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  • 2004 Fieldwork Report
    be a Kipchak Polovtsian era sanctuary dating to the11 13th centuries AD The sanctuary had been placed on a Sauromation kurgan dating to the 4th century BC The kurgan contained two burials supposedly a male and a female The male burial had been robbed in ancient times Human bones were mixed with animal bones The animal bones were mostly covered with green bronze oxide It is assumed that they had been deposited in a bronze cauldron which was later taken by the robbers The female burial was partially robbed in ancient times The robbers took the garments embroidered with bone and gold beads and destroyed the upper torso of the skeleton The rest of the skeleton was well preserved Artifacts found in this burial were a bronze mirror bronze bracelet and few bone and golden beads Kurgan 20 This kurgan was excavated by a group of students from the Rostov State University This mound dated to the Early Bronze Age with the primary burial belonging to the second half of the third millennium BC Several secondary burials dating to the Catacomb Culture of the Middle Bronze Age middle of the second millennium BC and the Srubnaya Culture of the Late

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Archives/Chastiye_Kurgany_Reports/Chastiye_2004_Report/2004_Chastiye_Report.html (2016-02-09)
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  • 2004 Fieldwork Report
    sector of the settlement stone foundations reinforced with clay revealed the existence of a group of buildings In the northwest sector several rectangular buildings were fenced with a thick stone wall The most interesting artifacts in this sector of the settlement were a bronze element from a harness and a hand molded black ceramic pot both dating 8th century AD In the northwestern part of the settlement remains of stone houses were excavated The small area fenced with a wall and paved with the flat stones defined where the houses had once stood Pits were also excavated in the pavement These might have been the foundation for wooden logs that had supported a shed A small oven for making flat cakes was also excavated Several kitchen pits possibly used for storing food were found in this part of a fortress One had been used by the local people as a grave as they were abandoning the settlement A male burial with parts of a harness and pieces of iron was found in the pit Four additional burials were also excavated It is assumed they date to the era of the Golden Horde as they predated the settlement When the archaeologists reached the bottom of the burial in a kitchen pit they discovered an entrance to a shaft a dromos leading to a catacomb burial beneath the burial Due to the lateness of the season it was impossible to excavate the second burial so the shaft was conserved so that it can be excavated next season This shaft may lead to a burial dating to the second millennium BC a Middle Bronze Age Catacomb Culture If not this then it may be a Sarmatian catacomb burial or a Khazar era Alanic catacomb burial Most likely it is the remains of a

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Golden_Hills-All_Files/Golden_Hills_2004_Report/2004_Golden_Hills_Report.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Beiram Kurgan April 1999
    that serves as a cultic locale to offer ritual items background right Increased vehicle traffic through the region resulting of Òmarket economyÓ has encouraged the further development of the oovo According to a local Mongol herder who was an official at the time before the Russian revolution Beiram was a meeting point each autumn for Russians and Mongols to exchange sheep horses camels and yak that might have strayed across

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Beiram%20Excavation%20Report/kurgan_2.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Astragal
    the excavation was the astragal a bone from the back ankle of sheep and other animals The astragal is traditionally used for divinations This pile of astragal which included cow astragal top right and mountain goat top left right were

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Beiram%20Excavation%20Report/astragal.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Feature 1 Pot 2
    Detail of the wheelthrown glazed pot belonging to the Ching Dynasty period Grains of wheat placed in the pot are visible as yellow flecks in the dark soil

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Beiram%20Excavation%20Report/feature1_pot2.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Beiram Excavation Report 2
    region I first surveyed the excavation in July 1996 no 2 The mound of stones measuring approximately 60 x 72 feet was encircled by a ring of stones more t han 35 feet beyond the mound paths of stones placed at the cardinal points connected the mound and the ring The kurgan was chosen for excavation because of its large size its construction which was similar to Saka kurgans noted

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Beiram%20Excavation%20Report/beiram_exc_rpt2.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Carved Deer
    relates the construction of the mound to the Saka period 500 300 B C The carving has strong analogies with artifacts from the Sailygeme Kurgans located to the northwest in the Russian Siberian Altai Mountains Several similar wood carved animals

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/Beiram%20Excavation%20Report/wood.animal.html (2016-02-09)
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  • 2005 Baga Gazaryn Chuluu Index
    Tech Western world participants will be under the auspices of CSEN and the organization will facilitate obtaining any invitations or permits needed by participants Because of the time needed to process documents in Ulaanbaatar and to obtain visas from the Mongolian Embassy in Washington DC deadline for applications must be strictly adhered to Please refer to Application and Contribution Deadlines Center for the Study of Eurasian Nomads CSEN 2158 Palomar Ave Ventura CA 93001 For additional information contact the CSEN Project Director at Email jkimball csen org Tele FAX 805 653 2607 LOCATION Mongolia South central Mongolia Middle Gobi province approximately 50 km north of the city of Mandalgov N 46 01 E 106 12 See map PROJECT Pedestrian survey and small scale excavation at the site of Baga Gazaryn Chuluu CHRONOLOGICAL RANGE OF SITES Upper Paleolithic to the 19th and 20th century AD with emphasis on the Bronze Age and the Bronze and Early Iron Age mid 2nd to mid 1st millennium BC PROJECT DATES Two Sessions June 7 to June 26 2005 July 6 to July 27 2005 These sessions are recommended as we expect the full research staff to be in the field during these dates Session schedules and duration may be negotiable in order to accommodate the needs of volunteers There is a limited number of participant positions open for the 2004 field season APPLICATION DEADLINES First Session May 1 2005 Second Session June 1 2005 REQUIREMENTS Minimum age 20 No experience required Training will be provided by both American and Mongolian archaeologists It is important that Participants are able to withstand challenging field conditions a moderate workload especially hiking living in tents under semi desert conditions and a meat oriented diet They should also have a good sense of humor and be able to cope

    Original URL path: http://www.csen.org/BGC_All_Files/BGC-Survey_2005/2005_BGC_Index.html (2016-02-09)
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