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  • Concepts << CPN Tools Homepage
    book Book creator Remove this page from your book Show modify book 30 page s Help Concepts Colored nets Declarations Inscriptions and expressions Multisets External Communication and Libraries Animations and vizualisation with BRITNeY Suite Connection management functions DTD for net files Comms CPN Connecting to Webservices from CPN Tools Hierarchy Bottom up development Fusion places Limitations Redo Undo Hierarchy tags Inscriptions in hierarchical nets Removing hierarchical constructs Substitution transitions Top

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/concepts/start?do=addtobook (2016-04-26)
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  • Concepts << CPN Tools Homepage
    CPN Knowledge Base Licensing Support Contact Publications Loading Home Download Getting Started Documentation Support Contact This page is read only You can view the source but not change it Ask your administrator if you think this is wrong Concepts indexmenu

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/concepts/start?do=edit&rev= (2016-04-26)
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  • Overview of a net << CPN Tools Homepage
    the current model time Options net specific options History A list of the commands that have been executed Declarations the declarations of color sets functions constant values etc All declarations are written in the CPN ML language Monitors the monitor index entries for the net Page entries for pages in the net Color coded auras around entries such as the green aura next to the Top entry above under a net overview provide various different kinds of information regarding the net For more information about auras please read about Graphical feedback Options The Options index entry in a net overview provides an overview of the options that are related to a particular net Output directory The Output directory option determines where various kinds of output files will be saved The default output directory is indicated by the text same as model but the default output directory is actually model dir output where model dir is the directory in which the model is saved To change the output directory for a net edit the text of the option The output directory can be specified either as a relative path e g simoutput or an absolute path e g C Documents and Settings userx If a relative path is used it will be interpreted as relative to the directory where the model is saved The Output directory marking menu can be used to specify absolute paths Performance report statistics The Performance report statistics options are used to determine which statistics should be included in different kinds of performance output A check mark next to a statistic indicates that the statistic will be included in the appropriate report The Simulation performance report options are used to select the statistics to be included in simulation performance reports The Replication performance report options are used

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/gui/index/net_overviews (2016-04-26)
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  • Example nets << CPN Tools Homepage
    Distributed database example Ring protocol example Telephone example Simple protocols Simple protocol example Timed protocol example Hierarchical protocol example Protocol with timer State space analysis examples Resource allocation Distributed database Dining philosophers Simple protocol Monitoring examples Dining philosophers monitored Queue system example Queue system configuration Real life examples If you use either of the below models for research please refer to the papers listed for each model We list models

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/examples/start (2016-04-26)
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  • Timed Nets << CPN Tools Homepage
    A timed token is not available for any purpose whatever unless the clock time is greater than or equal to the token s time stamp When there are no enabled transitions but there would be if the clock had a greater value the simulator increments the clock by the minimum amount necessary to enable at least one transition How simulated time works Simulated time has nothing to do with the external time during which the simulator steps through net execution and observers possibly watch the execution process or with the numbered sequence of steps by which the simulator executes a net Simulated time is just an incrementable number that is globally available within an executing model The value of this number can be thought of as the time indicated by a simulated clock When the number is incremented the clock moves forward to a later time The units of simulated time do not inherently represent any particular absolute time unit We may interpret simulated time units as microseconds or millennia depending on what we are modeling but syntactically time is just a number For brevity simulated time is sometimes referred to as model time Simulated time and transition enabledness The state of a net changes only when enabled transitions fire In order for simulated time to affect net execution it must affect transition enabledness and firing This effect is produced by the rule that a timed token is unavailable for any purpose unless the clock is greater than or equal to the token s time stamp Such a token is ignored when transitions are checked for enablement the token might as well not be there at all In effect a timed token does not exist until the clock reaches a creation time given by the token s time stamp When

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/concepts/time/start?do=addtobook (2016-04-26)
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  • Timed Nets << CPN Tools Homepage
    index entries In the example below the current simulation time is 136 documentation currentsimulationtime jpg Current simulation time A timed token is not available for any purpose whatever unless the clock time is greater than or equal to the token s time stamp When there are no enabled transitions but there would be if the clock had a greater value the simulator increments the clock by the minimum amount necessary to enable at least one transition How simulated time works Simulated time has nothing to do with the external time during which the simulator steps through net execution and observers possibly watch the execution process or with the numbered sequence of steps by which the simulator executes a net Simulated time is just an incrementable number that is globally available within an executing model The value of this number can be thought of as the time indicated by a simulated clock When the number is incremented the clock moves forward to a later time The units of simulated time do not inherently represent any particular absolute time unit We may interpret simulated time units as microseconds or millennia depending on what we are modeling but syntactically time is just a number For brevity simulated time is sometimes referred to as model time Simulated time and transition enabledness The state of a net changes only when enabled transitions fire In order for simulated time to affect net execution it must affect transition enabledness and firing This effect is produced by the rule that a timed token is unavailable for any purpose unless the clock is greater than or equal to the token s time stamp Such a token is ignored when transitions are checked for enablement the token might as well not be there at all In effect a timed token

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/concepts/time/start?do=edit&rev= (2016-04-26)
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  • Hierarchy << CPN Tools Homepage
    semantic meaning Subpages and superpages A page that contains a substitution transition is called a superpage The page named Top in the figure above is a superpage When a CP net uses a substitution transition the logic that the transition represents must be kept somewhere It is kept on a page called a subpage and the logic on the subpage is called a subnet or a submodel The page named Reverse is the subpage associated with the substitution transition Reverse Each substitution transition is said to be a supernode of the corresponding subpage The hierarchical structure of a net i e the relationships between subpages and superpages is shown in the index entry for the overview of the net The name of a subpage is always shown below the name of its superpage and the name of the subpage is always indented with respect to the name of the superpage If a subpage name is not visible in the index click on the blue arrow next to the superpage to unfold its list of subpages Ports and sockets Superpages and subpages are connected by equating places on the two pages using special purpose fusion sets These special fusion sets always contain only two places A place that belongs to such a fusion set is called a port if it is on a subpage and a socket if it is on a superpage Sockets A socket is a place that is a neighbor to a substitution transition i e there is always at least one arc between a substitution transition and a socket Places Begin and End on page Top are sockets Ports A port type tag is associated with each port on a subpage Places Begin and End on page Reverse are ports There are three kinds of port type tags In tags Out tags and I O tags Port Socket assignments Port socket assignments are used to define how a subpage should be glued together with the surroundings of its supernode Each socket must be assigned to a port on the corresponding subpage A port with an In tag must be assigned to a socket which is an input node and not an output node of the substitution transition Analogously an Out tag indicates that the port must be related to a socket which is an output node and not an input node while an I O tag indicates that the socket must be both an input and output node Note that the arcs surrounding a port do not have to correspond to the port type tag For example there may be arcs from a transition to a port that has an In tag i e the port may be an output node for a transition on the subpage even though it has an In tag To learn about how port socket assignments are indicated read about the graphical feedback for port type tags Markings of ports and sockets Tokens that are present on a socket in a superpage

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/concepts/hierarchy/start?do=addtobook (2016-04-26)
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  • Hierarchy << CPN Tools Homepage
    a substitution transition is called a superpage The page named Top in the figure above is a superpage When a CP net uses a substitution transition the logic that the transition represents must be kept somewhere It is kept on a page called a subpage and the logic on the subpage is called a subnet or a submodel The page named Reverse is the subpage associated with the substitution transition Reverse documentation subpage jpg A subpage Each substitution transition is said to be a supernode of the corresponding subpage The hierarchical structure of a net i e the relationships between subpages and superpages is shown in the index entry for the gui index net overviews overview of the net The name of a subpage is always shown below the name of its superpage and the name of the subpage is always indented with respect to the name of the superpage documentation hierarchicalstructure jpg Hierarchical structure If a subpage name is not visible in the index click on the blue arrow next to the superpage to unfold its list of subpages Ports and sockets Superpages and subpages are connected by equating places on the two pages using special purpose fusion places fusion sets These special fusion sets always contain only two places A place that belongs to such a fusion set is called a port if it is on a subpage and a socket if it is on a superpage Sockets A socket is a place that is a neighbor to a substitution transition i e there is always at least one arc between a substitution transition and a socket Places Begin and End on page Top are sockets documentation superpage jpg Two sockets Ports A hierarchy tags port type tag is associated with each port on a subpage Places Begin and End on page Reverse are ports documentation port jpg A port There are three kinds of port type tags In tags Out tags and I O tags Port Socket assignments Port socket assignments are used to define how a subpage should be glued together with the surroundings of its supernode Each socket must be assigned to a port on the corresponding subpage A port with an In tag must be assigned to a socket which is an input node and not an output node of the substitution transition Analogously an Out tag indicates that the port must be related to a socket which is an output node and not an input node while an I O tag indicates that the socket must be both an input and output node Note that the arcs surrounding a port do not have to correspond to the port type tag For example there may be arcs from a transition to a port that has an In tag i e the port may be an output node for a transition on the subpage even though it has an In tag To learn about how port socket assignments are indicated read about the hierarchy tags

    Original URL path: http://cpntools.org/documentation/concepts/hierarchy/start?do=edit&rev= (2016-04-26)
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