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  • Managing Pests - California Native Plant Society
    Plants Calscape Native Plant Database Native Plant Garden Signs The Three P s of Native Gardening CNPS Landscaper Certification Planning Your Garden Getting Started Habitat Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Management Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog Managing Pests Problems with plants can be caused either by vertebrates such as rodents or deer invertebrates like nematodes insects or mites or fungi and disease The Integrated Pest Management approach advocated here emphasizes mechanical control such as physical barriers and careful cultivation and an understanding of the life cycles of plants and their predators The first step in pest management is selecting the right plant for the right area Choosing the right plant for your site will translate into healthier plants and reduced pest problems Water needs soil type exposure and function and form all enter into the selection of an appropriate plant or landscape suite Front yards are often landscaped differently than backyards Homeowners and gardeners have different criteria and needs for landscaping You can access a helpful guide for analyzing your site conditions and selecting the appropriate plants for your site by clicking here One very important concept in pest management is threshold or action level When does the pest population and subsequent damage reach a level that requires action This threshold level can be very different for front versus backyards If gardeners and landscapers can relax their pest threshold for a time natural predators will often build up populations that will control the problem Plantings in public areas or schools may need to meet different criteria a more stringent threshold level for public safety The University of California s Integrated Pest Management UC IPM website is a wonderful guide to the least toxic IPM treatments for home and garden pests that have crossed the threshold and require some type of management The UC IPM site contains environmentally and scientifically sound recommendations that meet most management needs including less radical methods such as hosing insects off the plant and soft pesticides such as detergent oil sprays or Bt These methods are considered to be environmentally friendly and less detrimental to beneficial insects and other natural predators Pesticide alternatives are also listed to provide management in difficult situations Compared to introduced plants California native plants are likely to be less troubled by native pest organisms because they have co evolved Damage from pests is usually cosmetic and temporary Such damage can even be welcomed such as with caterpillars like the large Ceanothus silk moth or with Oak galls and oak moths which have evolved with oak trees in California for millions of years It is common practice to plant for butterflies why not plant for caterpillars and beetles In the backyard most pests of native plants can easily be tolerated especially when predator and prey insects and

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/grownative/pests.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Native Plant Lists - California Native Plant Society
    Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Gardening Program About the Program Why Garden with Natives Benefits of Native Plants Calscape Native Plant Database Native Plant Garden Signs The Three P s of Native Gardening CNPS Landscaper Certification Planning Your Garden Getting Started Habitat Gardening School Gardens Patio Gardens Sample Garden Plans Ditch Your Lawn Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Management Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog Native Plant Lists by Region In addition to their natural beauty California natives provide water conserving drought tolerant and sustainable garden design choices Find native plants for your own garden using the lists below which are maintained by local CNPS chapters More benefits of native plants Importance of conservation Find your local chapter Bay Area East Bay Napa Valley Marin Santa Clara Valley Yerba Buena Central Coast Santa Cruz Monterey Bay San Luis Obispo Central Valley Kern County Sacramento Valley Sequoia North Coast Dorothy King Young North Coast Milo Baker Sanhedrin Shasta Mount Lassen Shasta Sierra Regions Bristlecone El Dorado Redbud Sierra Foothills Southern Coastal San Diego South Coast LA Santa Monica Channel Islands Southern Inland San Gabriel Mountains California Native Plants on Calscape Find native plants for YOUR California location with a simple search or choose a city from the list below Select a City Alhambra Alpine Anaheim Angeles National Forest Antioch Apple Valley Auburn Avalon Bakersfield Barstow Berkeley Big Bear Lake Big Pine Bishop Blythe Borrego Springs Brawley Bridgeport Buena Park Burbank Buttonwillow Carlsbad Carmel by the Sea Carson Chico Chino Chowchilla Chula Vista Cleveland National Forest Clovis Coaliga Colusa Compton Concord Corning Corona Costa Mesa Crescent City Daly City Death Valley National Park Desert Center Downieville El Cajon

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/grownative/lists.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Start a Native Plant Garden - California Native Plant Society
    Where to Buy Natives Events Calendar Identifying Native Plants Propagation Native Plant Resources For Your Home Garden Arboretums Botanic Gardens Invasive Weeds Pest Mgmt Invasive Weeds Managing Pests Native Plant Lists Horticultural Research Gardening Blog About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Gardening Program About the Program Why Garden with Natives Benefits of Native Plants Calscape

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/grownative/research.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Rare Plant Program - California Native Plant Society
    then a meeting will be held in order to discuss the data more fully and come to an agreement on what the best action would be to take Calochortus striatus photo by Swift 1998 Once a species has gone through the above review process information on all aspects of the species listing status habitat distribution threats etc are entered into the online CNPS Inventory The print and online versions of the CNPS Inventory are used by thousands of professional and amateur botanists throughout the state Consultants and planners preparing environmental documents use the CNPS Inventory to determine the potential for resource conflicts and the scope of necessary botanical surveys Resource managers use the information to guide rare plant protection and the acquisition and management of preserve areas Conservationists use the same data to review environmental documents and prepare testimony to educate decision makers Researchers use the information to evaluate trends and changes in populations of rare plants The Program currently recognizes more than 1600 plant taxa species subspecies and varieties as rare or endangered in California CNPS Lists 1B and 2 This constitutes approximately 20 of California s native flora More than 500 additional species are on the CNPS list of plants of limited distribution List 4 a watch list and approximately 55 additional species are on the CNPS list of taxa about which we need more information List 3 The Inventory also contains information on approximately 25 native plants that are presumed to have gone extinct in California in the last 100 years primarily because of land conversion to agriculture and urban development For more information on the Rare Plant Status Review Process please read How to Add Change or Delete a Species The Relationship between CNPS and the California Department of Fish and Game Lupinus constancei photo by Imper 1983 The Program operates under a Memorandum of Understanding MOU with the California Department of Fish and Game DFG The MOU outlines broad cooperation in rare plant assessment and protection and formalizes cooperative ventures such as data sharing and production of complementary information sources for rare plants To facilitate this cooperation the Rare Plant Botanist is housed at the Sacramento office of the DFG s Biogeographic Data Branch CNPS and the DFG Natural Diversity Data Base CNDDB share all data files and rare plant information and work together on a daily basis to provide current accurate information on the distribution endangerment status and ecology of California s rare flora Once a species has undergone the CNPS Review Process and has been added to a CNPS List CNDDB uses the information gathered to map the rarest plant species to their precise locations CNDDB makes this information available through RareFind or custom Geographic Information Systems GIS maps and digital information While CNPS updates data more continuously location information is reported more precisely by CNDDB Volunteers The Program relies heavily on volunteer participation Over 500 volunteer collaborators contribute rare plant data and review proposed changes to the CNPS Inventory They provide a

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/rareplants/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Rare Plant Program - California Native Plant Society
    the California Environmental Quality Act CEQA often use the Online Inventory to help determine the potential for resource conflicts and to develop project specific lists of rare plants to target during botanical surveys Conservationists and resource managers use the same information to review environmental documents and prepare public testimony to influence decision makers As a result the Online Inventory directly guides rare plant protection efforts conservation planning and land acquisition and management The 8th Edition could not have been completed without a significant large contribution from a private donor a smaller CNPS Board allocation from funds donated by the late June Bilisoly and a number of other contributions from users of the database CNPS offers our sincere appreciation for these financial contributions as well as the combined efforts of many other individuals who helped with the design development and implementation of the project More information CNPS Ranking System CNPS Status Review Process Fall and Summer Flowering Rare Plants of California s Deserts PDF 49kb The 7th Edition of the Online CNPS Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants CNPS Inventory data was first made available online in 2001 with the release of the Online Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants Online Inventory 7th Edition The 7th Edition of the Online Inventory is still fully functional and available to use by following the link below Online Inventory 7th Edition The 6th Edition of the CNPS Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants While some of the data present in the 6th edition Inventory is out of date there is still a lot of information that is extremely useful and valuable for those involved in rare plant conservation Information present in the introductory material covers a wide range of topics that are important in the conservation of rare plant species Introductory Material Below are select introductory articles from the 6th edition CNPS Inventory Introduction to the 6th edition CNPS Inventory History of the CNPS Rare Plant Program and Inventory Uses of the CNPS Inventory How use of the CNPS Inventory can promote the preservation of rare plants and their habitats Numerical Analysis of This and Previous Editions The size of California s rare and endangered flora continues to grow as this analysis of the past six editions of the Inventory demonstrates Rarity in Vascular Plants by Peggy Fiedler Rare Bryophytes in California by James Shevock Bibliography for Biology and Conservation of Rare Plants by Peggy Fiedler and James Smith Jr Conserving Plants with Laws and Programs Under the Department of Fish and Game by Sandra Morey and Diane Ikeda The California Natural Diversity Database California s Natural Heritage Program by Roxanne Bittman The Federal Endangered Species Act and Rare Plant Protection in California by Jim Bartel Jan Knight and Diane Elam Rare Plant Management on the National Forests and Grasslands in California by Bradley Powell Rare Plant Conservation on Bureau of Land Management Lands by John Willoughby Updates to the CNPS Inventory 6th Edition Silene serpentinicola was added to the CNPS Inventory List 1B

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/rareplants/inventory/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Lichens of Conservation Concern - California Native Plant Society
    Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Rare Campaign About the Program Vegetation Program Services Manual of CA Vegetation The Online Manual 2009 2nd Edition of the Manual State Natural Communities List MCV State Classification List Vegetation Sampling Classification Mapping Mapping Guidelines Field Forms Protocols Classification Map Reports Sampler Newsletters Alliances Associations Vegetation Resources Vegetation Program Initiatives Carrizo Plain NM Veg Project Grassland Initiative MCV Database Project N Sierra Foothills Veg Map S Sierra Foothills Veg Surveys Rare Plant Comm Initiative Contact Program Staff Rare Plant Program About the Program Rare Plant Inventory Lichens of Conservation Concern Rare Plant Ranking System Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Project Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Resources Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Opportunities Rare Campaign Rare Plant Program Lichens of Conservation Concern in the CNPS Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants Through working closely with the California Lichen Society s CALS Conservation Committee the CNPS Rare Plant Program began including Lichens of Conservation Concern in the CNPS Inventory in 2014 For at least 25 years prior to their addition to the Inventory rare lichens have been included in the California Natural Diversity Database CNDDB a resource maintained by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife that is fundamental to the conservation of many organisms The time came for rare lichens to be afforded similar protections as rare plants

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/rareplants/inventory/lichens.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Rare Plant Program - California Native Plant Society
    CEQA as they meet the definition of Rare or Endangered under CEQA Guidelines 15125 c and or 15380 California Rare Plant Rank 1B Plants Rare Threatened or Endangered in California and Elsewhere Plants with a California Rare Plant Rank of 1B are rare throughout their range with the majority of them endemic to California Most of the plants that are ranked 1B have declined significantly over the last century California Rare Plant Rank 1B plants constitute the majority of taxa in the CNPS Inventory with more than 1 000 plants assigned to this category of rarity All of the plants constituting California Rare Plant Rank 1B meet the definitions of the California Endangered Species Act of the California Department of Fish and Game Code and are eligible for state listing Impacts to these species or their habitat must be analyzed during preparation of environmental documents relating to CEQA or those considered to be functionally equivalent to CEQA as they meet the definition of Rare or Endangered under CEQA Guidelines 15125 c and or 15380 California Rare Plant Rank 2A Plants Presumed Extirpated in California But Common Elsewhere Penstemon janishiae CRPR 2 2 photo by Cheryl Beyer Plants with a California Rare Plant Rank of 2A are presumed extirpated because they have not been observed or documented in California for many years This list only includes plants that are presumed extirpated in California but more common elsewhere in their range All of the plants constituting California Rare Plant Rank 2A meet the definitions of the California Endangered Species Act of the California Department of Fish and Game Code and are eligible for state listing Should these species be rediscovered any impacts proposed to individuals or their habitat must be analyzed during preparation of environmental documents relating to CEQA or those considered to be functionally equivalent to CEQA as they meet the definition of Rare or Endangered under CEQA Guidelines 15125 c and or 15380 California Rare Plant Rank 2B Plants Rare Threatened or Endangered in California But More Common Elsewhere Except for being common beyond the boundaries of California plants with a California Rare Plant Rank of 2B would have been ranked 1B From the federal perspective plants common in other states or countries are not eligible for consideration under the provisions of the Federal Endangered Species Act With California Rare Plant Rank 2B we recognize the importance of protecting the geographic range of widespread species In this way we protect the diversity of our own state s flora and help maintain evolutionary processes and genetic diversity within species All of the plants constituting California Rare Plant Rank 2B meet the definitions of the California Endangered Species Act of the California Department of Fish and Game Code and are eligible for state listing Impacts to these species or their habitat must be analyzed during preparation of environmental documents relating to CEQA or those considered to be functionally equivalent to CEQA as they meet the definition of Rare or Endangered under CEQA

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/rareplants/ranking.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Ranks 2A and 2B - Rare Plant Program - California Native Plant Society
    Ranks 2A and 2B Rare Plant Data Status Review Process Rare Plant Forums Rare Plant Status Review Rare Plant Phenology Rare Plant Photos Locally Rare Plants Botanical Survey Guidelines Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Project Background and Results Volunteer Signup RPTH Event Calendar Critical Rare Plant Data Needs Data Collection Reporting Resources Annual RPTH Award Winners Stories from the Field Funding and Support Opportunities Rare Campaign The California Rare Plant Ranking System CNPS announces new and revised California Rare Plant Ranks 2A and 2B Poliomintha incana Photo by Al Schneider With the advent of the new California Rare Plant Ranks Poliomintha incana was recently changed from CRPR 1A to 2A It is presumed extirpated in California where only known from a single historical collection from 1938 at Cushenbury Springs San Bernardino County Poliomintha incana was possibly extirpated in California from mining activities Like all CRPR 2A plants it is common outside of the state and still has the potential to be rediscovered in California In order to better define and categorize rarity in California s flora the CNPS Rare Plant Program and Rare Plant Program Committee have developed the new California Rare Plant Ranks CRPR 2A and CRPR 2B CRPR 2B contains all of the plants formerly included on CRPR 2 and are defined as plants that are rare in California but are more common outside of the state s boundaries CRPR 2A includes a small number of plants formerly included on CRPR 1A which are presumed extirpated in California but more common elsewhere These new ranks help further clarify that CRPR 2 plants are more common outside of California while emphasizing that CRPR 1 plants are rare throughout their entire range Furthermore with the addition of CRPR 2A the definition of 1A has been revised to include only those plants

    Original URL path: http://cnps.org/cnps/rareplants/rank-2a_2b.php (2016-04-26)
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