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  • Hughes Saia Instructor Guide
    and asked to construct one alternative Alternatively each group could be assigned to use the ethics tests to argue in favor of an assigned alternative with the presentation structured somewhat like a debate Integrating the exercise into a class This exercise requires that the students have some facility with the ethics tests unless you are using the exercise to introduce the tests to them If you are introducing the tests with this exercise then you should make sure you have covered them in detail in a prior class period Some summary of the points learned and connection to the next day is always helpful at the end of class In this case the point may be about the range of options Saia really has the importance of professional standards the complexity of decisions in an organization and the necessity of making ethical choices not to choose is in fact to choose in this exercise Which of these things you emphasize will depend on where you are in your class This is an excellent exercise to use to emphasize the importance of setting the appropriate moral climate in an organization The ACM code of ethics is explicit about the responsibility of leaders in organizations to do this and this is a case of a person who had that opportunity and turned it down Time required In a small class if student do the evaluation of options outside of class you can spend 15 minutes of class discussion evaluating the standard options and listing the imaginative options student add to the list If structured as a debate or as an introduction to the tests the exercise can easily take up a class hour Introducing the exercise It is important to be specific with students about what they should put in the cells

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/saia_exercise/hughes_saia_inst_guide.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Saia Exercise Resources
    Ethics tests worksheet Options for Frank Saia Evaluate the following solution alternatives using the ethics tests worksheet You can simply look the other way and allow the LaRue to continue passing the chips without properly testing them You can call LaRue to task for passing the chips without proper tests and require that he carry out these tests no matter how long it takes You can offer to back him

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/saia_exercise/hughes_saia_ex_resource.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Reporting System Learning Objetives
    in evaluation and decision making By designing and evaluating their own system students are getting practice in making ethical decision that affect the organizational climate of their potential employers Lead students to actual responsible action This exercise is a rehearsal for the sort of proposal that a student might really make when employed at an organization that has an inadequate or missing reporting system ImpactCS Elements and Skills ES1 2 Why be ethical ES1 3 Major ethical models ES1 5 Codes of ethics and professional responsibility for computer professionals ES2 1 Ethical claims can and should be discussed rationally ES2 2 Ethical choices cannot be avoided ES2 3 Some easy ethical approaches are questionable Naive Relativism Naive Egoism Naive Agency Naive Legalism ES3 1 Arguing from example analogy and counter example ES3 2 Identifying stakeholders in concrete situations ES3 2 Identifying ethical issues in concrete situations ES3 4 Applying ethical codes to concrete situations ES3 5 Identifying and evaluating possible courses of action ES4 2 Power relations are central in all social interaction ES4 4 Populations are always diverse ImpactCS grid Ethical Issues Quality of Life Use of Power Risk and Reliability Property Rights Privacy Equity and Access Honesty and

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/reporting_system_exercise/hughes_rpt_sys_learn_ob.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Reporting System Instrutor Guide
    what roles and qualifications will be for those evaluating the reports These are two examples There is a large number of decisions to make and the document from the NRC can suggest these decisions to students Each group then makes a three minute report to the class about their system After each report the other groups are each allowed one minute to present a critique of the system Integrating the exercise into a class This is a useful exercise for the whistleblowing section of the class It might also be used in the section on professionalism or on the ethics tests Using the ethics tests with this exercise helps to emphasize that the tests apply not just to individual decision but to corporate decisions on policy Time required This exercise will take all of a one hour class and the pace will need to be brisk to make it work It might be better to spread the work over more than one day with design of the policies done on one day and reporting critique done on a second day Making and grading assignments As a final homework exercise students might be asked to write individual papers using the ethics tests to evaluate one or more of the proposed systems Possible difficulties Since this exercise is speculative in nature what might work at Hughes students may have some difficulty in getting down to a procedure when they don t know all the details they would like But answering detail often become an infinite loop since often students want detail that will make the right choice obvious There is no single obvious right answer for designing a reporting system Stick to the documents rather than speculate on what ifs It might be helpful for students to imagine themselves as consultants to

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/reporting_system_exercise/hughes_rprt_sys_ins_guide.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Reporting System Exercise Resource
    Hughes Reporting System Links to case readings Central Readings Nuclear Regulatory Commission s procedure for Differing Professional Opinions PDF Goodearl Introduction Lisa Lightner Incident Shirley Reddick Incident AMRAAM Incident Saia gets a call Potential Background Readings Organizational Chart Hughes Life

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/reporting_system_exercise/hughes_rpt_sys_ex_resource.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Obligatory Learning Objective
    in evaluation and decision making If students write a paper or spend significant class time using the De George criteria they will have acquired practice in evaluating a decision Lead students to actual responsible action This exercise does not really accomplish this goal However you might pose a problem of software piracy or cheating for them that is set in their own environment and that fits the De George criteria e g a student who is employed as a programmer on a safety critical system like a system for the campus police and who is caught cheating Asking students what they would do in this situation will lead toward considering responsible action ImpactCS Elements and Skills ES1 2 Why be ethical ES2 1 Ethical claims can and should be discussed rationally ES2 2 Ethical choices cannot be avoided ES2 3 Some easy ethical approaches are questionable ES3 2 Identifying stakeholders in concrete situations ES3 2 Identifying ethical issues in concrete situations ES3 5 Identifying and evaluating possible courses of action ES4 2 Power relations are central in all social interaction ImpactCS grid Ethical Issues Quality of Life Use of Power Risk and Reliability Property Rights Privacy Equity and Access Honesty

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/obligatory_exercise/obligatory_learn_obj.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Obligatory Instructor Guidelines
    the class and having groups debate pro and con for each of the criteria Integrating the exercise into a class This exercise can be done with little prerequisite preparation other than the immediate reading It is thus a good activity to liven up a week devoted to professional responsibility This exercise might also be connected with other ones like the Hughes memo exercise or the Hughes Reporting System exercise to constitute along with some lecture a course module on professionalism Time required A short version done as a whole class discussion with the reading done in preparation before class could take 15 minutes The standard version could be stretched to take a 90 minute class period Introducing the exercise Little additional preparation is required for this exercise Students should be reminded that their job is to evaluate Goodearl s course of action and not to judge other actors in the case Making and grading assignments The assignments you give in this case depend upon your goals You need nothing other than the reading if your goal is simply to make student aware of the issues But if it is to give them practice in making decisions in a professional context then you may want to have an assignment that structures and documents individual analysis of the decision Within this exercise you have the option of requiring a short paper either before the in class discussion or after or both A before class short paper might be due first thing in class and might simply ask students to use their own judgment to determine whether they would recommend Goodearl blow the whistle This would be based on reading the four Goodearl scenarios and perhaps in addition the pages about whistleblowing An after class paper could be informed by De George s

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/obligatory_exercise/hughes_ob_instr_guide.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Hughes Obligatory Exercise Resources
    three conditions establish when whistleblowing is morally permissible The addition of the last two conditions make whistleblowing morally obligatory Morally Permissible There is a substantial threat of a serious and considerable harm to members of the public One has made one s concerns known to immediate supervisors One has exhausted internal channels and has not received an appropriate or adequate response Moral Obligatory One has documented evidence that would convince an impartial observer There is a reasonable chance of success i e that publicizing the immanent harm will prevent it Questions for Group Discussion Which conditions does Goodearl meet Provide evidence from the case to support your position Which conditions does Goodearl lack Provide evidence from the case to support your position Is whistle blowing morally permissible for Goodearl Defend your position based on the criteria Do additional criteria occur to you Is it morally obligatory Defend your decision based on the criteria Given what you know about what happens to whistleblowers would you encourage Goodearl to blow the whistle Goodearl s Responsibilities Listed here are a set of responsibilities that Goodearl has based on her relations to others It is better to have a class generate a list like

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/exercises/obligatory_exercise/hughes_ob_exerc_resource.html (2016-04-30)
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