archive-org.com » ORG » D » DEVELOPMENTGATEWAY.ORG

Total: 350

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Privacy & Terms | Development Gateway
    However we do our best to ensure the highest level of security on our systems Notice We may amend this privacy policy at any time by posting the amended terms on the website Your continued use of this website following the posting of changes to Privacy Policy will mean that you accept these changes Questions inquiries or concerns For any further questions inquiries or concerns regarding our privacy practices please contact info developmentgateway org Terms and Conditions Access to these sites is provided to you the User subject to the following terms and conditions which may be updated by us from time to time Also use of certain areas of the sites is subject to additional posted guidelines or rules applicable to such areas and those guidelines or rules are hereby incorporated by reference into these terms and conditions Development Gateway maintains the Development Gateway website at http www developmentgateway org the Development Gateway International website at http www dginternational org and various information services portals including AidData dgMarket and Zunia as a courtesy to those who may choose to access these sites Users The Development Gateway web site features information about Development Gateway and Development Gateway International Development Gateway provides information and services for the development community USE OF SITE CONTENT The Development Gateway web site contains information text graphics software and other content the Site Content The Site Content is protected under the copyright laws of the United States and of other countries Unless indicated otherwise on the Site Content we ask that you contact us at info developmentgateway org for permission for any reproduction modification or distribution of such Site Content Some Site Content has been submitted by the Development Gateway s partners Users and by third parties and may be subject to more specific restrictions as indicated on such Site Content CONTRIBUTED CONTENT We do not claim ownership of content you submit or make available Contributed Content for inclusion on Zunia However with respect to original Contributed Content for inclusion on Zunia you grant Development Gateway a perpetual royalty free license to use distribute reproduce make derivative works edit publish translate publicly perform and publicly display such Contributed Content in whole or in part and to incorporate such Contributed Content into other works in any format or medium now known or later developed If you contribute content that does not constitute your original work of authorship as defined under US Copyright Law but a third party holds the copyright and other proprietary rights to such content you represent and warrant to Development Gateway that you do not infringe on any third party s copyright or other proprietary rights and that you have secured all necessary permissions and licenses prior to contributing such content to Zunia Development Gateway reserves the right for any reason to remove without notice any Contributed Content from the Forums COPYRIGHT NOTICE If you believe in good faith that your copyrighted work has been reproduced on the Development Gateway web site including the

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/privacy-and-terms/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Category: results data | Development Gateway
    First Ghana Country Visit January 20 2016 Susan Stout results data Every day governments development partners and civil society leaders make a multitude of decisions about how to allocate monitor and evaluate development assistance Continue reading Are Government M E Systems Effectively Institutionalized and Coordinated January 05 2016 EPAR results data The development community is increasingly interested in institutionalizing monitoring and evaluation M E in Continue reading Evaluating Government Monitoring Evaluation Systems of Aid Recipient Countries December 15 2015 EPAR results data Since 2005 when major donors endorsed the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness Continue reading Crosswalking data relationships for analysis December 02 2015 Danny Walker results data In our last post we discussed the crosswalk portion of the Results Data Initiative a project with the goal to make results data more useful and relatable across Continue reading Steps towards crosswalking development data October 20 2015 Danny Walker results data In today s development sphere donors and local governments gather increasingly large amounts of data Open data initiatives Continue reading RDI Consultation Readout October 15 2015 Vinisha Bhatia results data On September 23 Development Gateway hosted a consultation meeting for the Results Data Initiative RDI Continue reading The Indicators Behind

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/categories/results-data/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog | Development Gateway
    a lot of misconceptions about using geographical information systems GIS in development that it s a niche tool or one that requires a large budget Continue reading Open Contracting in Vietnam November 12 2015 Josh Powell Paige Kirby open data Development Gateway is proud to announce a new program with the Government of Vietnam supported by the World Bank Open Contracting team to help increase the transparency Continue reading What is the Aid Management Program November 09 2015 Paige Kirby aid management In many countries around the world overseas development assistance foreign aid serves as a significant funding source for public programs However governments Continue reading How to Find Analyze and Apply Aid Data November 04 2015 Dustin Homer Paige Kirby Josh Powell aid management open data The global community as represented at the Open Government Partnership OGP Summit and beyond has made strides in producing a variety of open data including open aid data Continue reading Meet you at OGP15 October 27 2015 Paige Kirby This week DG is participating in the Open Government Partnership s 2015 Global Summit in Mexico City Continue reading Steps towards crosswalking development data October 20 2015 Danny Walker results data In today s

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/blog/page2/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Aid Management Program | Development Gateway
    interactive dashboards and maps decision makers can allocate resources where most needed Features include GIS mapping South South Cooperation tracking IATI import tool open API Financial Management System integration Component II Training To ensure lasting impact technology should be adopted as part of a larger effort to bring partners together and put sustainable management processes in place For this reason the program s implementation includes hands on training for government and development partners data management plans ongoing technical support and an annual Good Practices Workshop Component III Policy Support We encourage government partners to open up aid information to the public through accessible AMP public portals By making this information more transparent governments increase credibility can leverage public scrutiny to hold development partners accountable and come closer to closing the feedback loop by facilitating public debate and discourse we are now more effective and more efficient because the information necessary is just one click away Government of Kosovo Representative Development Gateway created the Aid Management Program in collaboration with the OECD World Bank UNDP and Governments of Ethiopia and India Anchored in the principles of the global aid effectiveness agenda the program contributes to aid coordination and harmonization helping governments

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/expertise/amp/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Results Data Initiative | Development Gateway
    in three countries identifying ways to improve data quality sharing and use in the health and agriculture sectors Some of our important questions include Quality Who collects data and how Is data quality adequate Does the data meet actual needs How much time does data collection demand How can data collection quality and reporting be improved Sharing How can we compare results data from different donors governments and implementers Is there demand for comparability Should data be shared more freely If so how Use How is results data analyzed and used to inform actual policies and plans Does or can access to results data improve decision making Do the right people have the right data How else can or should we promote data use Vision Our goal is to influence the ways that development actors both internationally and locally approach the results data that they collect share and use We hope that our findings will prompt agencies and organizations to rethink the data they gather and make sure that the right people can use this data for the right decisions The Approach We aim to illustrate the situation on the ground for results data users and producers and to outline what the development community can do to improve quality ensure comparability and promote effective data use The initiative has two elements Component I Survey hundreds of results data producers and users in three countries Ghana Tanzania and Sri Lanka How are results data collected managed shared and used at the local and national level Working with local research partners we are interviewing up to 200 government officials donor staff NGO operators and others in each country with special focus given to local level governments and implementers Our interviews seek to uncover obstacles to data quality sharing and use highlight success

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/expertise/results/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Evaluating Government Monitoring & Evaluation Systems of Aid-Recipient Countries | Development Gateway
    M E Systems for Aid in 23 Developing Countries EPAR rated each M E system for its effectiveness and quality using a set of 93 questions covering institutionalization coordination and harmonization of the system as well as processes for collecting analyzing and using the results data Figure 2 Figure 2 Flow of Information and Resources in National M E Systems Perspectives on National Government M E Systems From the donor perspective the cost of implementing their own systems for monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of aid programs may exceed the benefits aid could be more efficiently monitored and evaluated if these capacities were shared across donors via a national M E system From the recipient government perspective multiple uncoordinated donor M E systems increase reporting burdens and make it difficult to allocate scarce monitoring resources to building and maintaining national capacity for M E Developing national M E systems paired with harmonization of M E protocols across donors and recipient governments has been proposed as a possible pathway for alleviating these concerns International agreements such as the Paris Declaration and subsequent Accra Agenda commit aid recipients and donors to better align their M E systems A 2011 OECD study however highlighted that only one of 13 Paris Declaration donor aid effectiveness targets for 2010 had been met Donors failure to meet commitments to enhance harmonization with recipient country M E systems makes it less likely that national M E systems will improve and more likely that donors continue to implement their own separate M E systems Research Findings EPAR finds that national M E systems of aid recipient countries vary widely in their levels of development Most governments are increasingly emphasizing the importance of M E and have plans in place for developing their national systems Many countries however continue

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/12/15/evaluating-government-monitoring-evaluation/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Are Government M&E Systems Effectively Institutionalized and Coordinated? | Development Gateway
    M E information as noted in 15 of 42 systems Half of the systems reviewed 21 of 42 describe challenges for increasing internal demand for M E These challenges include limited internal capacity and dedicated resources for responding to increased demand for M E activities as well as difficulty managing the pace and sequencing of M E reforms to overcome internal resistance Three systems also report difficulties in incentivizing M E use due to separate systems for monitoring budgets and outcomes or fears that M E information will jeopardize funding Clarity of Institutional M E Roles As observed by Kusek Rist clear institutional roles and responsibilities not only contribute to a systematic and accountability driven M E system but are necessary for M E activities to be fully implemented EPAR finds that defining and clarifying roles and leadership is a key challenge in many M E systems A review of health sector M E systems in Rwanda and Uganda concludes that this challenge may emerge from overlapping mandates loose coordination of M E activities and unclear boundaries for M E functions In spite of these challenges nearly half of systems reviewed 19 of 42 rate high on the clarity of institutional roles with government plans assigning responsibility for different M E roles to specific offices and evidence to suggest that these responsibilities are being fulfilled On the other hand nine systems have a low rating indicating limited evidence of how M E activities are assigned and implemented Many systems have one ministry or office responsible for M E activities but in some cases the responsibilities are spread across a variety of different offices Several systems including the majority of HIV AIDS M E systems 8 of 14 confer responsibility to a single multi sectoral agency drawing representatives from different offices Of the nine systems with a single multi sectoral agency responsible for M E seven rate high for institutional clarity and two rate medium indicating that this approach may help make M E implementation more effective For the remaining M E systems however there is no clear association between the types of government offices involved and the clarity of institutional roles Harmonization of M E Activities Porter and Goldman 2013 write that aid recipient countries generally have several separate M E systems usually including a general national system as well as specific M E systems for different sectors This setup can create challenges for efficiency and for coordinating and harmonizing M E activities In their 2007 review of results based national development strategies the World Bank suggests many systems are challenged by a lack of clarity or mandate for the office in charge of M E coordination and others face difficulties in coordinating M E activities across multiple sectors and levels of government Some studies also find systems have insufficient capacity for coordinating activities often due to limited funding for staff and relevant skills training EPAR finds that just six M E systems have clearly coordinated and aligned M E

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2016/01/05/government-mande-institutionalized/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Are Results Data from Government M&E Systems Effectively Collected, Analyzed, and Used? | Development Gateway
    systems include clear rules for verifying data Although often constrained by staff technical capacity and availability of electronic infrastructure IT based M E systems can greatly increase efficiency relative to paper based systems that are still commonly used by many aid recipient governments at different levels of collecting and aggregating data Twelve of 42 systems have established IT based M E systems that integrate collecting aggregating and verifying data and 12 others describe plans to develop such systems The remaining 18 systems may also use IT tools for M E activities but these tools do not form the basis of their M E systems IT based systems vary in complexity from standardized Excel based forms to proprietary data management software tools The Nigeria HIV AIDS system for example uses a tool developed by the Global Fund to review the quality of data submitted from local agencies on a monthly and quarterly basis Data Analysis and Evaluation Many M E systems are criticized for concentrating on monitoring and ignoring evaluation and for collecting and reporting information on various indicators without analyzing what the results mean for the effectiveness of government activities and applying that analysis to budgeting and planning Most M E systems we review have well developed output indicators which allow governments to assess their performance in implementing their strategy Further 14 systems conduct or plan to conduct audits of expenditures against budgets to assess implementation performance A frequent challenge among the M E systems we reviewed however is an overemphasis on outputs as opposed to outcomes This focus appears to be especially pronounced in health M E systems which regularly track a wide variety of output indicators describing quantities of services provided but do not track as many outcome indicators measuring effects of those services While 34 of 42 systems show evidence of tracking changes in outcome indicators over time as a form of basic analysis just 13 of these explicitly describe how they use before and after data from time series to evaluate the effectiveness of their programs Only six systems go beyond measuring changes in outcome indicators and also evaluate the cost effectiveness of their activities Twenty two M E systems describe specific challenges with their capacity for evaluation Challenges include insufficient funding and staffing low levels of training and experience and weak institutional support for results analysis Some systems address capacity challenges by supporting internal capacity building as Chile for example started with simple desk evaluations to build capacity for more complex evaluation Some systems note however that the presence of separate donor M E systems limits the availability of trained and experienced evaluators to support government M E systems Use of Results Information in Policy Strategy Planning and Budget Allocations The end goal of an M E system is not simply to generate continuous results data but to provide decision makers with information to improve performance and achieve intended outcomes M E information can be used in a variety of ways but two important uses

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2016/01/26/government-mande-used/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive



  •