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    give results for the individual keywords introduced A semantic engine like MESH will analyse the query first and then give relevant results for the actual meaning of the query The EU funded MESH project sought to create a platform that integrated the state of the art in semantic search technologies and all the necessary tools to develop a working platform But while the team s achievements are impressive there is a length of road to travel before they are ready for universal search by everyday surfers like you and I Still the platform proves the technology in two restricted news domains natural disasters and civil unrest and street violence and it has led to many useful working applications and potential commercialisation opportunities We developed a manual annotation tool to create manageable annotations for all types of media and it is a very strong program that is easy to use explains Pedro Concejero coordinator of the MESH project This tool could become a commercial product he predicts The search for relevance One partner of the project Deutsche Welle a German TV station created a dossier developing tool called Full Story This remarkable program can help a video editor link to video audio and text relevant to a particular topic The editor can then assemble these diverse elements into a dossier For example a dossier about flooding might assemble media outlining the mechanics of flooding the impact of changing weather patterns and the effect on lowland and populous areas TV stations do this type of feature all the time and typically it can take days sorting through media archives for useful material to assemble a compelling dossier The MESH project s automated annotation tool could be developed to work with user generated content But with the Full Story program an editor can

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/mesh-search-engines-to-dig-deeper-into-meaning/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    from decades of satellite images of forests was demonstrated at the UN climate conference in Copenhagen We hope this technology will help stop the destruction of the world s rapidly disappearing forests said a statement on the Google org blog Emissions from tropical deforestation are comparable to the emissions of all of the EU and are greater than those of all cars trucks planes ships and trains worldwide According to the Stern Review the report prepared for the British government in 2006 on the economics of climate change by Lord Nicholas Stern protecting the world s standing forests is a highly cost effective way to cut carbon emissions and mitigate climate change The UN mechanism to reduce deforestation is called Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries REDD a system whereby richer countries would provide financial incentives to protect forests in poorer nations For REDD to be successful however countries need ways to accurately monitor and report on the state of their forests In Google org s prototype software environmental authorities or NGOs interested in monitoring forests start with satellite images of their area and track how the size and shape of the tree cover has changed over time The software can processes the images to extract useful scientific and tracking information about how much the forests have changed For the analysis the Google org team worked with Greg Asner of Carnegie Institution for Science and Carlos Souza of Imazon Technology developed by Asner and Souza is used in Latin America to track changes in forest cover but mainstream use of the models has been slow due to lack of access to high quality satellite images and the computer power needed to carry out the analysis Google org s solution is to enhance the Asner and Souza

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/google-unveils-new-technology-to-save-worlds-forests/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    and only available with IBM but the company s intention is to take the project to market They are also developing versions for instant messaging and mobile devices Imagine if there was a tool built into the search engine which translated my search query into every language and then searched the entire world s websites n Fluent began in 2006 as one of 10 innovations sponsored by IBM s chairman Samuel J Palmisano The company decided that the language barrier was a key issue both for global businesses and companies with clients worldwide and so resolved to find ways of addressing the problem The core technology is work in progress but it is significantly advanced that for many languages we can do accurate translations says Roukos But IBM is not the only tech giant convinced that language is the next barrier to be broken online and Google are currently working on a tool that will translate not only web pages but web searches as well At the moment Google only searches English words on web pages when given an English language query but the company hopes soon to be able to open up sites of any language to users Imagine what it would be like if there was a tool built into the search engine which translated my search query into every language and then searched the entire world s web sites Google s vice president Marissa Mayer told the UK s Daily Telegraph newspaper recently And then invoked the translation software a second and third time to not only then present the results in your native language but then translated those sites in full when you clicked through Away from the Internet NEC are hoping their new device the Tele Scouter will mean conversations won t get lost in translation Unveiled last November the device is a set of headsets and glasses that can automatically translate spoken words and display them on a tiny retinal display Still a prototype NEC believes it could be used by technicians to translate manuals Crowd sourcing to greater understanding Vernacular and jargon can be particularly problematic for translation software so n Fluent has been designed to learn from its mistakes and pick up specific terms used within IBM To do this the project has been opened up to all 400 000 staff working for IBM around the world and uses this crowd sourcing to access their expertise to feedback on the project Over a two week period in October last year IBM launched a worldwide translation challenge to its workforce which resulted in two million words of text being translated Incentives in the form of charitable donations and other prizes were offered to staff who took part Every single interface has a pop up window so if you happen to be bilingual you can make corrections David Lubensky an IBM specialist in the real time aspect of translation systems told CNN Many IBM ers have more than one language so we can get

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/new-tech-to-bridge-the-language-gap/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    unit called the Testery that used Colossus to crack codes We saw a number of messages signed by Adolf Hitler himself The code breakers at Bletchley had been seeing messages sent by German generals since the early days of the war Jerry Roberts shows how he deciphered German messages while a World War 2 code cracker for Britain I suspect sometimes we genuinely saw the messages before the blessed Germans said Captain Roberts To scramble or encipher the messages the Germans used the Lorenz SZ 40 42 coding machine known as Tunny to the Allies This was a more advanced machine than the well known Enigma and the Allies had no captured examples on which to try out code cracking techniques But they were able to break this code thanks to human error On 30 August 1941 a German operator sent a 4 000 character message twice made the cardinal sin of using the same settings and made small changes to the re sent text In what Captain Roberts described as the outstanding mental feat of the 20th Century mathematician Bill Tutte used the two messages to work out how Lorenz enciphered text Said Captain Roberts I used to see him twiddling his pencil staring into space and I wondered a few times if he was earning his corn but he clearly was Tutte s crack of the system helped the Allies decode the messages but soon too many messages were being intercepted for the human code crackers to handle Following the success of the machines produced to crack Enigma Bletchley decided to build another to crack Lorenz Broken up Overseeing it was post office engineer Tommy Flowers and much of the early design work was done at the post office s Dollis Hill research lab He worked with a select band of brothers There was about five of us initially said Harry Fensom who helped Flowers build the machine and oversaw its installation and operation at Bletchley We didn t think of it as a computer he said Because in those days a computer was simply a device for manipulating arithmetic Flowers wanted to use huge numbers of valves to power Colossus The wisdom of the decision was doubted because valves were prone to breaking But Flowers knew from his work on telephone exchanges that they can have a long life if they are kept running It is switching them on and off that renders them friable Colossus Mark I had 1 500 valves and was delivered to Bletchley in late January 1944 and was cracking codes within a fortnight Flowers belief in the longevity of valves was proved because some of the valves dating from the Second World War are in the re built Colossus now installed back at Bletchley The oldest valve in the re built Colossus dates from 1943 said Tony Sale who oversaw the 14 year rebuild project In total he estimates about 40 of its valves date from the 1940s About 5 to 8

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/computer-that-cracked-nazi-code/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    countries mobile based learning in Bangladesh laptops for kids in Brazil and a futuristic classroom in UK From the abacus to the Apple Mac technology has constantly changed the way we learn In equal measure the needs of education have provided the driving force behind some of our most significant technological innovations BBC World Service programme Digital Planet explored three of the many unique initiatives in education technology BANGLADESH MOBILE ENGLISH Image Credits BBC Bangladesh Mobile English Most classrooms in the world would insist on having students turn their mobiles off but one scheme in Bangladesh is very much about keeping them on The Janala service created by the BBC s development charity the World Service Trust gives anyone with a mobile the chance to learn English simply by calling a number and listening in Mobile telecommunication is the fastest growing industry in Bangladesh and the Janala service has already logged over 400 000 calls We can t carry a dictionary everywhere said one Bangladeshi student But now we can carry a mobile phone which helps us learn BRAZIL ONE LAPTOP PER CHILD Image Credits BBC Brazil One Laptop Per Child The One Laptop Per Child OLPC project was announced in 2005 The 100 laptop was intended to provide rugged technology to students in some of the world s poorest areas Although falling short of its initial ambitious targets of connecting millions of children the OLPC project is being well received in the developing world despite never becoming quite as cheap as 100 However some countries have taken the project to heart The government of Uruguay has bought a laptop for every child whilst the state of La Rioja in Argentina has also said that it will purchase the machines for its pupils In Brazil the government has bought 150

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/innovating-technology-for-education/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    services to an even greater and diverse clientele Many governments invested heavily in telecentres during the 1990s and early 2000s Similarly multilateral and international aid organisations decided to support the expansion and deployment of computers to rural areas Most of these initiatives however lacked proper long term sustainability plans or proper guidelines for service development As a result many of these first projects were cancelled and the technological infrastructure was often lost Still many of these models evolved In some cases the local organisations in charge of these centres developed alliances with non profits academia and other specialised organisations which led to the emergence of a new model Telecentre 2 0 Diversity There are many examples of telecentres becoming hubs for community development and empowerment centres where the community as a whole finds and learns new skills and where the private sector has an opportunity to participate in the future delivery of products and services to a very diverse population Telecentres today tend to be highly specialised and yet continue to provide basic ICT literacy training Even though people have increasingly sophisticated and advanced needs and interests regarding ICT there is always a need for basic training among sectors of the population We now see a wide range of telecentres from very humble training centres in rural India to state of the art innovation centres in urban Barcelona telecentres that support farmers in rural Africa and Asia to telecentres specialising in women s issues and children s education telecentres that have embraced the opportunities of entrepreneurialism in Brazil to telecentres that provide a chance for retirees to enter the digital age in Europe Telecentres have evolved into a global community of ICT hubs with a strong social mission and strong motivation to continuously search for innovation and new opportunities My

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/telecentre-a-global-community-of-ict-hub/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    Deputy Ministers of Education and ICT from Benin Cameroon Kenya Namibia Niger and Uganda as well as representatives of Ministers of Education from Burkina Faso and Tanzania and representatives of Cote D Ivoire s Ministry of Post and Telecommunications It was noted that over the past four decades more people in Sub Saharan Africa have had access to education with the number of pupils enrolling in primary school having increased more than fivefold from 23 million in 1970 to 129 million in 2008 The growth is a reflection not merely of the increase in population size but of the efforts by governments to provide Education for All The sharpest increase has been in the enrolment figures for higher education Forty years ago tertiary enrolment stood at two hundred thousand in 2008 4 5 million people in Sub Saharan Africa were enrolled at tertiary institutions Despite this growth the average public expenditure on higher education in Sub Saharan Africa has not only fallen but lags behind the rest of the world because donor aid for education in Africa has been in decline in recent years At the same time proportionally more public expenditure has been allocated to basic education relative to higher education The Ministers focused their discussion on new ways to finance education in the face of dwindling resources and rising demand In this respect reference was made to the importance of shifting away from donor dependency as a crucial determinant of self reliance and financial sustainability The Ministers highlighted that on average public education institutions are now generating about 30 per cent of their own income Uganda is just one of the countries which are implementing dual track tuition policies whereby a certain number of free or very low cost university places are awarded based on criteria such as

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/spotlight/africa-needs-a-better-sustainable-financing-strategy-for-its-education-system/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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    mobile phone is much more suited to a lot of these environments in some cases than a computer or a laptop or an Internet connection because it doesn t use a lot of power At the AED Satellife Center for Health Information and Technology staff members work with local and international nongovernmental organizations to develop mobile data collection and dissemination tools Andrew Sideman Satellife s associate center director says many regions of developing countries do not have reliable access to the Internet or even electricity One of the reasons that we were interested in using PDAs and now mobile phones is that they are very stingy with power Sideman said Because the batteries can last for seven or eight hours between charges and then they charge very quickly from a solar charger we can circumvent the issues of not having a strong electric grid infrastructure Despite limitations in Internet and electricity access most developing countries have some degree of mobile phone coverage According to the UN Foundation about 80 of the world s population lives in a region with mobile phone coverage and about 64 of all mobile phone users live in the developing world Brown explained that many people in developing countries already possess mobile phones and are familiar with basic functions such as making phone calls and sending text messages Therefore he said it doesn t take long to train people to use new mobile phone applications such as Internet browsers or information systems Turning Mobile Phones into Health Solutions According to Brown effective health system management requires active communication about regional health trends and medical needs He said When we look at health IT systems that have been successful it s really where they have been integrated horizontally and systematically so that a single piece of information is collected once and then used for all sorts of different purposes For example mobile health tools could improve clinic management facilitate disease surveillance and enable clinical research Brown said At Satellife staff members are leveraging mobile phone applications to help health care workers access clinical research and collect information for local health ministries For example the organization s GUIDE system converts large clinical documents into formats that are easily readable on the small screens of mobile devices Sideman says the system allows physicians and nurses in developing countries to access current medical research and literature The idea was to put it on a device that was small enough so that they could carry it around with them during their working day he said Meanwhile Satellife s GATHER system is an open source mobile phone application that allows health care workers to electronically submit reports to district health centers or health ministries Officials then can use the data to monitor health trends or diseases in a particular region Mobile phone technology is advancing so rapidly that the cost of using these devices in the developing world is falling every year Sideman says Satellife also is working with health information exchanges

    Original URL path: http://www.digitalopportunity.org/comments/mobile-technologies-revolutionising-ehealth/?searchterm= (2016-02-17)
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