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  • Rail | Conservation New Hampshire
    group is a broad based alliance of over 40 organizations including Conservation New Hampshire and several other state based organizations that recognize the importance of substantially reinvesting in passenger and freight rail in order to enhance New England s economy Read More Tags commuting New Hampshire rail Transportation 2 Comments Read the rest of this entry Search for Popular Posts LCHIP Announces 2010 Grant Recipients 2924 view s MacDowell Colony

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/tag/rail/ (2016-05-02)
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  • The Cost of Commuting | Conservation New Hampshire
    that these combined costs have significant effects on the household community and the environment According to the report residents in Southeast New Hampshire are spending well over 13 000 a year on transportation on average with residents of Portsmouth spending a whopping 14 428 Within the Boston region there are pockets where housing is affordable but transportation offsets those lower costs Many people in the workforce teachers nurses office workers are forced to spend precious time and money commuting from the homes they can afford to the places where they work said ULI Terwilliger Center Chairman J Ronald Terwilliger in a press release These findings reinforce that years of ever sprawling development have resulted in a growing gap between where people live and where they work The report also explores the significant impact this gap has on the environment The transportation sector is responsible for 41 of greenhouse gas emissions in the Boston region compared to 33 nationally The full report as well as additional information and resources can be found on the Boston Regional Challenge website Tags Climate Energy commuting Transportation Comment RSS Trackback Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Mail will not be published

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/transportation/the-cost-of-commuting/ (2016-05-02)
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  • No More Shellfish? | Conservation New Hampshire
    Ocean With the removal of this program these waters would not be monitored and the state would fail to comply with both federal and state food requirements Quite simply it would no longer be safe for anybody to eat the shellfish from New Hampshire s water Thus all shellfishing both for recreation and commercial use would need to be stopped Dismantling the Shellfish Program would effectively push all New Hampshire based shellfish companies out of business Additionally there would be both a loss of enjoyment from New Hampshire s residents as well as to the loss of income from license sales In fact it would cost the State over 78 000 just to close the program Closing the Shellfish Program would have further repercussions as well The State currently has a federal estuaries grant which helps aid in monitoring the State s declining water quality With the demolition of the Shellfish Program New Hampshire would no longer have the matching funds necessary to continue receiving the grant While the DES endorsed closing zero programs their list however was not limited to the Shellfish Program Other cuts included the State s Pollution Control Program and the Radon Program The Radon Program is responsible for limiting the State s second leading cause of lung cancer Eliminating the program would stop the DES from checking schools and individual homes for the presence of the harmful radon Even if all of the DES cuts took place the total savings Fiscal Year 2011 and Fiscal 2012 13 would only save a total slightly over three million dollars While this is a lot of money for an individual in the grand scheme of the State this figure is rather small The closing of these necessary DES programs however would have a large negative impact No matter

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/water/no-more-shellfish/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Economy | Conservation New Hampshire
    includes activities such as hiking visiting the beach or fishing Yet this year might be a little different for some Due to a potential cut in budget shellfishing may no longer be a New Hampshire Read More Tags budget economy NH DES ocean shellfish shellfishing Water 1 Comment Read the rest of this entry Search for Popular Posts LCHIP Announces 2010 Grant Recipients 2924 view s MacDowell Colony A Haven

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/tag/economy/ (2016-05-02)
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  • A Bunch of Hot Air, or Part of the Solution? | Conservation New Hampshire
    Steam s plant are sent to local farms Spreading wood ash on farmland adds important nutrients to the soil like phosphorous potassium and magnesium increasing crop production and helping farmers use less chemical fertilizers But what about greenhouse gases Whenever anything containing carbon plant matter like wood or coal or fossil fuels is burned it releases CO2 into the atmosphere which in turn traps heat causing Global Climate Change A recent study conducted by the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences found that generating electricity by burning wood does initially release more greenhouse gases than burning coal In the last few weeks these findings were reported with headlines like Wood Worse Than Coal damaging public opinion of biomass energy and companies like Concord Steam But according to Bloomfield and a followup statement by Manomet it is overly simplistic and misleading to say that burning wood is worse for the environment than burning coal Most notably CO2 gets reabsorbed by trees and the young growth encouraged by responsible wood harvesting practices absorbs more CO2 than older trees In terms of the environment it s certainly better than burning fossil fuel says Bloomfield Also In terms of employment it s better than burning fossil fuel While most coal comes from out of state and most fossil fuels from overseas the energy produced by Concord Steam is very local because the fuel the wood is from the immediate area Every year that wood replaces 12 million gallons of imported fossil fuels and puts more than 8 million into New Hampshire s forest industry Concord Steam also spends 200 000 a year on maintenance and repair materials from local companies And the company pays city taxes Money is basically spent in that thirty mile radius of Concord Bloomfield says Concord Steam does burn a small amount of fossil fuel but this is mainly low sulfur waste oil oil that has already been used to lubricate machinery and it is cleaned before being burned That white plume that s sometimes visible above the plant s smokestack is actually steam from the moisture in the burned wood The gases from the burned oil are cleaned up by pollution control equipment in accordance with the guidelines of the EPA and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services and as a result what does go into the air isn t visible To further reduce their emissions and to increase their efficiency Concord Steam has been trying to relocate to a larger site at the Concord Industrial Park on South Main St The planned facility would be the cleanest wood fired plant in New Hampshire with better equipment to monitor emissions Concord Steam would also take care not to take water from or discharge water into the nearby South End Marsh and the plans even include nature trails around the marsh Unfortunately these plans have been delayed as a result of the current economic situation To finance the new plant Concord Steam needs all of its electric output to be

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/land/a-bunch-of-hot-air-or-part-of-the-solution/ (2016-05-02)
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  • The Next Best Time to Plant a Tree: Deforestation in NH | Conservation New Hampshire
    England used to mark farmland boundaries Now most of them are swallowed up by the vast amounts of relatively young forests Unfortunately the forests of New Hampshire and the rest of New England are shrinking once again this time due to more permanent deforestation according to an important report recently released by Wildlands Woodlands The report names sprawling residential and commercial development as a leading cause of this recent decline Also contributing are adverse forest practices such as clear cutting and liquidation foresting where land is stripped of its lumber and then parceled off and sold as subdivisions Because so many of these forests are still young the effects can be especially damaging and the trees are often harvested well before they reach their full productive potential Another culprit is increased parcelization Over the years land tracts have become smaller and the number of landowners has increased This has led to what Wildlands Woodlands calls legal fragmentation Parcelization makes properly managing forests much more difficult increases the risk of deforestation and reduces public access to forests Despite the doom and gloom we can reverse the reversal of New England forest growth For example better planning the development of new homes and commercial buildings would be an admirable start We would be wise to emphasize better forest practices such as selective logging through which specialists determine which trees have reached their productive potential and can be cut down in a way that can actually benefit the forest as a whole through an attempt to mimic the natural process Wildlands Woodlands calls for New England to begin protecting much more of its forests to ensure that its forest cover does not drop below 70 This may seem radical to some but bear in mind that this leaves room for a doubling of

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/land/the-next-best-time-to-plant-a-tree-deforestation-in-nh/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Conservation | Conservation New Hampshire
    4 forest cover That s pretty cool However this probably comes as no surprise to anyone who lives here driving through most areas in New Hampshire is a matter of weaving through woods On clear summer days the state seems to light Read More Tags conservation deforestation forest forests preservation 1 Comment Read the rest of this entry Search for Popular Posts LCHIP Announces 2010 Grant Recipients 2924 view s

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/tag/conservation/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Deforestation | Conservation New Hampshire
    white mountains 1 Comment Read the rest of this entry The Next Best Time to Plant a Tree Deforestation in NH Posted on June 30 2010 by Nate Boesch New Hampshire is currently the second most forested state in the country trailing only Maine with 78 4 forest cover That s pretty cool However this probably comes as no surprise to anyone who lives here driving through most areas in

    Original URL path: http://conservationnh.org/tag/deforestation/ (2016-05-02)
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