and dorm lodging for two days and two nights CNPS Members 435 Non Members 460 Negotiation Skills for Environmental Problem Solving Nov 17 19 2010 Instructor Jim Nelson with special guests UC Davis Three days of classroom exercises and case studies Environmental negotiations are often more complex than other negotiations due to their technical complexity regulatory complexity interest from many parties and often the emotional nature of the parties This workshop presents basic negotiation concepts e g Fisher and Ury s Getting to Yes series and specific environmental issue applications Negotiation simulations and role playing are used to provide a fun and safe way to learn negotiation principles In addition everyone is encouraged prepare for upcoming real life negotiations during this course This course emphasizes using principled negotiation approaches The attendees are taught to recognize commonly encountered tactics and shown produc tive responses Guest presenters will provide examples of successful negotiations The skills taught in this class help many reduce anxiety about

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201008.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    of April will go a long way toward encouraging the protection and propagation of our native plants Desert Conservation Plan Update Greg Suba Federal and state agencies managing land and resources in California are preparing a landscape level conservation plan in order to expedite the siting and development of renewable energy facilities across California s desert ecoregion The purpose of the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan or DRECP is to protect desert wildlife and wild lands while expediting desert renewable energy production Implicit to the success of the DRECP is the preservation of the ecological needs of desert plant species and vegetation communities To assist the DRECP process CNPS is gathering and prioritizing information relevant to the conservation of intact natural vegetation communities and rare plant populations within the desert planning area and will work to ensure this information is incorporated into the DRECP process This is information that would otherwise be under considered overlooked or ignored due to the lack of agency staff available to fully consider plant issues given the unprecedented pace and scale of the DRECP process There is also a tendency to respond toward the more broadly defined missions of other wildlife and wild lands conservation organizations yet it is the plants themselves that that provide the underlying habitat values necessary to support desert wildlife We will gather analyze an d prioritize botanical information critical to the preservation of intact natural vegetation communities and rare plant populations provide this informat ion to land use agencies conservation organizations and renewable energy developers and advocate to DRECP stakeholders for the adoption of the most appropriate plant conservation measures based on our findings The DRECP Stakeholders meet monthly in either Sacramento or Southern California A desert renewable energy DRAFT Interim Mitigation Strategy was presented during the July meeting and the DRECP Independent Science Advisory Panel s Science Recommendation Report will be presented at the upcoming August 11 meeting in Ontario CA DRECP documents and meeting notices can be found on the web here and more information about the process can be found on the CNPS website here For over a year CNPS and others have advocated for more reliance on distributed renewable energy generation e g rooftop solar to complement properly sited large generation facilities More rooftop solar generation would ease the pressure to build massive desert facilities and reduce impacts to desert flora and fauna How can we promote the building of more rooftop solar projects A key factor in implementing more distributed generation is growing the market for this technology Establishing competitive feed in tariffs for distributed energy generation could be the way to get there A feed in tariff or FiT is a pre determined amount of money a person receives for selling energy from distributed e g rooftop sources You can learn more about Fits from the Fit Coalition s website Education News Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Offers Team Leader Trainings Beginning this month CNPS staff will offer trainings to people interested in leading teams

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201007.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    one of the most common calls her business receives starts with I have this slope behind my house Plants for slopes must perform many functions control erosion hold the slope be drought tolerant and since slopes are often in fire risk areas be firewise Happily there are many plants in the native palette which meet these needs Article continued at http cnps org cnps grownative tips sunny slopes php Fragrant Natives for the Garden Arvind Kumar One of the nicest comments my garden has received in the eight years of being shown on the Going Native Garden Tour came this year in the form of a question I was giving a guided tour of the garden to a group of visitors We were standing on the flagstone path in the sunny front yard when a visitor asked Does your garden always smell this good It was a question and a statement The answer to the question is yes many native plants are fragrant year round but the quality of fragrance depends on the season and sometimes on the time of day Some summer nights when I come home late from work the garden greets me with an enchanting aroma that says Stay Linger Inhale As an owner one tends to take things for granted but that spring morning the first time visitor s remark made me aware of it once again What she was experiencing was not a particular flower or plant but a heady brew of fragrances from several different plants Here is a short list of native plants to stimulate your olfactory senses and soothe your mind The large leaves of hummingbird sage Salvia spathacea have a pleasing minty fragrance that is accentuated when the plant is massed in a bed The plant appreciates some shade and water to keep looking its best through summer If happy it slowly expands via rhizomes and colonizes a bed Flower spikes attract hummingbirds Blooms in spring Article continued at http cnps org cnps grownative tips fragrant natives php ACR 173 California Native Plant Week Joshua Stark On June 3rd Assemblywoman Noreen Evans D Napa introduced ACR 173 a resolution designating the third week of April each year as California Native Plant Week ACR 173 recognizes the vital historical artistic and economic contributions California s native plants have made to our State Typically resolutions declaring specific times of recognition celebration or remembrance often point out general important reasons supporting these with specific facts and ACR 173 is no different Among the specific reasons for declaring a week to celebrate our native plants the resolution points out the positive impacts that native plant horticulture plays in California s future ACR 173 points out that California native plant gardening and landscaping have tremendous positive impacts to our watersheds to habitat recovery and to curbing catastrophic wildfires In particular the resolution recognizes that home landscaping and gardening with native plants can cut residential water use from 60 to 90 over conventional gardening And the resolution

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201006.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    DRECP conservation planning will be an ecoregion assessment map of the Mojave ecoregion developed by The Nature Conservancy This map is based on the 2006 Landfire vegetation classification map for California Identifying priority conservation areas using the Landfire map s vegetation classifications will be challenging because of the low resolution of Landfire s dataset CNPS and other groups are working to identify and provide high resolution vegetation community data to agency staff as quickly as possible to improve the quality of information available to conservation planning map technicians and desert planning strategists CNPS is advocating for both State and Federal regulatory agencies to quickly invest in completing a seamless up to date high resolution vegetation map for the Mojave ecoregion to provide the missing vegetation information needed for conservation planning before large scale desert wind and solar projects are sited and built For more background on CNPS Conservation Program actions on desert energy conservation issues please click here here Upcoming Plant Science Training Workshops Registration and details on CNPS workshops available here June 1 3 Wetlands Plants and Ecosystems Hopland Field Station Hopland Kerry Heise Geri Hulse Stephens Joel Butterworth Evening presentation followed by two field days interspersed with lab identification exercises 310 members and 335 non members Lodging available at the field station June 15 17 Treasures in an Ancient Landscape Rare Plants of the Eastern Klamath Ranges Shasta County Jim and Julie Nelson 310 CNPS members and 335 non members for first evening presentation followed by two field days For more details or to register for these and other workshops visit http cnps org cnps education workshops Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State Los Angeles Santa Monica Mountains Chapter Volunteer cleanup of native plant garden in a city park May 29 9 am 4 pm arrival and length of stay according to your schedule Temescal Canyon Park in Pacific Palisades Volunteer cleanup of badly neglected native plant garden in a city park co sponsored by L A Dept of Recreation Parks West Region Maintenance Palisades Beautiful and Pacific Palisades Garden Club Location Address Temescal Canyon Park in Pacific Palisades on east side of Temescal Canyon Rd between PCH and Sunset Blvd across from PaliHi athletic field just south of Bowdoin St Chumash mural Parking available nearby along street Additional event information Weeding vine clearing shrub trimming litter removal Family groups are welcome Bring gloves drinking water and snacks Contact Barbara Marinacci or refer to announcement on http lasmmcnps org for more information South Coast Chapter Program Meeting Transitioning Flora of the Southern California Salt Marsh Plant Community with Eric Zahn Salt Marsh Botanist Monday June 7 7 30 pm South Coast Botanic Garden Palos Verdes Penninsula Join local coastal ecologist and environmental educator Eric Zahn as we explore the variation specialization and diversity of southern California s coastal plant communities Due to their degradation and resulting rarity coastal wetlands are of particular interest to botanists like Eric His work has been focused on a distinct assemblage

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201005.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    wind project threatens damage or extirpation Solar and wind projects are slated throughout the Mojave desert in areas that have never been sampled A fast track Natural Communities Conservation Plan could be in place for the Mojave as early as June We need data now Chapters have an excellent opportunity to recruit and engage members by organizing and advertising Treasure Hunt forays in your region We will support your efforts by coordinating groups producing maps of historic rare plant occurrences and providing photos of the plants you will be looking for We can also suggest areas with high concentrations of rare plants Please contact us at treasurehunt cnps org if you would like to join us Chapters currently in the process of organizing trips include East Bay Sierra Foothills LA Santa Monica Marin Sanhedrin Sacramento Valley Santa Clara Valley Yerba Buena and San Luis Obispo If you or your chapter is interested in participating please contact coordinators Amber Swanson Mojave and Carrizo Plain and Shannon Still the rest of the state at treasurehunt cnps or g Please use the Treasure Hunt CNDDB survey form found here This can be mailed faxed or emailed directly to the CNDDB and to help us track the success of the project Follow Amber Swanson s blog about her efforts in the Mojave and Carrizo Plain http rareplanttreasurehunt blogspot com Find scheduled events on our calendar link http cnps org cnps rareplants treasurehunt calendar php or for more details about the project go to http cnps org cnps rareplants treasurehunt Upcoming Plant Science Training Workshops Registration and details on CNPS workshops available here May 18 20 Riparian Ecology and Restoration Davis and various field sites Bruce Orr Amy Merrill 395 members and 420 non members for one day of lecture followed by two days of field trips in the Sacramento Valley and Marin County June 1 3 Wetlands Plants and Ecosystems Hopland Field Station Hopland Kerry Heise Gerri Hulse Stephens Joel Butterworth Evening presentation followed by two field days interspersed with lab identification exercises 310 members and 335 non members Lodging available at the field station June 15 17 Treasures in an Ancient Landscape Rare Plants of the Eastern Klamath Ranges Shasta County Jim and Julie Nelson 310 CNPS members and 335 non members for first evening presentation followed by two field days For more details or to register for these and other workshops visit http cnps org cnps education workshops Work Exchange Program The CNPS Work Exchange Program provides workshop fee reductions or waivers for students and CNPS members who are underemployed If interested in the program you must apply online at http cnps org cnps education work exchange php A limited number of work exchange spaces are available in each workshop and applicants are awarded space on a first come first serve basis In 2010 applicants that attend a workshop on the work exchange program will also receive a free one year membership in CNPS Funds for the Work Exchange program are made available through grant awards from the June Bilisoly Legacy funds and the JiJi Foundation Botanist Certification Committee Formed The California Ecological Conservation Organization Cal ECO has formed a committee to address the need for a certification program for botanists This group is a consortium of California botanic and wildlife organizations that formed to tackle issues of interest to all member organizations The group s agenda includes developing a botanist certification program as well as developing initiatives to support students in the natural sciences botanic and wildlife academic programs and institutions Stay tuned Plant Taxonomy Curriculum by Glenn Keator If you have ever dreamed of teaching a plant taxonomy class at the local junior college extended education level but never had the time to develop the curriculum we have an opportunity for you Glenn Keator has been teaching plant taxonomy for many years at Bay Area Junior Colleges and has offered to provide his curriculum to others who are interested in teaching a plant taxonomy course in their region He has authored the book California Plant Families West of the Sierra Crest and Deserts 2009 UC Press that will serve as a text for the course Glenn is offering to provide a two day teacher s training to bring potential teachers with an initial understanding and experience of plant taxonomy up to speed to teach this sorely needed curriculum We think this course would be perfect for extended education programs since so many junior college classes are being canceled due to budget cuts This is an opportunity to earn extra money and provide an important service to people of all ages that are interested in learning more about plant taxonomy in California Contact Josie Crawford at jcrawford cnps org Chapter Events A Sampling from Around the State Willis Linn Jepson Chapter 2010 Spring Plant Sale Saturday May 1 9 am 3 pm Benicia Community Garden Perennials trees shrubs and groundcovers for a drought tolerant wildlife friendly and attractive garden Join CNPS same day and save 10 on your plant purchases Benicia Community Garden is located at the northeast corner of Military East and East Second Street in Benicia For more information or a list of plants for sale visit the Jepson chapter website www cnpsjepsonchapter org or call 707 747 5815 San Diego Chapter Field Trip to Crestridge Ecological Preserve Sunday May 2 1 pm 4 pm One of the great benefits of CNPS membership is going to wildlands and learning from experts how to identify the native plants growing there CNPS members and guests will be delighted to explore this 2600 acre California state fish and game preserve in the rocky foothills east of El Cajon The preserve protects a magnificent stand of Ceanothus cyaneus and Anthamintha ilicifolia Botanist Patricia Gordon Reedy will guide our group to several sites and Cathy Chadwick director of the preserve s caretaker group the Earth Discovery Institute will be host for the afternoon This is a CNPS member only event but if you are

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201004.php (2016-04-26)
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  • CNPS eNewsletter - California Native Plant Society
    Birds gobble insects berries and seeds hummingbirds magically move about sipping nectar or gathering cobwebs to soften their silken nests Our native bees flies dragonflies and butterflies in various activities and stages of development are fascinating using the native landscape both as home and food source And beneath our feet fungal and bacterial alliances operate silently in the soil itself How can we not be in love with such active fragrant and adventuresome landscapes and desire a similar experience in our home garden Article continued here Lose the Lawn or Just Shrink It Orchid Black Most people only walk on the lawn when they are mowing it said Mike Evans of Tree of Life Nursery in a presentation to the San Gabriel CNPS I am always in favor of killing the whole lawn and replacing it with local native plants sometimes including a small meadow of flowering perennials and sedges A well designed garden with inviting paths seating areas and water features can turn a formerly featureless and ignored lawn area into enjoyable and usable space Lawn has very little to offer in the way of habitat value so every square foot dedicated to traditional lawn can be thought of as habitat stolen from butterflies birds and all the other critters that live in Southern California Sometimes the choice is a cultural one An arty neighborhood or hillside community is more likely to accept the removal of an entire lawn than a neighborhood of cookie cutter houses with lawns to match One of my favorite quotes is People who have never voted maintain their civic duty by mowing the lawn While some of us are courageous ground breakers willing to take on their neighbors or their city others prefer ease in the neighborhood Lawn is functional if you have toddlers or dogs and prefer lawn areas for them to run around on If you are making the choice on behalf of a small child remember that uneven ground with different surfaces to walk and run on may stimulate more connections to form in the brain Flat lawn may not equal smart child Having butterflies hummingbirds lizards and other local critters in the yard teaches kids that they are part of an ecosystem A family I know had a toad come to their Glendale native garden For some families playing ball is important and that does require some type of lawn though it doesn t need to be grass Article continued here Native Here Nursery Delia Taylor Do you live in the Bay area Check out Native Here Nursery The East Bay Chapter of the California Native Plant Society manages a native plant nursery near Tilden Park that stocks plants that are native to Alameda and Contra Costa Counties If you are in the process of integrating local natives into your landscaping this is one nursery not to miss The Native Here Nursery is open 3 days a week Tuesdays noon to 3pm Fridays 9am to noon and Saturdays 10 am

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/publications/news/201003.php (2016-04-26)
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