archive-org.com » ORG » C » CSBE.ORG

Total: 693

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Sahab Playground Project Page 9 » CSBE
    and children One of the center s services is hosting a children s club that organizes a wide range of activities for the children 3 50 children were affiliated with the children s club during the summer of 2000 30 children 5 boys and 25 girls mainly consisting of those who live near PBC were invited by the center to attend the meetings of the first phase of the project which extended from September 29 to November 25 2000 Of the children 5 were between 6 and 8 years of age 12 between 9 and 11 years and 12 between 12 and 14 years More children joined the meetings of the second phase of the project as the children of Sahab became more familiar with our project through their friends and relatives who participated in the first phase The second phase extended from April 28 to June 2 2001 It started with 47 children 19 girls and 28 boys attending the meetings and the number sometimes reached more than 60 38 of them joined the design team of whom 15 were girls 15 were between 9 and 11 years of age 19 were between 12 and 14 years 3 were above 14 years and 1 was 8 years old 4 The Near East Foundation is a private nonprofit development agency established in 1915 For additional information about the organization see their web site at www neareast org The web site also features information on the Sahab children s play environment project which can be viewed in the Cans for Kids section of the site 5 See Diana Omet Tasmim bi at lu b al atfal Design of Children s Play Environments Master s thesis University of Jordan 2000 Click here to view the abstract of the thesis 6 The concept of play has been categorized in a variety of ways by various offers I find Mary Sheradin s categorization of the types of play very useful in designing play environments for children Sheradin adopts the traditional six classifications of main types of play for young children and also adds a seventh category relating to older children and adults Her categorization of play is as follows Active play presumes gross motor control of the head trunk and limbs It later develops to include activities such as sitting standing running climbing jumping throwing kicking and catching Exploratory and manipulative play begins at about 3 months of age with finger play and manipulation of domestic objects that the child finds around him or her Imitative play becomes clearly evident from 7 to 9 months of age The child imitates functional activities that are repeated regularly by the people around him or her Constructive play or end product play begins at about 18 to 20 months of age and includes all play activities for which the child intentionally presents an end product Examples include cut and paste activities playing with clay and painting Make believe or pretend play begins at about 22 months of

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/articles-and-lectures-on-landscape-design/other-material-on-landscape-design/designing-a-play-environment-with-children-at-sahab/sahab-playground-project-page-10/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sahab Playground Project page 10 » CSBE
    Child s Play Landscape Architecture April 1996 28 32 Khawaldah Muhammad Al lu b al sha bi ind al atfal Popular Play amongst Children Irbid Yarmouk University Press 1987 Marcus Clare Cooper and Carolyn Francis eds People Places Design Guidelines for Urban Open Space New York Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990 Morcos R E Design for Children in the Built Environment Ph D diss University of Ain Shams 1991 Motloch John L Introduction to Landscape Design New York Van Nostrand Reinhold 1991 Moughtin Cliff Urban Design Street and Square Oxford Butterworth Architecture 1992 Omet Diana Tasmim bi at lu b al atfal Design of Children s Play Environments Master s thesis University of Jordan 2000 Rapoport Amos Thirty Three Papers in Environmental Behaviour Research New Castle The Urban International Press 1994 Rudolph Nancy Work Yards Playgrounds Planned for Adventure New York Columbia University Teachers College 1974 Sheridan Mary D Spontaneous Play in Early Childhood From Birth to Six Years Berkshire NFER Publishing 1977 Stine Sharon Landscapes for Learning Creating Outdoor Environments for Children and Youth New York John Wiley 1997 UNESCO The Child and Play Theoretical Approaches and Teaching Applications Paris UNESCO 1980 Web Sites http www bsu edu classes harwood Web site of the Child Study Center at Ball State University The site discusses the experience of designing a play environment for the Child Study Center by a group of students at Ball State University s College of Architecture and Planning http www childcare tas gov au regulation homecare 16 outdoor htm Web site of the Child Care Unit of the Department of Education of Tasmania Australia The site discusses various subjects related to childcare http www e bility com articles play shtml This web site features an article by Kate Bishop a designer of play environments entitled Designing Learning

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/articles-and-lectures-on-landscape-design/other-material-on-landscape-design/designing-a-play-environment-with-children-at-sahab/sahab-playground-project-page-8/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sahab Playground Project page 3 » CSBE
    possible to construct the playground Few children said it would not be possible while others assured that it would be possible Each group was asked to explain the reasons that led them to their conclusion The children who believed it would not be possible to construct the playground raised a number of valid concerns These included the fact that olive trees are planted throughout the site that the windows of the center might break as a result of impact with balls and that the dirt ground with its little stones is not suitable for most ball games They also mentioned the lack of shaded areas Some children wrote these obstacles on a sheet of paper for all to see Every obstacle was discussed to see if it could be overcome Consequently the children suggested removing the trees from the plot Some suggested inquiring if the trees could be transplanted to other locations They also suggested surrounding the playground with a high wire mesh to prevent possible damage to nearby windows and to keep the balls inside the playground Some suggested changing the existing ground surface into one that is more suitable for ball games The children discussed different ground covers such as grass sand and asphalt They felt that grass is the best for safety reasons but is a very expensive option which needs considerable maintenance and constant watering They also believed that sand is a cheep and safe surface but not good for all ball games They also were aware that an asphalt cover would be suitable for all ball games and cheaper than grass but that players might sometimes get hurt when falling on it After discussing the positive and negative aspects for each ground cover they decided that asphalt would be the most appropriate choice Some children were concerned that young men in the community might end up dominating the playground and that they would not allow the children to use it Some suggested dividing the playground into two sections and others suggested setting certain days for each group Most of the children favored a time schedule according to which young men would use the playground only at late hours in the day after the children go home The children documented the discussion on a big sheet of paper The discussion about the swimming pool was as interesting as the one that took place regarding the playground In discussing the possibility of building a swimming pool in the site the children showed an awareness of the steps required for constructing one They explained that the first step would be to dig a big hole in the ground This would be followed by building walls that define the borders of the pool and these should be covered with special tiling They also were aware that providing the pool with water would be expensive and problematic because of the scarcity of water in Jordan They added that the pool water would need to be regularly treated through using a

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/articles-and-lectures-on-landscape-design/other-material-on-landscape-design/designing-a-play-environment-with-children-at-sahab/sahab-playground-project-page-3/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sahab Playground Project Page 4 » CSBE
    a small room with a garden and that it could be made to resemble a real house Others suggested that it resemble a castle a tent or a dome They thought of different materials for the playhouse tree branches 19 occurrences textiles 15 occurrences brick 13 occurrences wood 11 occurrences plastic 2 occurrences and cardboard 1 occurrence The children added that the playhouse primarily would be for pretend play and that different age groups could play together in it The children also suggested that blocks of different shapes and colors would be included for constructive play and placed in the free play zone and the play area reserved for smaller children Other suggestions included repainting an old car or a truck for role play and incorporating a large scale chessboard with specially checkered tiling and big stones The last meeting of the first phase of the project started with a summary of the previous meetings to help the children connect together the various steps of the process in which they have been engaged The site analysis that the children carried out and the activities that the children suggested were displayed in addition to a large map scale 1 100 of the site figure 4 The children were encouraged to think critically in dealing with the results of the site analysis and in making decisions about suggested spaces and features and their location This was possible through examining different options for various types of play and raising questions such as why and where for each of them To begin with they defined the expected users of the play environment These primarily consisted of children of different age groups six years of age and below and whom an adult would accompany six to fourteen years of age and those above fourteen years of age youth figure 5 It was expected that other members of the community who use the center such as women and teachers also would benefit from the play environment Since this play environment would be the only one in the Sahab area the children believed it might become an important attraction point for the Sahab community The children reviewed the issue of access to the site They mentioned that people wishing to come to it might use public transportation private cars or bicycles and might also come on foot They felt that the main visitors entrance should be along the low traffic back street in order to maintain a level of privacy for the PBC building They also suggested that some space be reserved for car parking They added that it also would be possible to enter the site through the multipurpose hall or through the entrance located near the side of the PBC building In addition they suggested creating direct access between the site and the adjacent school In fact they explored opportunities for interaction with the school such as using the play environment during the morning school break and carrying out school activities in the site such

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/publications-and-resources/articles-and-lectures-on-landscape-design/other-material-on-landscape-design/designing-a-play-environment-with-children-at-sahab/sahab-playground-project-page-4/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lab Announcement » CSBE
    the studio Architectural Laboratory II Team Members The Architectural Laboratory II team members include a group of highly accomplished architects and academicians from both inside and outside Jordan They consist of the following Bilal Hammad permanent jury member is a Jordanian architect and is the principal of Bilal Hammad Consultants www bilalhammad com He studied architecture at the University of Alexandria in Egypt and has been practicing in Amman since 1977 In addition to architectural design his work has covered the areas of urban design landscape architecture interior design as well as graphic design especially as it is integrated within architecture He has lectured and served on architectural juries at universities in Jordan and Palestine as well as the Southern California Institute of Architecture SCI ARC in Vico Morcote Switzerland He is responsible for a number of important works of architecture in Jordan These include designing the master plan and landscaping for the 14 hectare Greater Amman Municipality complex in the Ras al Ayn area in the core of Amman and the design of three of the complex s major buildings al Hussein Cultural Center Municipality Building and al Nurayn Mosque Sahel al Hiyari instructor is a Jordanian architect and painter and is the principal architect at Sahel al Hiyari Architect He holds bachelor s degrees in Architecture and Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design and a master s of Architecture in Urban Design from Harvard University His professional experience includes design work with Dar El Handasah Shair and Partners in Cairo Machado Silvetti Associates in Boston and Jafar Tukan and Partners in Amman His paintings have been exhibited in Jordan Lebanon and Italy His architectural work has been featured in a number of architectural journals and web sites including Architectural Record Architecture www arcspace com and www archnewsnow com His work was the subject of the first issue of the CSBE web site feature Exploring the Edge In 2002 Hiyari was chosen as the first architect to receive the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative according to which he has been a protégé of the Pritzker Prize winner architect Alvaro Siza of Portugal Ahmad Humeid studio documentary filmmaker is a Jordanian architect designer and filmmaker and is the co founder Chief Executive Officer and Design Director of SYNTAX He studied architecture at the University of Jordan Before starting Syntax he was the Creative Director of BYTE Middle East and Popular Science Middle East He also is a founding member of Arabia On Line a pioneering internet online service in the region At Syntax he has been advising companies governmental non governmental and international organizations on branding communication and technology He is a regular contributing writer in the regional press on issues of design and technology and his writings can be found at www 360east com where he maintains a blog and has recently started a podcast on media technology and culture in the Arab world He also is a digital video and audio enthusiast and has

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/activities/courses-workshops/architectural-laboratory-ii-2005/lab-announcement/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Architectural Lab II - 2006 » CSBE
    Arabic Favorite Book Lists on Architecture and the Built Environment Graywater Reuse Project Public Lectures The Omrania l CSBE Student Award Water Conserving Landscapes Remembering Ali Maher Other Projects Figure 1 1 Figure 1 2 Figure 1 3 Activities Courses Workshops Architectural Laboratory II 2005 Architectural Lab II Description and Assessment Architectural Laboratory II Description and Assessment Written by Mohammad al Asad and Basma Abdallah 2006 Table of contents Introduction The Intersection The Exploration Tools of Presentation The Teaching Process Students Results 1 Introduction It is difficult to draw a mental map of Amman without incorporating the overpasses and underpasses or tunnels that go through a significant number of its intersections These overpass underpass intersections which have proliferated in the city since the early 1990s have been redefining the manner in which the city functions and the manner in which it is conceived As an exploration of this issue CSBE organized in August 2005 its second Architectural Laboratory entitled Amman Collisions in the Urban Fabric The studio was led by three architects involved in both the practice and teaching of architecture Two of them are from Jordan Sahel Al Hiyari and Yasir Sakr The third Kristopher Musumano is an American

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/activities/courses-workshops/architectural-laboratory-ii-2005/architectural-lab-ii-description-and-assessment/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Images of workshop » CSBE
    2005 Architectural Detailing Course Three Architects Three Modules 2011 Introduction to Landscape Architecture Concepts and Applications Course Flyer 2012 Proposal Writing Course for Architects Engineers 2012 THINK CREATE MAKE 2012 Intuitive Visualization in Architecture 2014 Contemporary Arab City open online course 2014 CSBE photography competitions Diwan al Mimar E Publishing Program Exploring Public Space through Users Behavior also available in Arabic Favorite Book Lists on Architecture and the Built Environment

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/activities/courses-workshops/intuitive-visualization-in-architecture-2014/images-of-workshop/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sketches by workshop participants » CSBE
    Three Modules 2011 Introduction to Landscape Architecture Concepts and Applications Course Flyer 2012 Proposal Writing Course for Architects Engineers 2012 THINK CREATE MAKE 2012 Intuitive Visualization in Architecture 2014 Contemporary Arab City open online course 2014 CSBE photography competitions Diwan al Mimar E Publishing Program Exploring Public Space through Users Behavior also available in Arabic Favorite Book Lists on Architecture and the Built Environment Graywater Reuse Project Public Lectures The

    Original URL path: http://www.csbe.org/activities/courses-workshops/intuitive-visualization-in-architecture-2014/sketches-by-workshop-participants/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •