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  • Cities of the Arab East » CSBE
    Underpasses Everywhere Fixing Sweifieh Urban Solutions Easier Said than Done Amman s Urban Fabric What Went Wrong Energy Consumption in the City Sweifieh A Case of Urban Deterioration The Growth of Buildings A Tale of Two Shops The Economics of Zoning Jabal Amman s First Circle Area Nooks and Crannies Surfaces of the City Concrete Signs of the City Empty Plots Everywhere Amman s Most Beautiful District Amman Street Maps A New Frontier Soundscapes of Amman Airport Road Parking in Amman Privilege or Right Time Zoning To Commute or Telecommute The Shopping Mall Apartment Living Sidewalks of Amman Riyadh Property Rental Laws Beirut Public Transportation Cities of the Arab East Zoning Urban Sprawl The Domination of Amman Introduction An Anatomy of the City Using Public Transportation in Amman Publications Resources Urban Crossroads Cities of the Arab East Cities of the Arab East Urban Crossroads 5 View of a street in Dubai The Jordan Times The Arab East is a region of great historical cities These include some of the world s earliest human settlements as well as some of the most prominent political cultural and commercial urban centers of the Middle Ages The fortunes of the cities of the region have changed considerably through the ages I would like to provide a quick overview of their development over the past half century During the 1950s the position of urban prominence in the region clearly went to Cairo Its physical composition and its institutions provided models to be emulated Beirut also was of importance as a cosmopolitan center that linked the region to various parts of the world Of course there also were Damascus and Baghdad both capitals of newly independent countries that were asserting themselves as centers of urban life With the exception of Beirut which only began to emerge as an important urban center during the mid nineteenth century these cities served as capitals of great states during the Middle Ages Damascus was the capital of the Umayyads Baghdad of the Abbasids and Cairo of the Fatimids and later the Ayyubids and Mamluks The fortunes of these cities have changed considerably during the past half a century The 1970s provide an important turning point Cairo for example lost much of its prominence during this period This partly has been a result of the tremendous demographic pressures to which it has been subjected These pressures have put considerable strain on the city and its resources and have made it increasingly difficult for Cairo to serve as a model to be followed Beirut was effectively marginalized as a regional center as a result of the Lebanese civil war which extended from 1975 to 1990 Baghdad and Damascus also lost a good deal of regional prominence partly because of governmental policies in their respective countries that restricted interaction between those countries and the outside world The cities of the oil rich Gulf region gradually have taken a more prominent position in the area since the 1970s specially with the dramatic rise of

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/urban-crossroads/cities-of-the-arab-east/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Zoning » CSBE
    Searching for the Inoffensive Gas Station Sweifieh Revisited Model Streets To Centralize or Decentralize Educating Architects and Planners What If Ever growing Amman Exploring the Early Islamic City Rehabilitating Old Aleppo The Landscaping Challenge If You Can t Maintain It Don t Build It Disposable Buildings Buy Now Pay Later Taking the Bus The Street Where I Live City Infrastructure Underpasses Everywhere Fixing Sweifieh Urban Solutions Easier Said than Done Amman s Urban Fabric What Went Wrong Energy Consumption in the City Sweifieh A Case of Urban Deterioration The Growth of Buildings A Tale of Two Shops The Economics of Zoning Jabal Amman s First Circle Area Nooks and Crannies Surfaces of the City Concrete Signs of the City Empty Plots Everywhere Amman s Most Beautiful District Amman Street Maps A New Frontier Soundscapes of Amman Airport Road Parking in Amman Privilege or Right Time Zoning To Commute or Telecommute The Shopping Mall Apartment Living Sidewalks of Amman Riyadh Property Rental Laws Beirut Public Transportation Cities of the Arab East Zoning Urban Sprawl The Domination of Amman Introduction An Anatomy of the City Using Public Transportation in Amman Publications Resources Urban Crossroads Zoning Zoning Urban Crossroads 4 A multiuse neighborhood in Aix en Provence France that houses shopping residential and office functions Mohammad al Asad Zoning policies define admissible land uses in the city The main idea behind zoning is the separation of incompatible activities Among other things it aims at preventing nightmare scenarios such as having a chemical factory located next to a kindergarten Classic single use zoning practices are based on placing differing activities in separate parts of the city Therefore the city would have areas designated almost exclusively as residential commercial industrial cultural institutional etc The logic behind single use zoning is that certain activities cause considerable traffic pollution or noise and therefore should be kept away from ones that do not However single use zoning policies although still predominant have come under considerable criticism They result in having sections of the city being used only during certain hours For example residential areas would become almost deserted during much of the day as most of their inhabitants go off to work or school On the other hand areas primarily consisting of offices would become deserted by the evening when people return to their homes Also single use zoning creates zones that are at a distance from each other and as a result considerable time and fuel is spent as people drive or are being driven from one zone to the other Multi use zoning has been put forward as a healthier alternative for the city Accordingly different activities are allowed to exist in the same area provided certain requirements are met which is why multi use zoning also may be referred to as performance zoning For example a commercial enterprise would be allowed in a residential area as long as it satisfies certain often strict requirements such as providing enough off street parking and not causing high

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/urban-crossroads/zoning/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Urban Sprawl » CSBE
    and Daily Stress Sharing the Road Where Should All the Garbage Go Smart Growth Desperately Seeking Amman The Urban Planning Moment Zero Tolerance The Demands of the Few and the Rights of the Many Staking Territory Goodbye Nature Have To vs Want To Whose Street is it Anyway What Happened in my Neighborhooud Exploring a Traffic Intersection Building Communities Moving Around Amman Moving Around the City Searching for the Inoffensive Gas Station Sweifieh Revisited Model Streets To Centralize or Decentralize Educating Architects and Planners What If Ever growing Amman Exploring the Early Islamic City Rehabilitating Old Aleppo The Landscaping Challenge If You Can t Maintain It Don t Build It Disposable Buildings Buy Now Pay Later Taking the Bus The Street Where I Live City Infrastructure Underpasses Everywhere Fixing Sweifieh Urban Solutions Easier Said than Done Amman s Urban Fabric What Went Wrong Energy Consumption in the City Sweifieh A Case of Urban Deterioration The Growth of Buildings A Tale of Two Shops The Economics of Zoning Jabal Amman s First Circle Area Nooks and Crannies Surfaces of the City Concrete Signs of the City Empty Plots Everywhere Amman s Most Beautiful District Amman Street Maps A New Frontier Soundscapes of Amman Airport Road Parking in Amman Privilege or Right Time Zoning To Commute or Telecommute The Shopping Mall Apartment Living Sidewalks of Amman Riyadh Property Rental Laws Beirut Public Transportation Cities of the Arab East Zoning Urban Sprawl The Domination of Amman Introduction An Anatomy of the City Using Public Transportation in Amman Publications Resources Urban Crossroads Urban Sprawl Urban Sprawl Urban Crossroads 3 I have heard from more than one source that a group of foreign urban planning specialists who visited Amman during the 1950s expressed concern regarding Amman s fast rate of growth They warned that if such growth were left unchecked it would engulf a number of then independent towns and villages such as Sweileh Wadi al Sir and Jubeihah and would destroy the agricultural land and natural landscapes located between them and Amman Accordingly they recommended that green belts be zoned between Amman and those towns Obviously their recommendations were totally ignored and Amman succumbed to that nasty urban ailment known as urban sprawl Urban sprawl is defined as haphazard growth resulting from real estate development at the outskirts of the city It very much is a result of the automobile age Before then a city could only grow so much before distances between its inner and outer parts became prohibitively lengthy to cover With the advent of the automobile there ain t no distance long enough and urban centers may extend almost indefinitely Urban sprawl often begins along the roads or highways connecting human settlements to each other and eventually creates a continuous link between them This kind of growth is economically feasible since these roads or highways usually bring with them additional forms of infrastructure including electricity and telephone lines However it unfortunately also destroys the agricultural land and natural landscapes located along

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/urban-crossroads/urban-sprawl/ (2016-02-13)
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  • The Domination of Amman » CSBE
    Stool To Kill the Goose that Lays the Golden Egg The Trans Jordan Trail The Dubai Model Urban Planning and Daily Stress Sharing the Road Where Should All the Garbage Go Smart Growth Desperately Seeking Amman The Urban Planning Moment Zero Tolerance The Demands of the Few and the Rights of the Many Staking Territory Goodbye Nature Have To vs Want To Whose Street is it Anyway What Happened in my Neighborhooud Exploring a Traffic Intersection Building Communities Moving Around Amman Moving Around the City Searching for the Inoffensive Gas Station Sweifieh Revisited Model Streets To Centralize or Decentralize Educating Architects and Planners What If Ever growing Amman Exploring the Early Islamic City Rehabilitating Old Aleppo The Landscaping Challenge If You Can t Maintain It Don t Build It Disposable Buildings Buy Now Pay Later Taking the Bus The Street Where I Live City Infrastructure Underpasses Everywhere Fixing Sweifieh Urban Solutions Easier Said than Done Amman s Urban Fabric What Went Wrong Energy Consumption in the City Sweifieh A Case of Urban Deterioration The Growth of Buildings A Tale of Two Shops The Economics of Zoning Jabal Amman s First Circle Area Nooks and Crannies Surfaces of the City Concrete Signs of the City Empty Plots Everywhere Amman s Most Beautiful District Amman Street Maps A New Frontier Soundscapes of Amman Airport Road Parking in Amman Privilege or Right Time Zoning To Commute or Telecommute The Shopping Mall Apartment Living Sidewalks of Amman Riyadh Property Rental Laws Beirut Public Transportation Cities of the Arab East Zoning Urban Sprawl The Domination of Amman Introduction An Anatomy of the City Using Public Transportation in Amman Publications Resources Urban Crossroads The Domination of Amman The Domination of Amman Urban Crossroads 2 Amman is Jordan s dominant urban center Not only is it the country s most populous city but also its political economic and cultural capital Although it has about 40 of the country s population it probably is responsible for about 70 of the country s economic activity It may be argued that a small country with limited resources such as Jordan cannot afford more than one major urban center which usually attracts a significant portion of a country s investments and its human talent Moreover although Amman is incredibly large within the context of Jordan there are many larger cities in the world that function perfectly well and the size of Amman is still acceptable and manageable However considering Amman s fast rate of growth there is no guarantee that it will remain as such Still it is undesirable for one city to occupy such a dominant role in the life of any country as is prevalent throughout the developing world The dominant city tends to attract disproportionate levels of economic and cultural resources thus diverting them from other locations This negatively influences the quality of life in other parts of the country Also the dominant city usually is subjected to excessive demographic and infrastructure pressures as the rural and urban

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/urban-crossroads/the-domination-of-amman/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Introduction: An Anatomy of the City » CSBE
    Energies A New Amman for Better and for Worse Bottom Up Urban Development Urban Life and Rising Commodity Prices Urban Change Management and Resistance Architecture for the Rich Mere Shelter for the Poor Celebrating Water Wakalat Street Again The Amman Report Card Architecture Serving Humanity The Winning Projects of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture Managing Amman s Traffic Cairo A Ray of Hope To Tax or Not To Tax Amman s Empty Land Plots The Municipal Three Legged Stool To Kill the Goose that Lays the Golden Egg The Trans Jordan Trail The Dubai Model Urban Planning and Daily Stress Sharing the Road Where Should All the Garbage Go Smart Growth Desperately Seeking Amman The Urban Planning Moment Zero Tolerance The Demands of the Few and the Rights of the Many Staking Territory Goodbye Nature Have To vs Want To Whose Street is it Anyway What Happened in my Neighborhooud Exploring a Traffic Intersection Building Communities Moving Around Amman Moving Around the City Searching for the Inoffensive Gas Station Sweifieh Revisited Model Streets To Centralize or Decentralize Educating Architects and Planners What If Ever growing Amman Exploring the Early Islamic City Rehabilitating Old Aleppo The Landscaping Challenge If You Can t Maintain It Don t Build It Disposable Buildings Buy Now Pay Later Taking the Bus The Street Where I Live City Infrastructure Underpasses Everywhere Fixing Sweifieh Urban Solutions Easier Said than Done Amman s Urban Fabric What Went Wrong Energy Consumption in the City Sweifieh A Case of Urban Deterioration The Growth of Buildings A Tale of Two Shops The Economics of Zoning Jabal Amman s First Circle Area Nooks and Crannies Surfaces of the City Concrete Signs of the City Empty Plots Everywhere Amman s Most Beautiful District Amman Street Maps A New Frontier Soundscapes of Amman Airport Road Parking in Amman Privilege or Right Time Zoning To Commute or Telecommute The Shopping Mall Apartment Living Sidewalks of Amman Riyadh Property Rental Laws Beirut Public Transportation Cities of the Arab East Zoning Urban Sprawl The Domination of Amman Introduction An Anatomy of the City Using Public Transportation in Amman Publications Resources Urban Crossroads Introduction An Anatomy of the City Introduction An Anatomy of the City Urban Crossroads 1 This column Urban Crossroads is about cities particularly Amman It is about what makes a city an agreeable or disagreeable place in which to live Since this is the introductory article of Urban Crossroads it is suitable to devote it to defining what I mean by city By doing this I might be criticized for stating the obvious However what is defined as the obvious often differs from one person to the other Clearly a city consists of buildings residential single family residences duplexes apartment buildings commercial malls office buildings street front shops institutional schools governmental buildings hospitals cultural public places of worship museums theaters and industrial Some buildings of course house more than one of these functions The various buildings of the city include the small and the

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/urban-crossroads/introduction-an-anatomy-of-the-city/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Unnecessary Trips (Arabic) » CSBE
    Revisited Model Streets To Centralize or Decentralize Educating Architects and Planners What If Ever growing Amman Exploring the Early Islamic City Rehabilitating Old Aleppo The Landscaping Challenge If You Can t Maintain It Don t Build It Disposable Buildings Buy Now Pay Later Taking the Bus The Street Where I Live City Infrastructure Underpasses Everywhere Fixing Sweifieh Urban Solutions Easier Said than Done Amman s Urban Fabric What Went Wrong Energy Consumption in the City Sweifieh A Case of Urban Deterioration The Growth of Buildings A Tale of Two Shops The Economics of Zoning Jabal Amman s First Circle Area Nooks and Crannies Surfaces of the City Concrete Signs of the City Empty Plots Everywhere Amman s Most Beautiful District Amman Street Maps A New Frontier Soundscapes of Amman Airport Road Parking in Amman Privilege or Right Time Zoning To Commute or Telecommute The Shopping Mall Apartment Living Sidewalks of Amman Riyadh Property Rental Laws Beirut Public Transportation Cities of the Arab East Zoning Urban Sprawl The Domination of Amman Introduction An Anatomy of the City Using Public Transportation in Amman Publications Resources Urban Crossroads Unnecessary Trips also available in Arabic Unnecessary Trips Arabic رحلات غير ضرورية في المدينة كنت قد كتبت قبل حوالي الأربع سنوات مقالة في سلسلة المقالات هذه عنوانها رحلات كثيرة وقصيرة ناقشت فيها العلاقة الواضحة والمباشرة بين الإكتظاظ المروري والرحلات غير الضرورية التي نقوم بها بسياراتنا وقد ذكرتني عملية معادلة شهادة إبنتي المدرسية التي قمت بها في الماضي القريب بأهمية هذه العلاقة أعلمتنا مدرسة إبنتي بأنه علينا أن نبدأ العملية في قسم لوزارة التربية والتعليم في منطقة جبل الحسين في عم ان حيث يتم تصديق الشهادات المدرسية وقد استغرقت الرحلة من منزلي إلى جبل الحسين ما يقارب نصف ساعة كانت عملية التصديق هناك سلسة واستغرقت ما يقارب 45 دقيقة وذهبت بعد ذلك إلى قسم آخر للوزارة في منطقة جبل اللويبدة حيث تتم عملية إنهاء المعاملة وقد استغرقت الرحلة إلى جبل اللويبدة حوالي نصف ساعة أيضا ولكنني علمت بعد وصولي هناك أنني لم أحضر جميع الوثائق المطلوبة بالرغم من أنني أحضرت كل الوثائق التي حددتها مدرسة إبنتي ولذلك عدت إلى المنزل وقد استغرقت رحلة العودة حوالي نصف ساعة وعدت إلى جبل اللويبدة في اليوم التالي بعد التأكد من إحضار جميع الوثائق المطلوبة واستغرقت الرحلة حوالي نصف ساعة وقضيت ما يقارب ساعة ونصف الساعة في قسم وزارة التربية هناك حتى أنهيت المعاملة وحصلت على شهادة المعادلة ومن ثم عدت إلى المنزل واستغرقت رحلة العودة حوالي نصف ساعة وجدت خلال القيام بعملية التصديق والمعادلة هذه أن موظفي الوزارة يتعاملون مع المراجعين بلطف وإحترام ولكن تعليمات عملية التصديق والمعادلة لم تكن واضحة كل الوضوح كذلك فإنني أتوقع أنني ذهبت من مكتب إلى الآخر في البنايتين أكثر من 15 مرة لتوقيع أوراق أو ختمها أو لدفع رسوم ولا أدري سبب هذا التنقل بين المكاتب ومن الواضح أنه يمكن إختزال عملية التصديق والمعادلة بشكل كبير بحيث يمكن إنهاء العملية كلها بوقت وبجهد أقل مما هو الحال الآن ولكن ما أود أن أناقشه ببعض التفصيل هنا ليس الوقت والجهد الضائع الذي يبذله الم راجع في إتمام هذه المعاملات ولكن الوقت الذي قضيته في

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/urban-crossroads/unnecessary-trips-also-available-in-arabic/unnecessary-trips-arabic/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Unnecessary Trips » CSBE
    Box 830751 Amman 11183 Jordan Telefax 962 6 461 5297 Email us Read more about Contact Us Activities Read more about Activities Architectural Competitions Architectural Competitions Read more about Architectural Competitions Courses Workshops Courses and Workshops Read more about Courses Workshops Publications Resources Read more about Publications Resources Mission Statement CSBE Mission Statement Read more about Mission Statement Board of Directors Read more about Board of Directors Current Staff Read

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  • The Seven » CSBE
    low water using It does not mean dry or barren looking Applying the seven principles of xeriscape enables you to use natives and non native drought tolerant plants for lovely colorful and shady outdoor spaces around your home Xeriscape s seven principles are Water wise Planning and Design Begin by making a plan for your site Determine how you intend to use areas around your home Identify shady and sunny areas sloped and flat areas and how air moves on your site Next divide your property into oasis type moderate and low water use areas The Oasis area should be next to your house where use is the most intense to provide shade and coolness as well as aesthetic appeal The lowest water use area will probably be at the outer edge of your property and may include native plants already growing on the site Once the plants in this zone are established they need little or no water The middle zone is a transition zone between the other two areas and uses a moderate amount of water Plants that have a similar need for water sun and maintenance should be grouped together to increase irrigation efficiency and reduce maintenance time Low water Using Plants There are plenty of plants that use little water figure 1 A wide selection of such plants is provided in the plant lists included in this web site Tree selection is very important because trees can provide you with years of luscious shade They can be chosen and located to provide shade to your home in summer months and allow the winter sun in Use groundcovers and wildflowers to add color and texture in your landscape and use shrubs for accent or as a screen for privacy Take the time to look at good xeriscape

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/articles-and-lectures-on-landscape-design/material-on-water-conserving-landscapes/the-seven-principles-of-xeriscape/ (2016-02-13)
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