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  • Makeing your rubric
    on which you might evaluate an essay or presentation etc but to simplify both your life and that of your students you need to choose the few say 3 to 7 at most 20 or so you will emphasize for this exercise A grading rubric with 57 dimensions makes your life harder not easier and merely confuses the students rather than guiding them toward the important skills So choose your dimensions wisely and make sure they fit in with the goals of your class the level of your students the time in the semester etc These dimensions are the central leverage you will have List levels of achievement of each goal For each dimension think of what the major clusters of achievement might be from none at all e g does not even mention the process of ethical dissent to excellent explains each step with examples and describes how they form a process You may find yourself with just 3 steps nothing some lots or more For the sake of simplicity try not to do more than 5 steps in achievement for any dimension If it looks like you need more ask yourself whether you can break the dimension into two dimensions and have fewer levels in each Assign Numbers in Some Way Once you have the dimensions and the levels of achievement for each you now have a grading rubric in the form of a matrix I find it easiest if I actually format the rubric as a table You can assign point values for each level of achievement for each dimension You can weight the dimensions differently or equally to get the final grade for the product I always use points in the cells of the table and sum them but other simply give a wholistic grade after

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  • Using the Rubric to Grade
    obsession of mine but if you insist go right ahead Make it one of your dimensions and decide how much weight to give that dimension But once you have graded that dimension do your best to grade the other dimensions independently of the grammar that obscures the student s thinking Otherwise you punish them twice for a single failing Set a standard rule for close calls There will be close calls Perhaps the student s presentation makes it just barely out of the basement of achievement but you are not comfortable giving the benefit of the doubt The answer herer is to establish a regular rules for these cases and always follow it On rules might be to split the points give a 5 if it is between 0 and 1 Another might be to round up or down Pick a rule a stick to it and let students know what you did This helps reduce the agonizing over the partial points Be willing to toss it for creative acts On occasion I find a student has done something interesting reasonably well but not according to the rubric they knew about Usually I ask students to tell me about this

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/teaching_with_cases/rubrics_grading/using_rubric_grade.html (2016-04-30)
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  • General Comments about Rubrics
    the problem that giving the rubric to students meant everyone all did well on the assignment Giving out the grading rubric ahead of time does not make the assignment easier It does make it clear just how hard the assignment is Learn from experience Every time I grade using a rubric I find problems with it Sometimes an item is to vague or too unclear Sometimes I forget to include a dimension that seems crucial given the papers I now see Sometimes there are simple misprints I forgive myself for being human and then try to figure out how to change it for the next time around I recommend this rather than agonizing over how to fix things for that class If the students got the rubric ahead of time they knew what they were aiming at and justice is well enough served for the moment Target the skills or performances you care about I have on occasion removed an item from the rubric because it seemed everyone was getting it and there was no need to mention it and if felt obvious Then I would find in the next term that very few people did the thing that was

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/teaching_with_cases/rubrics_grading/rubric_gen_comments.html (2016-04-30)
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  • ACM/IEEE Computer Society Curriculum 1991
    computer science curriculum CC91 defined computer science as a hybrid of methematice science and engineering CC91 also defined computer science in terms of three processes nine fundamental subject areas twelve recurring concepts and a social and professional context 28 According to CC91 the three processes of computer science are defined as theory mathematical roots abstraction scientific roots design engineering roots The curriculum also included nine fundamental subject areas algorithms and

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/curriculum/cc91.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Teaching Tools References
    Computer Ethics Proceedings of the National Conference on Computing and Values New Haven CT 1991 D Gotterbarn R Riser Ethics Activities in Computer Science Courses Computers Society vol 26 no 3 1996 pp 13 17 A Hart Knowledge Acquisition for Expert Systems 2 nd Ed McGraw Hill New York 1992 J Herkert Making Connections Engineering Ethics on the World Wide Web presented in the session Ethics in the Engineering Curriculum at the Frontiers in Education Conference Salt Lake City Utah Nov 1996 Available at http wthics cwru edu essays connect html C W Huff Practical Guidance for Teaching the Social Impact Statement SIS in C Huff Ed Computers and the Quality of Life The Proceedings of the Symposium on Computers and the Quality of Life ACM Press New York Feb 1996 pp 86 89 C W Huff C D Martin Project ImpactCS Steering Committee Computing Consequences A Framework for Teaching Ethical Computing 1st report of the ImpactCS Steering Committee Communications of the ACM vol 38 1995 pp 75 84 C W Huff T Finholt Putting Technology in Its Place in Social Issues in Computing Putting Computers in Their Place eds C W Huff and T Finholt McGraw Hill New York 1994 pp 1 16 C W Huff T Finholt Social Issues in Computing Putting Computers in Their Place McGraw Hill New York 1994 C W Huff B Jawer Toward a Design Ethic for Computing Professionals in C Huff T Finholt eds Social Issues in Computing McGraw Hill New York 1994 pp 691 713 E Johnson Ethical and Professional Issues in Computing Abstract available at http www nsf gov cgi bin showaward award 9455149 D G Johnson Computer Ethics Prentice Hall Englewood Cliffs NJ 1994 D G Johnson Computer Ethics 3rd Edition Prentice Hall Englewood Cliffs NJ 1999 R Kling Computerization

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/teaching_with_cases/ttreferences.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Teaching Tools : ImpactCS
    computer science every ethical issue about a technology is located at a particular level of social analysis Ethical Issues Quality of Life Use of Power Risk and Reliability Property Rights Privacy Equity and Access Honesty and Deception Levels of Social Analysis Individual Group National Global Most of the standard topics that instructors already associate with the area will be found here The intersection of many topics are also suggested by this framework The framework will provide the sort of comprehensive conceptual overview that the field has been lacking until now Only an analysis that takes account of at least three levels of social analysis the individual the group and the national can adequately represent the issues as they concern computer science in practice For this reason careful attention to the individual the group and the national context is required for a good understanding of any issue Five fundamental Knowledge Units The Second ImpactCS report 27 produced a set of five knowledge units that allow different institutions and programs to package this subject matter in different ways A knowledge unit defines a collection of subject matter that is so fundamental to the designated subject area that it should occur in every undergraduate curriculum The five fundamental knowledge units of Ethical and Social Impact of Computing are Responsibility of the Computer Professional Basic Elements of Ethical Analysis Basic Skills of Ethical Analysis Basic Elements of Social Analysis Basic Skills of Social Analysis Top of Page A Graduated Approach to Learning The Third ImpactCSreport 28 suggests that a graduated approach to teaching the knowledge units is most productive In introductory computer science courses students are introduced to these issues and convinced of their complexity and importance In some programs this introduction may only be possible at the level of the user of a

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/curriculum/impactcs.html (2016-04-30)
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  • History of Social Impact Analysis
    Need to See Issues in Real World Problems The idea for including a Social Impact Analysis exercise in a class on social and ethical issues in computing came from a desire to have students see these issues as real problems that they will have to face in their careers With some guidance from the instructor students will have a chance to locate these problems within the complexity of the technical issues of the system SIA provides students with the skills of locating these issues and thinking carefully about their ethical import 22 18 Three Basic Tools for Investigating Students are trained in three basic tools to use in investigating the social context within which a system is used Interviewing Field Observation Day in the Life Scenarios Students are also guided by the instructor in identifying the stakeholders and ethical issues that are relevant for their particular implementation In doing this they use the framework from ImpactCS as a prompt in analyzing the ethical issues relevant at various social levels in the implementation Students Prepare a Professional Level Report for Clients Students search the literature based on the situation e g medical systems computer supported cooperative work computer aided manufacturing etc and on the ethical issues they have identified as relevant Students prepare a report for their client that includes an executive summary a description of the system physical logical procedural and social an analysis of the ethical issues stakeholders principles risks etc recommendations for actions with analysis of the possible outcomes a reader s guide to literature that will help the clients understand the issues in more depth an appendix that describes the methods they used to collect their data and prepare their analysis This list covers almost all of the curriculum knowledge units in the ImpactCS recommended curriculum It

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/sia/sia_history.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Socio-Technical System Main Page
    etc The person in charge of the microcomputers in our example above may have very different roles in the different socio technical systems and these different roles will bring with them different responsibilities and ethical issues Software and hardware designed assuming the kind of support one would find in a university environment may not match well with an elementary school or emergency room environment Procedures both official and actual management models reporting relationships documentation requirements data flow rules norms Procedures describe the way things are done in an organization or at least the official line regarding how they ought to be done Both the official rules and their actual implementation are important in understanding a socio technical system In addition there are norms about how things are done that allow organizations to work These norms may not be specified indeed it might be counter productive to specify them But those who understand them know how to for instance make complaints get a questionable part passed and find answers to technical questions Procedures are prime candidates to be encoded in software design Laws and regulations These also are procedures like those above but they carry special societal sanctions if the violators are caught They might be laws regarding the protection of privacy or regulations about the testing of chips in military use These societal laws and regulations might be in conflict with internal procedures and rules For instance some companies have implicit expectations that employees will share and probably copy commercial software Obviously these illegal expectations cannot be made explicit but they can be made known Data and data structures What data are collected how they are archived to whom they are made available and the formats in which they are stored are all decisions that go into the design of a socio technical system Data archiving in an emergency room it will be quite different from that in an insurance company and will be subject to different ethical issues too Top of Page Socio Technical Systems change over time So far we have been talking about differences between different socio technical systems In this section we address the changes that can occur over time within any particular socio technical system An STS is configurable in all its elements and this allows for change over time By configurable we mean that particular items in an STS can change over time and that even among those items the configuration of one element may change For instance the particular mix of hardware and software within an elementary school s computing lab may change as the school gets access to the internet or as more teachers begin to use the lab for their classes But this change might also be reflected in changes in procedure e g rules about access to certain sites and people someone may need to take the role of censor in approving or disproving sites and data downloaded software music cookies etc on the machines hard drives Change in an

    Original URL path: http://computingcases.org/general_tools/sia/socio_tech_system.html (2016-04-30)
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