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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Document Archive Document Archive Policy Regarding Mitigation of Impacts to Rare and Endangered Plants Adopted by the CNPS Board of Directors June 6 1987 The policy of the California Native Plant Society is that all potential direct indirect and cumulative impacts to rare threatened or endangered plants and their habitats must be assessed and that appropriate measures be implemented to prevent such impacts resulting from projects The policy of the Society is also that environmental documents and mitigation plans be based on complete accurate and current scientific information Viability of rare threatened or endangered plants and their habitats takes precedence over economic or political expediency Because of the tremendous diversity of rare plant habitats in California and the dependence of rare plants on their local habitats it is imperative that mitigation measures be developed on a site specific basis Local environmental conditions species biology land use patterns and other factors must be incorporated into the design

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/mitigation2.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Document Archive Document

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/ryegrass.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    Habitat Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Document Archive

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/feral_pigs.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Document Archive Document Archive Policy on Sowing of Wildflowers Adopted June 1989 PDF Version CNPS is concerned

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/wildflowers.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Document Archive Document Archive Policy on Oak Hardwoods Adopted September 1989 PDF Version Issue Statement The native oaks of California are a distinctive and unique feature of our landscape Because of the rapid and extensive land conversions in oak woodlands savannas and riparian areas of the state coupled with an apparent lack of regeneration of several species the California Native Plant Society is deeply concerned about the long term survival of native oaks Fragmentation of oak habitats reduces their ability to provide the full range of ecological benefits including maintenance of species diversity soil and watershed protection and wildlife recreational and aesthetic values For most native oak species basic ecological information is incomplete current management decisions are being made based upon inadequate understanding of their consequences for oaks Adequate attention voluntary regulatory or legislative is not being paid to native oaks at the local county or state levels The goals of CNPS are to protect maintain and restore native oaks and their natural communities for present and future generations Oak Hardwood Policy CNPS policy is to educate ourselves and others about the values of native oaks to support and encourage research about the ecology and distribution of native oaks to encourage voluntary conservation of these species and where necessary to advocate regulation in order to prevent further loss of oak habitats in both urban and rural areas The Society supports an accelerated program of data collection census information and mapping of all oak species Quercus spp beginning with the valley oak Quercus lobata and Engelman oak Quercus engelmanni CNPS supports land use decisions which permit uses of the land consistent with the long term

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/oaks.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    s of Native Gardening CNPS Landscaper Certification Planning Your Garden Getting Started Habitat Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Document Archive Document Archive Policy on Transplanting Adopted December 1989 PDF Version Native plants plant communities and their habitats on public and private lands are subject to increasing development and use pressures Little scientific information is available on the long term success of transplanting to mitigate impacts on the plants The preponderance of evidence to date demonstrates that transplanting naturally occurring wild plants does not represent a successful method of long term conservation Therefore The California Native Plant Society requests all responsible agencies and persons involved with the maintenance of

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/transplanting.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    Conservation of Nonvascular Plants The California Native Plant Society is concerned that nonvascular plants cryptograms such as lichens algae fungi mosses and liverworts are not usually considered as a biological resource by resource agencies or other lead agencies in California Environmental Quality Act CEQA or General Plan Law documents By their ubiquity abundance and diversity nonvascular plants are an important component of the California flora Many occupy habitats inhospitable to vascular plants and may be the only plant organisms that occupy certain sites These plants macro and microscopic are critical and essential within the integrated ecosystems They provide habitat forage and refuge for terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates They modify soil or rock substrate which may allow other plants to attach and grow thereby increasing the potential diversity of habitat They reduce organic material and enhance uptake of nutrients by other plants perhaps serving as symbionts and fix nitrogen that becomes available to other organisms Nonvascular plants have been reduced in number diversity abundance and range as many species in natural areas by the reduction in habitat area Aquatic freshwater and marine and terrestrial desert forest grassland scrub chaparral and woodland systems have all been affected to some extent by human activity and all contain nonvascular plants Some groups of nonvascular plants can be used to indicate the environmental health of an area Population changes of some species may be valuable for measuring the effects of human activities on the environment For example the loss of lichens may indicate increased air pollutants The loss of mosses may suggest a decrease in soil moisture A change in the relative abundance of algae may indicate chemical or temperature changes of water With these thoughts in mind the CNPS makes the following policy statement concerning nonvascular plants WHEREAS nonvascular plants are valid

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/nonvascular.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Archive - California Native Plant Society
    nation and the world The destruction of biologically valuable habitat must be slowed if not stopped by using political legislative and economic strategies Nevertheless we recognize that for some species the risk of extinction is so high that only aggressive and extraordinary measure may effect their conservation Such measures remove plants or propagules from their habitats into cold storage gardens or managed sites in the hope that the species can be re established in the wild at some later date Those measures fall under the realm of ex situ conservation Ex situ conservation involves a temporary short term set of germplasm preservation techniques that are usually applied as choices of last resort the techniques include but are not limited to propagule collection from natural populations and cryogenic storage garden propagation tissue culture transplantation and the establishment of new populations in nature Such techniques do not conserve all of the genetic variation the metapopulation characteristics the symbionts the associated species the community as a whole the habitat or the ecosystem of the endangered plant Consequently they do not conserve a species in its entirety and they do not conserve a species within its evolutionary and ecological contexts For these reasons and also because we lack a solid knowledge of the effectiveness and limits of ex situ techniques at this time we view the application of such techniques with scientific skepticism However the members of CNPS recognize the gravity of the extinction problem and will not oppose the sue of certain ex situ conservation techniques under certain circumstances Those circumstances can be summarized as one of two general types 1 During mandated recovery of endangered species ex situ techniques may be essential for establishing new populations when all extant natural populations are fully protected in situ This approach if successful can result in a gross as opposed to net increase in the number of extant populations of an endangered species All recovery activities including those which use ex situ techniques must be designed and executed by qualified biologists with the approval of relevant state and federal government agencies e g California Department of Fish and Game U S Fish and Wildlife Service 2 During the analysis of extinction probabilities for a given species usually base on demographic or minimum viable population studies it is determined that the remaining natural population s is are likely to go extinct in the near future due to stochastic genetic or natural ecological factors This approach can minimize the effect of degenerative extinction processes that are effective when the population s is are very small Such analysis must be conducted by qualified biologists with the approval of relevant state and federal government agencies e g California Department of Fish and Game U S Fish and Wildlife Service We continue to strongly oppose the use of ex situ conservation techniques under the following circumstances 1 When applied as mitigation for human caused impacts to natural populations other than those impacts which operate on a global scale e g

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/archive/ex_situ.php (2016-04-26)
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