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  • EVENT: 2013 Love the Land Calendar Launch November 18 | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    be awarded prizes calendars will be for sale and photos on display Photo Hiking at Uyarsivik Lake by Pinette Robinson Subscribe to news updates via RSS Events Looking for something to do Check our events section Get social Connect with CPAWS on the following sites Like CPAWS on Facebook What we do Boreal Caribou Love the Land NWT Protected Areas Strategy South Nahanni Watershed Thaidene Nene Events About CPAWS NWT

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/event-2013-love-the-land-calendar-launch (2016-02-14)
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  • EVENT: LKDFN hosts evening on Indigenous Conservation Leadership in Australia and Canada, October 30 | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    on indigenous knowledge and leadership in conservation management Please join us Subscribe to news updates via RSS Events Looking for something to do Check our events section Get social Connect with CPAWS on the following sites Like CPAWS on Facebook What we do Boreal Caribou Love the Land NWT Protected Areas Strategy South Nahanni Watershed Thaidene Nene Events About CPAWS NWT About Board of directors Contact us Resources Staff Successes

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/event-lkdfn-hosts-evening-on-indigenous-conservation-leadership-in-australi (2016-02-14)
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  • CPAWS-NWT 2012 AGM September 13th | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    work over the past year We welcome prospective Board members and all supporters of NWT conservation Call or email for more information 867 873 9893 or kris cpaws org Subscribe to news updates via RSS Events Looking for something to do Check our events section Get social Connect with CPAWS on the following sites Like CPAWS on Facebook What we do Boreal Caribou Love the Land NWT Protected Areas Strategy

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/cpaws-nwt-2012-agm (2016-02-14)
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  • Park Fails to protect, says wilderness group - Most important habitat outside park’s boundary | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    while still providing minimal protection of conservation values the information stated This option offers minimal protection to important conservation values Brekke said the goal when establishing a park such as Naats ihch oh should be to protect the area from development It doesn t make sense that in a national park potential industrial value is trumping the ecological value he said The area is also home to Dall sheep mountain goats and the Redstone mountain woodland caribou herd a species of special concern under the Federal Species at Risk Act NWT Premier Bob McLeod said the territory s process for developing parks and protected areas was followed That process was adhered to and everybody had input he said The process worked as envisaged McLeod said he believed the park s boundaries reflect a middle ground I think the balances have been struck between conservation and development he said Tom Hoefer executive director of the NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines said the chamber supported option three He said mineral extraction is vital to the territory s economy They re the backbone of our economy Hoefer said High mineral potential is also rare in the country and is worthy of protection You just don t find minerals that are economic to mine anywhere He said protecting land now prevents economic benefits later When a national park is created it transfers ownership of that land to the federal government forever he said It takes that land out of development opportunities forever Lands outside the park are still under the jurisdiction of the Sahtu Land Use Plan Hoefer said The plan which must be approved by the Sahtu Secretariat Incorporated and the territorial and federal governments will be reviewed every five years It s a locally based decision making process rather than giving the land back to the federal government he said Northerners will have the ability to decide if they want to develop lands anywhere in the area or not Rick Hardy is a Metis elder and the chief negotiator and legal adviser for the Tulita District Naats ihch oh Working Group He represented the Tulita Land Corporation the Fort Norman Metis Land Corporation the Norman Wells Land Corporation the Tulita Renewable Resources Council and the Norman Wells Renewable Resources Commission during the negotiation process He said focus should be directed toward the opportunities the park will now provide to members of the land corporations rather on disappointment with its boundaries There are employment opportunities he said There are I believe eight or nine full time jobs Our members will have the first opportunities to get those jobs Hardy said jobs will include positions required to manage the park Training opportunities including university education will ensure members get the qualifications they need to get hired Parks Canada also offers a 50 000 scholarship to members taking parks management programs at post secondary school Hardy added Hardy said despite federal cutbacks and hundreds of Parks Canada staff members losing their jobs across the

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/park-fails-to-protect-says-wilderness-group-most-important-habitat-outside (2016-02-14)
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  • New Nááts’ihch’oh leaves critical wildlife habitat and Nahanni tributaries unprotected | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    evidence of what s needed to protect the ecological integrity of the Nahanni watershed nor does it reflect the overwhelming support that was expressed for protecting the Nahanni headwaters during the public consultations Nááts ihch oh is an area of great ecological and cultural significance Located in the upper watershed or headwaters of the famed South Nahanni River watershed it lies upstream and adjacent to Nahanni National Park Reserve and World Heritage Site This area includes critical habitat for Nahanni and Redstone mountain woodland caribou herds as well as grizzly bears Dall s sheep and mountain goats The national park announced today leaves the most important habitat for these species outside the park CPAWS recognizes the years of work of the Sahtu Dene and Metis communities of Tulita and Norman Wells as well as Parks Canada to create this new national park said Kris Brekke Executive Director of CPAWS Northwest Territories Chapter We hope to continue to work together to achieve the goal of fully protecting the Nahanni watershed With the interest in resource development in Canada s North at an all time high protecting important ecological and cultural lands like Nááts ihch oh is more important than ever to safeguard our lands and waters and the wildlife and northern way of life they sustain notes Brekke CPAWS has worked for more than four decades to protect the Nahanni campaigning to secure the original Nahanni National Park Reserve in the early 1970s and decades later celebrating the Dehcho First Nations and Government of Canada s action to massively expand Nahanni National Park Reserve in 2009 For many years CPAWS has worked to secure the protection of the Nahanni headwaters 30 Read the backgrounder www cpaws org uploads Naatsihchoh Backgrounder pdf Click here to view the map of Nááts ihch oh

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/new-naatsihchoh-leaves-critical-wildlife-habitat-and-nahanni-tributaries-un (2016-02-14)
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  • Fisheries job cuts concern Yellowknifers | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    without that habitat protection provision only waterways deemed to be of economic cultural or recreational value are likely to be protected For the NWT this could mean rivers lakes and streams not commonly used by large numbers of people could be subject to development without any regulation he said So it s basically creating a hierarchy of our waters Brekke said The cuts coincided with changes to the Fisheries Act presented in the recently passed omnibus budget bill C 38 The modifications have been widely criticized by scientists and environmental activists alike We find it alarming said Ecology North spokesperson Christine Wenman The changes are weakening the legislation and we know from speaking to so many people in environmental regulation that that s really the one very effective tool that regulators have to ensure that project proponents are using land in the most responsible way Hill stated in an e mail however that changes to the Fisheries Act were needed and he expects their effect will be positive Previously a large part of the habitat management program s resources were used to advise proponents regarding the design of their development project in order to reduce impacts to fish and fish habitat he said These projects are often small and many of these pose minimal risk to fish and fish habitat Hill wrote Restructuring the program will involve taking steps to substantially reduce the thousands of reviews the department conducts through the establishment and communication of clear standards for the protection of fish and fish habitat The standards will allow proponents to have information on how they need to comply with the Fisheries Act in advance he said Also high risk projects will continue to be reviewed Still MLA Weledeh Bob Bromley is concerned It s putting large corporations even more

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/fisheries-job-cuts-concern-yellowknifers (2016-02-14)
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  • CPAWS-NWT Raises Concerns Over Prairie Creek Mine | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    scientists and technicians restoring and monitoring the ecological health of our parks have been fired or reassigned The cuts also mean many parks are cutting their seasons shorter opening the door to inappropriate use of them with no supervision Scrutiny is everywhere says Canadian Zinc manager Chris Reeves general manager with Canadian Zinc says he hears these types of concerns every day If there is another project more scrutinized than this I d like to see what it is he said Reeves was replying to a written Failure to Comply Order issued by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada AANDC on July 5 in relation to the Prairie Creek Mine s drilling program at Casket Creek A drill located at Casket Creek eight kilometres from the mine was inspected and the set up for the sump water for the drill was moved It s a depression in the ground so heavy solids fall to the bottom and she AANDC inspector Laurie Ozman wanted to have it changed said Reeves We moved it so that it is now 100 metres away from any water She went out two days after and approved he said We are required to have monitoring with our Aboriginal partners and the territorial government said Reeves adding that he believes the company has good relationships with First Nations groups within the region Scott Stewart departmental spokesperson for AANDC confirmed a department inspector recently undertaking an inspection of Prairie Creek s drill program noticed a sump depression was overflowing to a creek in the area She asked that they cease the operation They immediately complied with the verbal order and she followed up in writing on July 5 he said They drafted an action plan and implemented it by July 6 She verified the action plan and will go over it again on July 26 Stewart added that this is an uncommon occurrence and the first noncompliance order issued to Prairie Creek in quite some time To my knowledge there hasn t been a noncompliance order issued to them within the last five years Stewart said AANDC is responsible for monitoring water licenses and land use permits Staff affected monitoring not says Parks superintendent Brian Reader Parks Canada s acting field unit superintendent in the southwestern Northwest Territories including Nahanni and Wood Buffalo National Parks wouldn t confirm the exact number of cuts countrywide but admitted budget 2012 impacted staff at Nahanni The total loss at Nahanni National Park would be equal to one and three quarters full time equivalent positions of our staff complement over four full time equivalent positions said Reader The prominent feature of the cutbacks is seasonality of operation said Reader In our case it s a short summer season and visitors tend to congregate mostly in July and August and so we re focusing resources during that time It doesn t necessarily mean it s just a summer operation said Reader Throughout Reader s field unit 12 full time equivalent positions were eliminated

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/cpaws-nwt-raises-concerns-over-prairie-creek-mine (2016-02-14)
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  • Fisheries Act and DFO Diminished by Removal of Habitat Protections | CPAWS Northwest Territories
    the elimination of more than a 1 3 of DFO s habitat staff whose jobs are to mitigate impacts from development projects monitor habitat health and support habitat restoration projects Across Canada more than half of the habitat protection offices are being closed and a large number of committed and experienced fish habitat scientists are being laid off Our Fisheries Act previously protected fish habitat from harmful alteration disruption or destruction Now it will only protect fish from serious harm defined as death if the species is proven to be part of a commercial recreational or Aboriginal fishery Furthermore our Fisheries Minister will have the power to override this weak protection by exempting works undertakings activities or even water bodies from regulation if he or she sees fit It is absurd to believe that fish or other aquatic species can be protected without protection of their habitat These legislative and program changes completely overlook the fact that aquatic ecosystems are complex inter related and sensitive to disturbance It is incredibly disturbing that the Act now allows the responsible Minister to exempt activities or waterways from any regulation as he or she sees fit The Fisheries Act was our one of our strongest tools to protect our right to clean water and sustainable aquatic ecosystems The Act has now been substantially weakened and with concurrent cuts to staff and programming leaves our aquatic environments and fish populations across Canada with wholly inadequate and arbitrary protection CPAWS NWT calls upon all citizens to express their concern about these legislative and programming changes to their members of Parliament and territorial provincial MLAs to ensure that all levels of government and other agencies take the steps necessary to reinvigorate the Fisheries Act and re strengthen our ability to protect and preserve our healthy and

    Original URL path: http://cpawsnwt.org/news/fisheries-act-and-dfo-diminished-by-removal-of-habitat-protections (2016-02-14)
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