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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    CNPS Landscaper Certification Planning Your Garden Getting Started Habitat Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Conservation Program About the Program Actions Archives Statewide Initiatives Chapter Conservation Map Past Initiatives Comment Letters Legislation Tracker Why Conserve Rare Plants Conservation Resources Positions Policies California Native Plant Week Conservation Program Native Plant Basics Below are links to advocacy materials for plant conservation What is a Native Plant Go Plants Color brochure about native plant protection issues pdf Plant Conservation Fact Sheet PDF 109k Equal Protection for Plants Did you know that plants are afforded almost no protection under the Federal Endangered Species Act Equal Protection for Plants Campaign PDF 67k California Listed

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/native_plant_basics.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Conservation Program About the Program Actions Archives Statewide Initiatives Chapter Conservation Map Past Initiatives Comment Letters Legislation Tracker Why Conserve Rare Plants Conservation Resources Positions Policies California Native Plant Week Conservation Program Endangered Species Acts ESA CESA The California Endangered Species Act CESA and the Federal Endangered Species Act FESA are among our most important tools in the fight to conserve and restore California s native biological diversity CNPS fights to strengthen and enforce these laws in the State Legislature Congress with the agencies in the courts and on the ground Issues Statement The California Endangered Species Act CESA and the Federal Endangered Species Act FESA are among our most important tools in the fight to conserve and restore California s native biological diversity Several CNPS programs actively participate in interpreting and enforcing these laws Our Legislation Program works in the California Legislature to improve and clarify the CESA and to defend the law against attempts to weaken or destroy it At the Federal level our Conservation and Land Management Programs perform the same functions for the FESA The CNPS Rare Plant Program maintains information on all rare plant species in California provides management recommendations to the resource protection agencies that implement the laws and works with CNPS Chapters and others to propose imperiled rare plants for protection under the CESA and the FESA The CNPS Education Program works to dispel misconceptions that undermine the effectiveness of these laws and to disseminate information on California s rare species to schools and the public The Conservation Program and CNPS chapters also enforce both FESA and CESA at the project level and in the courts We work with the U S Fish and Wildlife Service the California Department of Fish and Game and other agencies to encourage scientifically rigorous and effective management of rare species and habitats We also challenge of illegal attempts to destroy listed species and their habitats One of the most significant aspects of CNPS work is our fight to secure equal protection for plants under Endangered Species laws Few people realize that the FESA provides almost no protection for Federally listed plants that do not live on Federal lands such as National Forests or National Parks This is in contrast to Federally listed animals which are legally protected from harm no matter where they occur It is in fact legal to intentionally drive Federally listed plants to extinction in some circumstances CNPS has launched the Equal Protection for Plants Campaign whose goal is to obtain changes to Federal law so that plants receive the same protections as animals do At the State level plants are protected as animals are but ambiguous language in the CESA has encouraged some property rights advocates to challenge this protection CNPS is working with State law enforcement and resource protection agencies and with

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/esa.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    Calscape Native Plant Database Native Plant Garden Signs Three P s of Native Gardening CNPS Landscaper Certification Planning Your Garden Getting Started Habitat Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Conservation Program About the Program Actions Archives Statewide Initiatives Chapter Conservation Map Past Initiatives Comment Letters Legislation Tracker Why Conserve Rare Plants Conservation Resources Positions Policies California Native Plant Week Conservation Program Forestry The CNPS Forestry Program is dedicated to protecting the beautifully rich native flora of California s forests and woodlands Through science advocacy and chapter participation the Forestry Program aims to ensure native plants in forests and woodlands receive the protection to which they are entitled Forestry Program

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/forestry/index.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Conservation Program About the Program Actions Archives Statewide Initiatives Chapter Conservation Map Past Initiatives Comment Letters Legislation Tracker Why Conserve Rare Plants Conservation Resources Positions Policies California Native Plant Week Conservation Program Livestock Grazing Livestock grazing impacts more acres of wild native plant communities in California than any other activity Livestock affect all aspects of native ecosystems from plant and animal species composition to water quality CNPS has long been a leader in the search for livestock management techniques that maintain the health native plant and animal communities We focus our grazing advocacy work on Federal lands particularly National Forests and BLM lands where strong resource protection laws mandate that sustainability and good science must guide all land management Issues Statement CNPS has been a leading voice for improved livestock management on Federal lands for almost two decades In California livestock graze almost every plant community that occurs on Federal lands from the hot deserts on BLM lands in the south to the high mountain meadows and lush stream corridors on Sierra Nevada National Forests to coastal prairies on the Los Padres National Forest Pt Reyes National Seashore and elsewhere Improperly managed livestock can wreak havoc in ecosystems spreading invasive non native weeds destroying wetlands accelerating erosion and killing rare species Many California plant communities are too fragile to support any use by livestock High mountain meadows for example dormant much of the year under snow and

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/grazing.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    programs CNPS chapter members participate in a wide variety of local programs to help with this problem Issue Statement Although the term exotic somehow brings up the image of a plant holding a drink with a little umbrella the reality is that exotic means out of place in the California ecosystem Although there has been debate about how long a plant has to have been resident in California to be considered native a practical working definition employs pre European contact as the cut off point while those introduced since that time are considered exotic or non native The problem develops with those exotic plants that spread into the surrounding ecosystems and displace the native plants They do this either because they are free of their home range diseases more aggressive in their growth habits or because they put out more seed that lasts longer in the soil or because there is nothing to eat them or compete with them in the California ecosystem that is being invaded These exotic plant properties may cause a crisis in the web of life of the invaded ecosystem for the newcomer is not a food source and may support no life while the displaced native plants take with them the pyramid of life that used the plant as the prime recycler of solar energy To the casual viewer there is seldom anything to see that would indicate an invasion of exotic plants is taking place The green hills of spring are usually the green grasses of Europe that were introduced by the Spanish with their cattle The feathery plumes of pampas grass on the hills of Big Sur might look like they have always been there However the sad fact is that the invasion is sometimes fast so fast that within a decade the ecosystem of old has completely vanished CNPS has been working with the California Invasive Plant Council Cal IPC and the California Department of Food and Agriculture to identify those plants which are putting California s flora at greatest risk and to find methods to eradicate the menace Agencies such as the Bureau of Land Management the National Park Service US Forest Service and California state parks are also active participants in the fight against pest plants Weed Management Areas are springing up all over the state usually covering one or two counties They are coalitions of private landowners public agencies non profit organizations and grassroots activists formed to combat a common enemy The need to protect natural ecosystems from invasion has run on a parallel and much less well funded path than programs that are designed to control agricultural pest plants although the two paths are beginning to converge Agriculturists have actually opposed including non crop damaging exotic plants in state and federal eradication programs as those programs may ban the shipment or interstate travel of pest contaminated products and obviously cause them some problems However the swift occupation of wildlands and ranching lands by pests such as yellow starthistle

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/exotics.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    California A Guide A guide by the Institute of Ecological Health gives an excellent overview of regional conservation planning Covers all the pertinent laws and concepts in an easy to read format PDF 441k CNPS Resources CNPS staff and volunteer conservation advocates are actively involved in regional conservation planning throughout California The following resources are being developed to facilitate sharing of planning strategies and scientific information CNPS Conservation Forum A web based message board for discussion of conservation related issues This is a good place to post general conservation related questions The Habitat Conservation Plan Natural Community Conservation Program Manual David Chipping CNPS Public Release Edition 2 0 Fall 1999 Note that this manual was prepared before SB 107 and therefore contains outdated information on the NCCP Act and process A revised manual is in preparation NCCP State Statutes Regulations and Guidelines Natural Community Conservation Plans are authorized under State of California Fish and Game Code During the 2001 2002 legislative term a new law was passed which substantially changed the NCCP Act Plans under development may fall under either the old or the new NCCP Act depending upon when the planning agreement was signed California Fish and Game Code 2800 2840 This NCCP Act applies to projects for which planning agreements were approved prior to January 1 2001 PDF In addition to the statutes above the Department of Fish and Game has produces several guidance documents pertinent to the NCCP planning process Since these were mostly prepared prior to the passage of SB 107 we expect to see some changes in the near future NCCP General Process Guidelines Department of Fish and Game January 1998 Except as provided in Fish and Game Code section 2830 these guidelines are superceded by the NCCP Act of 2002 Fish Game Code Section 2800 et seq Improving Public Outreach and Education for Natural Community Conservation Planning Department of Fish and Game Fall 2000 Guidance for the NCCP Independent Science Advisory Process Department of Fish and Game August 2002 Roles Responsibilities of Consultants in Developing NCCP HCPs Department of Fish and Game 2002 Natural Communities Conservation Planning Department of Fish and Game web site Draft Research Guidance to Address the Needs of Land Managers Department of Fish and Game March 1997 HCP Federal Statutes Regulations and Guidelines Habitat Conservation Plans are required under the Federal Endangered Species Act as part of the Section 10 a Incidental Take Permit provision The HCP standards are to fully mitigate for impacts and must not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species Endangered Species Habitat Conservation Planning A U S Fish and Wildlife Service website containing a good overview of the Federal HCP permitting process Habitat Conservation Planning Handbook This is a joint U S Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service handbook Some material such as the complete list of endangered plants and animals is not available in this online version Reports on Regional Conservation Planning Projects The following reports were instrumental in helping to

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/nccp-hcps.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Conservation Program About the Program Actions Archives Statewide Initiatives Chapter Conservation Map Past Initiatives Comment Letters Legislation Tracker Why Conserve Rare Plants Conservation Resources Positions Policies California Native Plant Week Conservation Program Wetlands CNPS maintains active programs to conserve California s wetlands and the rare and common native species that inhabit them CNPS is concerned that the biological integrity of these resources is being compromised by fragmentation degraded by incompatible adjacent land use and lost through ill advised mitigation practices One of our greatest challenges of the early 2000 s will be saving vernal pools and similar seasonal wetlands Issues Statement Wetlands consist not only of the obvious river and lakes but also the little seeps springs bogs vernal pools and areas of high water table that support so much of the California flora For centuries wetlands have been considered as nuisances taking up room that could otherwise be occupied by productive farms and housing They and their attendant species of animals and plants have been decimated by draining and filling One of the greatest wetlands in North America at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley has almost completely vanished along with the millions of birds that used to live there There used to be 4 5 million acres of wetland in the Central Valley and by the mid 1980 s only percent remained Nationally we have lost over 122 million acres of wetland and in a recent decade were still losing between 84 000 and 886 000 acres CNPS is committed to saving what remains One of our greatest challenges is to save the species rich vernal pools of the state These ephemeral pools form in the winter and spring and are gone by

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/wetlands.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Conservation - California Native Plant Society
    Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Conservation Program About the Program Actions Archives Statewide Initiatives Chapter Conservation Map Past Initiatives Comment Letters Legislation Tracker Why Conserve Rare Plants Conservation Resources Positions Policies California Native Plant Week Conservation Program These links will take you off the CNPS web site Please bookmark your place before proceeding Last updated July 28 2009 Conservation Organizations Amphibia Web about amphibian conservation American Lands Alliance Audubon At Home personal conservation of yards and neighborhoods Audubon California The California Chaparral Field Institute California Coast Records Project Photos of the California coast California Lichen Society California Nonprofits Working for Sustainability California Wilderness Coalition Center for Biological Diversity Center for Plant Conservation Defenders of Wildlife EarthFirst Journal Earth Share coalition of environmental and conservation charities Ecological Society of America Elkhorn Slough Foundation Endangered Species Coalition EnviroLink The EnviroLink Library ESRI Conservation Program using GIS for conservation Forests Forever Forestry Conservation Portal Friends of the Earth Friends of the Santa Clara River Greenbelt Alliance Bay Area s citizen land conservation and urban planning organization Heritage Forests Campaign Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Mountains Group of San Gorgonio Chapter Sierra Club National Council for Science and the Environment National Wildlife Federation Native Forest Council Natural Resources Defense Council New Mexico

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/conservation/conserv_links.php (2016-04-26)
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