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  • Columbus Water Works
    potentially contaminate your drinking water Because of this CWW requires that all meters come equipped with a backflow prevention device to protect all customers from contaminants being introduced either intentionally or accidentally into the water system A backflow prevention device prevents the flowing back of water into the water main It is usually installed at the water meter Back To Top Q Is there a law requiring that I have a backflow prevention device A Yes Federal law requires CWW as the provider of the municipal water system to protect the system from being compromised by backflow once the water has passed through a customer s meter Therefore CWW requires a backflow prevention device be in place for its customers before we will provide service Back To Top Q Does everyone have to comply with these regulations A Yes because of the federal mandate CWW is under regarding backflow prevention and because it serves as a way of protecting the water supply it is imperative that all customers have backflow prevention devices Back To Top Q Why do backflow devices need to be tested and by whom A Backflow devices need to be tested to ensure no contamination has entered CWW s distribution system or residents homes or businesses A certified backflow tester typically performs these tests Back To Top Q What is thermal expansion A Whenever water is heated it expands and this is called thermal expansion Thermal expansion can cause the pressure to increase in a plumbing system where a backflow device has been installed To prevent this problem a thermal expansion device is installed on the cold water side of interior plumbing to allow for this pressure relief The fix can be an inexpensive one CWW offers a thermal expansion device at our cost of 25 that

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/faq/customerservice/faqsbackflow.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    withdrawn from the Chattahoochee River and Lake Oliver Known as raw water because it has not yet been treated or cleaned this water undergoes extensive processes and testing at the North Columbus Water Resource Facility to achieve water quality standards CWW uses conventional industry methods to treat the raw water and there are a number of steps 1 Specially designed screens capture any large pieces of material such as sticks and debris and keeps them out of the treatment system 2 The next step is called flocculation and sedimentation During flocculation approved chemicals are added to the raw water to combine or coagulate small particles mud silt ect that may be suspended in the water essentially the additives cause the particles to clump together The water then goes through mechanical mixers which stir the chemicals and raw water together to form clumped particles known as floc The floc becomes heavy and through gravity settles to the bottom of the tanks This is also known as sedimentation The water flows out and into another holding basin leaving the floc in the bottom of the tank 3 Chlorine is then added to the water to disinfect it and ensure that potentially dangerous microbes are killed 4 After disinfection the water passes through filters which remove particles from the water such as clays silts natural organic matter and microorganisms 5 Once the water passes through the filters chlorine lime and fluoride are added and the water now called finished water is stored in large holding tanks called clearwells 6 From there it will eventually be sent to home and businesses through a series of pipelines known as the distribution system To ensure that the finished water from the treatment facilities remains safe for you and your family the quality is regularly monitored by

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/facility.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    the quality of treated drinking water All drinking water deemed safe is allowed to contain materials or particulates that have not been shown to pose a health concern when kept within allowable limits Federal and state regulations set the allowable limits for these materials To help you better understand your drinking water CWW has compiled a Drinking Water Fact Sheet Water Treatment NCWRF Water Quality Report Drinking Water Fact Sheet

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/drinkingwaterfactsheet.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    1974 During wet weather events when stormwater may enter the system it can treat up to 70 mgd and if necessary can handle up to 84 mgd In keeping with our commitment to be a good neighbor many of the tanks processing the wastewater are enclosed to reduce odors CWW has 35 pumping stations also called lift stations that help move the wastewater flow from low lying areas into the collection system that carries flows to the facility for treatment Acquired by contract in 2004 CWW now collects and treats all wastewater from Fort Benning at the South Columbus Water Resource Facility CWW laboratory staff carefully monitors the wastewater process providing daily analysis of the influent that comes into the plant and the effluent that leaves it Lab staff also takes samples at the Combined Sewer Overflow sites and at industries connected to the sewer system While these activities are mandated by State and Federal regulations CWW takes its role as a steward of the environment very seriously In fact the utility has a contract with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division EPD to monitor water quality in the stretch of the Chattahoochee River in and around Columbus South Columbus Water Resources Facility Recognition 2002 AMSA Platinum 5 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2002 GW PCA Platinum 5 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2003 AMSA Gold 100 NPDES compliance 2003 GW PCA Platinum 6 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2004 NACWA Gold 100 compliance NPDES 2004 GAWP Platinum 7 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2005 NACWA Gold 100 compliance NPDES 2005 GAWP Platinum 8 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2006 NACWA Gold 100 compliance NPDES 2006 GAWP Platinum 9 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2007 NACWA Gold 100 compliance NPDES 2007 GAWP Platinum 10 years consecutive NPDES 100 compliance 2008 NACWA

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/southcolumbuswastewatertreatmentfacility.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    per year of biosolids The solids are anaerobically digested primary and waste activated sludge The Biosolids program must maintain compliance with the Georgia Environmental Protection Department EPD and the US EPA Part 503 Biosolids Regulations New Class A Technology A new innovative Process to Further Reduce Pathogens PFRP is being developed which will cost effectively produce a Class A biosolids product The process was originally suggested during sludge studies consisting of sequenced thermophilic reactors The process has been confirmed in bench scale studies at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and a prototype unit at the Columbus wastewater plant The new patent for this project has been donated to the Water Environment Research Foundation so as to be available to other public systems This project will further enhance CWW s options for biosolids disposal Organization The Columbus Water Works is a municipal enterprise operation under the direction of a five member board The day to day operations are directed by the President Steve Davis All treatment operations are managed by the Division of Water Resources Managed Maintenance and Security which is led by Senior V P Cliff Arnett and Vice President Lynn Campbell The Superintendent of the South Columbus

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/biosolids.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    Biosolids Flow Through Thermophilic Treatment CBFT3 Process click here To read about the Evaluation of Combined Heat and Power Technologies for Wastewater Facilities as described in document EPA 832 R 10 006 Sept 2012 Click Here Water Environment Research Foundation WERF article Class A Cake and Energy Too To read article click here Wastewater Treatment South Columbus Facility Biosolids CBFT3 Combined Sewer Overflow CALL BEFORE YOU DIG Whether you are

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/cbft3.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    system stormwater is the runoff from parking lots rooftops and driveways When the system can no longer manage the amount of flow coming in a mix of untreated wastewater and stormwater are discharged typically into the nearest body of water When 1990 studies showed that Columbus had one or more CSOs discharging into the Chattahoochee River CWW took the lead in resolving the issue in order to comply with a directive from the State of Georgia Environmental Protection Division EPD and meet the strict standards of the federal Clean Water Act Within one year CWW had launched a CSO master plan part of which called for consolidation of 16 CSOs into two direct treatment facilities Going one step further CWW saw an opportunity to not only solve a water quality issue but bring a recreational and aesthetic landmark to Columbus by rolling the consolidation into other community improvements Development of the City s Riverwalk along the Chattahoochee River became a reality under the leadership of CWW When the CSO program was completed in 1995 CWW was the only utility in the state to avoid fines by meeting the mandated deadline CWW s CSO program was also one of the first

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/combinedseweroverflowfacilities.aspx (2016-05-01)
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  • Columbus Water Works
    every month which includes Ft Benning Site locations are residential homes and business Sampling is performed by certified drinking water technicians one for Columbus and one for Ft Benning The Lab performs around 14 test methods on samples collected Examples include pH chlorine and fluoride The Lab also collects samples for the state of Georgia that are sent to other labs To view the Water Quality Monitoring Laboratory Brochure click here Wastewater Samples are collected at the South Columbus Water Resource Facility SCWRF and from local industries Samples are collected by employees at the SCWRF and laboratory employees The Lab performs around 30 test methods on samples collected Examples include pH total solids and total suspended solids The lab also performs tests on Combined Sewer Overflow CSO and collects samples from the Chattahoochee River River Run that are sent to state labs Awards Received by the Laboratory Laboratory Quality Assurance Awards 1998 1999 2002 2004 Drinking Water Laboratory serving greater than 100 000 population 1998 2002 Wastewater Laboratory serving greater than 10 MGD million gallons day 2009 Drinking Water Laboratory serving greater than 100 000 population 2009 Wastewater Laboratory serving greater than 20 MGD From January 2010 thru December 2009

    Original URL path: http://www.cwwga.org/plaintext/departments/generalserviceslab.aspx (2016-05-01)
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