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  • Open Data in Senegal | Development Gateway
    reserve a line in the national budget for the opening and distribution of data already available This will promote the institutionalization of the practice of free open data aimed at serving Senegalese citizens Despite a decline of six places in the world rankings according to the Global Open Data Index an index that classifies sixty countries according to the level and quality of open data published by governments and their accessibility to civil society the media and citizens Senegal is currently third in Africa after South Africa and Burkina Faso We look forward to continue working with our government colleagues in continuing to prioritize open data in Senegal Open Data au Sénégal Le Gouvernement Sénégalais a démontré son engagement à mettre en place une politique Open Data lors d un atelier sur le thème accès aux données géospatiales sur les services sociaux de base qui a eu lieu le 17 septembre 2015 à Dakar Le potentiel de la géomatique soit le traitement des données géospatiales comme un outil de soutien dans le processus de prise de décision était l un des messages clés de la conférence Le but ultime de celle ci étant de souligner le rôle central que pourrait jouer l Open Data dans l émergence du pays en incitant à la mise en place d une convention interministérielle pour améliorer la qualité de l information avec les services sectoriels notamment la santé et l éducation En l occurrence le gouvernement à travers l Agence Nationale de la Statistique et de la Démographie a mis en place un nouveau portail web cartographique accessible à tous pour faciliter la consultation des indicateurs socio économiques et géographiques L importance des données ouvertes dans la réalisation des services à fort impact économique a été surtout soulignée Par exemple le Gouvernement Canadien le

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/10/01/open-data-senegal/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Arrays, Objects, and Trees: A Look at JSON-formatted Contracting Data | Development Gateway
    techies and is becoming the most frequent formatting of Application Program Interfaces APIs many open data users may find JSON formatted data harder to use for data analysis In order to show how JSON formatted data can still be analyzed I examined our very own EU Public Contract Database published last year This database contains over 2 000 000 contracts from 2006 to 2014 in over 28 European countries To extract the data I used R the free and open source statistical analysis software and RJSONIO an extension package that allows users to convert JSON content to R objects The process enabled me to take a massive database and split it up into readable chunks Using ggplot2 a data visualization package for R I was able to graph certain interesting trends hidden in the database For all of the following graphs I decided to focus on contracts in the United Kingdom in 2013 since this part of the database offered a diverse variety of contracts to easily analyze Below is a graph showing the average number of suppliers awarded for each contract in five different sectors The fact that a wide variety of pharmaceutical companies specialize in different drug types could explain the high amount of suppliers in the Medical Equipment and Pharmaceuticals sector relative to the other sectors Below is a graph showing the average number of bids per contract in the same five sectors Notice that the high number of bids correlates with a high number of suppliers per contract in the Medical Equipment sector but seems to differ widely in the Sewage Environmental Services sector Explanations for this pattern will require further research of how firms within these sectors operate and how oligopolistic monopolistic these sectors are Below is a histogram of the number of suppliers per

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/07/28/arrays-objects-trees/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Approaching Granularity: Connecting Open Aid and Open Contracting in Timor-Leste | Development Gateway
    a tender to build these roads If transparency exists in both the aid and contracting process then citizens could follow the process all the way from project conception to implementation on the ground by different companies To see a real world example of such a link I searched through both Timor Leste s eProcurement Portal and its Aid Transparency Portal examining a project sponsored by the Asian Development Bank ADB entitled the Road Network Upgrading Project The project seeks to upgrade over 70 km of roads across the country and create feasibility studies for the possible upgrading of 100 km of other roads in the future An example spreadsheet collected from Timor Leste s eProcurement database with a procurement associated with the ADB s Road Network Upgrading Project highlighted Within the eProcurement portal seven contracts exist related to the project with different bidders awarded different contracts in the process For instance in the component of the project which focuses on building a road between Natarbora and Laclubar the government s National Procurement Commission awarded China Nuclear Industry 22nd Construction Company 1 5 million for its construction Complete list of contracts awarded that are related to the Road Network Upgrading Project RNUP Below is a time series map showing the progress of the ADB s road project created by geo locating each contract associated with the project in the subdistricts where the road will be upgraded Because the contracts do not show the flow of money across specific subdistricts each contract s cost is split equally between the affected subdistricts While creating this map I found it difficult to figure out if certain contracts were related to specific aid projects as the overwhelming majority of contracts do not display their affiliation with parent projects For a donor officer government official or

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/06/23/approaching-granularity/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Open Data: A Journey of Discovery in Nepal | Development Gateway
    improve development outcomes and end poverty It can empower citizens to advocate for change help ensure their needs are reflected in public policy and drive quality and provision of public services And it contributes to transparency and accountability of resource flows Everyone is able to see what is being spent where and on what This short documentary follows the journey of journalist Gyanu Sharma in Nepal who understands that having access to data can help him create a better future for his son He is one of a growing number of citizens and civil society groups globally who have a hunger for data because they understand its powerful potential for change But current barriers are severely hindering the use and impact of open data There is limited data currently available its quality is poor and it can be difficult or impossible to compare and combine Gyanu s story brings to life the vital role of data in development and shows what work still needs to be done If you produce data publish it If you have data use it If you don t have data demand it This film was produced by AidData Development Initiatives and Publish What You Fund

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/06/04/open-data-journey-discovery-nepal/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Post-Cartagena: Mapping out the Data Ecosystem | Development Gateway
    that will need to be held at a global regional local level There are a lot of elements that go into creating the ideal data ecosystem If I had to give a definition of a healthy data ecosystem it would be one where government civil society and development partners in many cases the private sector and citizens work cohesively to produce important data in a timely matter that becomes publicly available All of these players would have a working level of data literacy in order to use the available information to effect positive change and policymakers within private public and foreign organizations would use data to make effective decisions for which the public could hold them accountable In order to create a healthy data ecosystem we first have to understand who our members are as well as their individual relationships to one another whether they have positive working relationships that support a cohesive data environment or if they undercut each other intentionally or otherwise Only with this understanding can we strengthen weak relationship to help the whole ecosystem flourish I decided to take a stab at mapping out what these relationships might be and the different influencing factors on each of them While this is not holistic and very much dependent on each country s situation it does give a good starting place Click on the bubbles to see influencing factors in these relationships Or click here to open the visualisation As we start to look at these relationships there are a couple things that stand out One is the need to strengthen government National Statistical Offices NSOs AidData s recent Marketplace of Ideas for Policy Change report found that assessments were more effective in influencing policymakers if they used data from the host government If government tends to use their own data for policy then it s imperative that NSOs have sufficient support to fulfill the data needs of the government and make their data available to public use This also begs the question of why governments don t value other sources of data as much is this a perception issue trust issue legally mandated or something else This question is key as it limits the data that can be used to influence government policy makers While citizen data CSO data and development partner data could provide valuable insights it won t have the impact desired if minimized by government officials In the diagram we also see that the private sector is for the most part cloistered off With the highest level of resources and ability to produce valuable tools and strengthen the economy the private sector is also the least likely to make their data public In addition to making their data open are there other ways that creating closer relationships between the private sector and government or other stakeholders could benefit society as a whole While there are several private sector companies who are already engaged in this type of support as seen by their involvement at

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/05/06/mapping-out-data-ecosystem/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Financing the Future 2015: Some Hits and Misses on the Future of Development Finance | Development Gateway
    the World Bank s IBRD arm were made during the event Aid is not dead but it is changing Perhaps the most surprising element of the conference was the strong focus on official development assistance ODA Strong calls were made for countries to fulfill their committed target of 0 7 of GDP and to direct more aid towards LDCs and fragile states A common refrain the critical role of the aid effectiveness agenda including prioritizing use of country systems programming ODA through national budgets increasing predictability and aligning assistance with national priorities Realistic expectations of private sector contributions to sustainable development During a speed geeking session Patrick Fine of FHI360 showed a striking chart demonstrating that while private sector flows are critical for middle income countries MICs least developed countries LDCs are still heavily dependent upon aid with over 50 of their external resources coming from ODA The ongoing debt challenges of the Government of Ghana a country that recently graduated to lower middle Income status underscored how predatory lending from the private sector can cause serious public financial management challenges for growing economies Perhaps the key change from years past was positioning ODA as a catalytic endeavor For example how can targeting assistance to strengthen a country s tax system improve domestic resource mobilization or help identify bankable projects to attract complementary private sector financing What was missing Building without BRICS Having a FfD discussion with no direct engagement from the BRICS particularly China is sadly not surprising in 2015 However while China s literal absence was expected its relative absence from the discussion and from the FfD draft document was a surprise When China was mentioned it was largely as a caricature of easy money attempting to take advantage of Africa s natural resources rather than as a legitimate development partner providing tens of billions of dollars in assistance per year Case in point walking from the conference venue to our hotel past Burma Camp Road one saw the repaving project being supervised by several Chinese foremen China aiddata org shows over 4 billion USD in funding from China to Ghana from 2010 2013 alone If we re going to be serious about FfD in Africa China needs to be taken more seriously into consideration if not present in the negotiations themselves There were some calls during the event to recognize China s development contributions particularly their investments in road and railroad infrastructure yet the discussion also centered on how to ensure China is accountable for what they finance This dialogue will likely not succeed in bringing them to the table and ensuring their voice is factored in the upcoming negotiations The Data Revolution Quite surprisingly the issues of monitoring the sustainable development goals SDGs and building statistical capacity came up only once throughout the conference in passing The most recent estimates from the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network UNSDSN Open Data Watch and others suggest that at least another 200 million per year will be needed

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/04/23/financing-the-future-2015-some-hits-and-misses-on-the-future-of-development-finance/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Geo-Enabling Development Assistance in Niger | Development Gateway
    and viewing more or less advanced geospatial data that are implemented by institutions of the Government and the country partners Beginning this September Development Gateway as part of the AidData partnership will begin geolocating all development projects in Niger totalling approximately 700 projects and almost US 2 billion from 2010 2015 This will involve the collection of geographic data about ongoing development projects down to the local level Funded by USAID Higher Education Solutions Network this work aims to make information on financing for development more functional by providing georeferenced information through interactive maps Among other things this will allow for further analysis of the geographical distribution of interventions and will facilitate the efforts of stakeholders to monitor aid flows and assess their effectiveness in the Nigerian context Context Since 2009 the Government of Niger has had an Aid Management Platform AMP Plateforme de Gestion de l Aide or PGA in French a web based aid information management system to improve the coordination of development aid in Niger This platform collects information about all projects financed in whole or in part by the technical and financial partners of Niger in all sectors Géolocalisation de l Aide au Développement bientôt le tour du Niger Sous financement de l Agence Américaine pour le Développement International USAID et la Banque Africaine de Développement BAD le Gouvernement du Niger Ministère du Plan de l Aménagement du Territoire et du Développement Communautaire MPATDC a décidé avec l appui de Development Gateway d acquérir une version plus récente de la Plateforme de Gestion de l Aide PGA incluant un Système d Information Géographique SIG permettant de géolocaliser les projets au Niger et aussi de renforcer les capacités du MPATDC et en particulier de la Direction Générale du Plan DGP pour utiliser au mieux cet outil informatique ce qui permettra notamment de tirer profit des fonctionnalités avancées d analyse de l aide internationale fournie au Niger À travers son partenariat avec AidData et sa collaboration avec le Ministère du Plan de l Aménagement du Territoire et du Développement Communautaire MPATDC Development Gateway a conduit une mission en Mars 2015 à Niamey au Niger où il était question de présenter le module de géolocalisation aux acteurs du développement ministères agences du Gouvernement Partenaires Techniques et Financiers multilatéraux et bilatéraux etc d évaluer l existant et les besoins en termes de collecte gestion et visualisation des données relatives à l aide au développement Les résultats de l évaluation ont fait état d une motivation et d un enthousiasme de la part des acteurs rencontrés notamment pour le module de géolocalisation qui devrait aider à mieux coordonner et répartir géographiquement les interventions des uns et des autres dans le souci d une meilleur planification et d une gestion efficace de l aide au développement L initiative aura aussi l avantage de pouvoir s appuyer sur des prémisses en l occurrence des systèmes de collecte et de visualisation de données géo spatiales plus ou moins avancés qui sont mis en œuvre

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/08/25/geoenabling-development-assistance-niger/ (2016-02-15)
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  • IATI and Country Systems: DG Working Paper | Development Gateway
    of IATI data in 5 Aid Management Program AMP countries Burkina Faso Chad Cote d Ivoire Madagascar and Senegal During the past several months we have performed a rigorous analysis of IATI data quality resulting in the selection of 5 IATI publishers to be imported into country systems Typically this import resulted in additions of hundreds of millions of dollars of additional aid flow data which were previously blind spots for partner country governments The chart below illustrates how IATI data integration for 5 selected publishers expands the coverage of Burkina Faso s AMP by over US 600 000 during the period from 2012 2014 This expanded coverage clearly illustrates the opportunity for IATI to make a significant contribution to resource management and development coordination while maintaining strong domestic ownership of country systems Additional benefits for government AIMS users could in the form of time saved especially as data quality improve and additional development partners DPs can have their reporting moved from manual to automated IATI processes However for this potential to be realized several enhancements to both the IATI standard and existing IATI data quality must be made Many of these enhancements are discussed in this working paper with further suggestions to be made in a second paper following the in country implementation phase of this program The methodology used in analyzing data for appropriate fit in country systems included the following steps Step 1 Identification of key fields for country use Step 2 Comparison of aggregate financials in IATI and AMP Step 3 Assessment of data completion in priority fields Step 4 Assessment of reporting timeliness and frequency Step 5 Selection of IATI publishers for import into country systems Suggested enhancements to the IATI standard include Inclusion of an on off budget indicator field in the standard Possible

    Original URL path: http://www.developmentgateway.org/2015/05/21/iati-and-country-systems-dg-working-paper/ (2016-02-15)
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