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  • at the Kazakh Institute of Archaeology suggested that the skeleton was that of a male after examining only the cranium and a few long bones Subsequently Ismagulov has said concerning the skeleton that it had been badly fragmented and was in very poor condition at the time of excavation He also indicated that the skeleton was that of a very small person and could well have been that of a female personal communication to Dr Davis Kimball The body had been attired in boots trousers and a leather tunic caftan decorated with some 2 400 arrow shaped gold plaques Plaques of horses with twisted torsos decorated scabbards that held an iron dagger and a sword Ceramic silver and bronze vessels a bronze mirror and flat wooden dishes and beaters for koumiss fermented mare s milk were also found in the tomb There are many similarities between the Issyk Gold Man s tomb and other warrior priestess burials For instance a conical headress was found in the Gold Man s tomb It was decorated in gold and was 25 inches tall Gold foil depictions of animals were attached to the sides of the headdress Though believed to be a man s tomb this headdress reminded the Kazhak excavators of bridal hats passed down through generations to be worn by brides in traditional weddings The Gold Man s tomb contained three earrings with turquoise carnelian and white beads which suggests jewelry not associated with Saka men The tomb also contained a silver spoon with a slender handle Carved bone spoons were found in the warrior and priestess burials at Pokrovka and other Sarmatian sites Similar to the Gold Man burial the Pokrovka burials also contained bronze mirrors which are associated with priestesses In 1993 the frozen body of a fifth century B

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Articles_Reivews/GoldMan_review.html (2016-02-09)
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  • over the Qipchaq steppe between 1223 1227 At this time the steppe was divided it into three large political dominions Although the Qipchaq steppe was occasionally united by various nomadic confederations prior to the Mongols arrival it was the Mongols who welded the vast steppe into an unprecedented degree of unity This was accomplished through a rigid military political system and the absolute personal power of a supreme ruler Following a steppe tradition of land allotment the Qipchaq steppe was reorganized by Batu Khan d 1255 Juchi s second son into three territorially and economically independent entities called ulus es each with a demarcated territory These three uluses each led by a Juchid sometimes bowed in obedience to the stronger central authority and at other times fought amongst themselves As a unit they brought profound changes into the steppe society Nothing was more consequential than their direct contribution to the formation of various modern Turkic speaking nationalities including the Tatars Nogais Qazaqs and Uzbeks At the end of the l4th century the formerly centralized Golden Horde gradually slipped into a dissolution process Simultaneously several subordinate uluses merged as distinct political unions functioning in the capacity of economic guarantors for their

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Articles_Reivews/janabel.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Sponsorship Opportunities
    SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES The Center for the Study of Eurasian Nomads is actively seeking major corporate foundation and private sponsorship for scientific research projects and publications particularly translations from Russian to English Sponsorship offers a wide range of publicity through multimedia and public education as well as product placement opportunities for sponsors All donations are tax deductible Please contact Dr Jeannine Davis Kimball jkimball csen org Donations and contributions may be

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/csen.tofc/sponsorship_opp.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Download-Nomad188579-00-2
    Home Download Nomads of the Eurasian Steppes in the Early Iron Age Jeannine Davis Kimball Vladimir A Bashilov Leonid T Yablonsky Eds Berkeley CA Zinat Press 1995 Adobe Acrobat Required

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Pubs_Sales_Reviews/Nomads/DownloadNomad188579-00-2.html (2016-02-09)
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  • The Herdsmen: A Review
    small subplots meant to introduce tension are only rarely successful Latay and 13 year old son Nuney look for a camel that has been lost for two months The camel is never found as the plot shifts to two young Kazaks whom Latay and Nuney help them pull a wagon loaded with wood from the River Ertis The resilience of these Kazak youngsters is established as we see them wade thigh deep in icy water snow banks still lie along the river s edge Soon Latay is seen with a group of unidentified men who find a downed pregnant horse that they pull to standing position thus saving her life The scenes meant to be the most dramatic are the most staged The family moves out to spring pasture with a herd of cows and a nice bunch of Bactrian two humped camels They must cross a raging river Cows are seen fighting rapids as they are swept away downstream Some are pulled and pushed up a steep bank on the opposite side In the next scene we see cows milling along the sandy river s edge It then becomes apparent as we also see truck tracks emerging from the riverbed that these animals have crossed where the river is wide and shallow Here the subtitle announces that after 48 hours they have safely crossed the river although they lost five cows Later the sheep never seen in the river crossing are trailed up a rocky canyon pass arriving at Keylewtan A baby is nursed in her cradle before the families set up their yurts During spring pasture sheep are shorn and the wool is sold to itinerate merchants The most dramatic and true to life moments are the long and arduous trek to summer pasture As camels laden with disassembled yurts the elongated herd of sheep and the family on horseback the baby in a blanket covered cradle straddling the pommel of the saddle cross a narrow bridge in great disrepair Our breath is held as we see the raging white water of the mountain river swollen with spring melt in the chasm below The caravan winds through groves of Tien Shan pine and traverses narrow rocky ledges to reach the summit before dropping to Eday the summer pasture that lies adjacent to glistening glaciers This same route must be repeated in reverse when the cold rain and winds of September drive this small aul from its idyllic setting Arriving again at Keylewtan the most heated exchange of the entire year takes place as Latay sells sheep to Han Chinese merchants He thinks the sheep are not weighed correctly and want to see the scales The Chinese refuse The arguments get hotter and louder although the sub titles proclaim Let s not argue Finally there is an agreement money is exchanged and locked up by Latay s wife after they have weighed their purchase of either rice or flour The scales are correct they agree At Aktobek winter has

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Articles_Reivews/Herdsmen%20Review/Herdsmen_Review.html (2016-02-09)
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  • the Study of the Eurasian Nomads CSEN Street Scenes in Urumchi China Urumchi Bazaar Scenes A Uigher Boy Two Young Women All photographs were taken with a Hitachi MPEG digital

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/china_1998/China1.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Nomads CSEN Scenes from the Bogda Shan Xinjiang Autonomous Region Western China 1997 Glacier Lake and Glaciers Kazakh Woman and Child Yurts in Turfan Making Cheese All photographs were taken

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/china_1998/China2.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Nomads CSEN Along the Northern Rim of the Taklimakan Desert Xinjiang Autonomous Region Western China Archaeological City Kizil Caves Oasis Town Taklimakan Desert Repairing the Road All photographs were taken

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/china_1998/China3.html (2016-02-09)
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