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  • Count Your Costs
    the likely chance of being retaliated against by the organization on which you are blowing the whistle We will be citing some statistics on this page about the likely costs that whistleblowers will bear These are taken from careful research done by Rothschild and Miethe 14 who interviewed or surveyed over 750 dissenters or whistleblowers More research on the likely costs of whistleblowing can be found in our bibliography Rothchild and Miethe s 1999 research indicate that organizational retaliation is both severe and common They document the following forms and rates of retaliation that occurred to people who dissented significantly within their company Form of retaliation 1 Lost their job or were forced to retire 69 2 Received negative job performance evaluations 64 3 Had work more closely monitored by supervisors 68 4 Was criticized or avoided by coworkers 69 5 Were blacklisted from getting another job in their field 64 These forms of retaliation become 10 to 15 more frequent for those who go public outside the company to blow the whistle Non supervisors vs supervisors African Americans vs whites and whistleblowers who report about activities involving more than 100 000 were retaliated against more often The outcomes of this retaliation can be severe for whistleblowers The most common effects that Rothschild and Miethe 14 document are Effects on Whistleblowers 1 Severe depression or anxiety 84 2 Feelings of isolation or powerlessness 84 3 Distrust of Others 78 4 Declining physical health 69 5 Severe financial decline 66 6 Problems with family relations 53 Those who dissent or who go further to blow the whistle rarely anticipate consequences this severe but the research documents their frequency Still in spite of the suffering they have endured 90 of the dissenters and whistleblowers still say they would report the misconduct if

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/support_docs/whistleblowing/costs.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Obtain background materials and evidence
    keep a notebook and regular backup copies even of paper material that both catalogues your evidence and provides the context for it You should date everything that you obtain and date the notes you take Do not do anything illegal to obtain your documentation but do be creative about the forms of documentation and how they interlink than you can get Written evidence is some of the most important evidence Keeping supporting documentation of all kinds is key You should record all dates and times when events related to your case occur when you receive or obtain documents and when you consult with others If other employees are present when these events occur record their names so they can back up your story When recording events stay as close to the facts as you can without drawing inferences about motivations that people might have What did they say What happened If the company tries to fire you or asks you to resign because of specific problems you will need to have documentation that you are doing your job well and that there are no complaints lodged against you Obtain a copy of your past performance records It is possible that

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/support_docs/whistleblowing/evidence.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Organize to protect your own interests
    your case to a minimum This may lead you to involve your family and friends as outside sources for general support but withholding the details After mustering all the documentary evidence you can and making sure you have support from friends and family consult a lawyer about the paths you can take as a whistleblower Both case law and government statutes are constantly changing Consulting a legal professional particularly one

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/support_docs/whistleblowing/interest.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Choose the right avenue for your disclosure
    choose as a venue for disclosure you should make sure you only disclose the information you need to support your case Your negotiation with your disclosure partner should include confidentiality for you and others is that is possible And you should be concerned to make you disclosure in a way that minimizes disruption to your organization if possible Remember information is your main resource in a whistleblowing disclosure and once you have released it to someone else you may have little control over it Here are some risks and benefits of disclosure to different parties Governmental agencies Some governmental agencies are especially equipped with hotlines for whistleblowers Since they were working for a private company that had a contract with the military Goodearl and Ibarra made their disclosures to the Office of the Inspector General for the U S Military Legal counsel can help you in deciding if there is such a special reporting agency for your circumstance Government agencies certainly oversee a great deal of business in the United States and this oversight varies from country to country These agencies can often be the most effective allies in your campaign But you should be aware that they may have conflicts of interest with your disclosure Again legal counsel can help you in thinking this through Judicial Systems For any clearly illegal activity often state or federal district attorneys are the appropriate pathway of disclosure But again their reasons for picking up or ignoring a case may be influenced by motives outside your own such as case load the need to find cases to set case law and ambition You will need someone you knows the ground here to advise you about this option Legislators Often local state or federal legislators can help you find your way to the right

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/support_docs/whistleblowing/venue.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Make your disclosure in the right spirit
    employees make their disclosures in a manner that minimizes the damage to their organizations 8 You owe a confidentiality duty to your employers trade secrets stakeholders and other proprietary information Disclosure of detailed confidential information may make you subject to legal liability for your actions 13 Disclose your information only to the extent necessary and only to one of the authorities who expressly agree to keep confidential information confidential If

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/case_materials/hughes/support_docs/whistleblowing/spirit.html (2016-04-30)
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