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  • Direction: Current Research
    Forgiveness Among Believers Dyck David Christian Vocation in the Third Age Fast Karen The Sin of Obedience Ferreira Sonia Jesus and the Caring Missions Challenge Fifield Mary Anne Christian Codependents The Church s Misguided Servants Foth Alfred A Study in Church Growth Friesen David The Battle for the Mind The Deception of Satan Heidebrecht Sherry God The Adoptive Parent Hershey Bergen Julie The Unclean Transformed Janzen Harold Jerusalem Koinonia A Model for the Cell Group Church Janzen Viktor Redemptive Church Discipline Kidner Dianne The Church Restoring Victims of Violence Kinabrew Bruce The Relationship Between Prayer and the Holy Spirit in Luke 69 Klassen Randy Hearing the Voice of Creation Klassen Steve Times of Refreshing Loewen Wendell Making Peace in the Face of Conflict Martens Kathleen A Theology of Aging Metz Ken Fearing God and Loving Him More Penner Dawn The Power of the Curse Penner Ross Holiness A Transforming Distinctive Pritchard Jon Conversion Demands Discipleship The Church s Missing Link Reimer Bruce The Power of a Metaphor The Burden of Shame in the Unconscious Ruble Jody All I Ever Needed to Know I Learned in Galatians Schmidt Lori Empowered for Ministry Through Brokenness Siemens Julie The Anger of Christ Siemens

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/current-research.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Earthkeeping in the 90's: Stewardship of Creation
    Earthkeeping updates such scientific topics as the greenhouse effect ozone layer toxic wastes rain forest destruction and oil spills Also examined are cultural and religious developments the Gaia hypothesis Deep Ecology the New Age movement animal rights speciesism environment and economics and ecofeminism A useful summary of guiding principles and an appendix entitled What You Can Do follow a survey of Biblical teachings about creation and stewardship The revised bibliography along with the indexes of subjects names and Scriptural references is valuable to anyone studying the relationship between Christianity and the environment The Environment and the Christian is based on papers presented at the 1989 AuSable Forum at the AuSable Institute of Environmental Studies Mancelona Michigan Seven authors with scientific and theological backgrounds present essays that relate Scripture to major environmental problems Between DeWitt s preface and epilogue are five essays 71 Christ as Creator and Redeemer Loren Wilkinson Christ as the Second Adam Ronald Manahan Christ s Resurrection and the Creation s Vindication Raymond C van Leeuwen The Kingdom of God and Stewardship of Creation Gordon Zerbe and Creation s Care and Keeping in the Life of Jesus Vernon Visick David Wise presents a Review of Environmental Stewardship Literature and the New Testament as an appendix New Testament implications are explained in a way that adds perspective to the more frequently discussed Old Testament commands The major themes Christ as Creator and Seek the Kingdom answer to species extinction global toxification habitat destruction and cultural subversion Rightness and integrity are the cornerstones of this perspective Both Calvin DeWitt University of Wisconsin and Loren Wilkinson are respected scholars in scientific and theological circles and the other authors and team members have all been active in addressing questions of faith and the environment Of note to Mennonite readers are the names

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/earthkeeping-in-90s-stewardship-of.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: The Environment and the Christian: What Can We Learn from the New Testament?
    and an economist Earthkeeping updates such scientific topics as the greenhouse effect ozone layer toxic wastes rain forest destruction and oil spills Also examined are cultural and religious developments the Gaia hypothesis Deep Ecology the New Age movement animal rights speciesism environment and economics and ecofeminism A useful summary of guiding principles and an appendix entitled What You Can Do follows a survey of Biblical teachings about creation and stewardship The revised bibliography along with the indexes of subjects names and Scriptural references is valuable to anyone studying the relationship between Christianity and the environment The Environment and the Christian is based on papers presented at the 1989 AuSable Forum at the AuSable Institute of Environmental Studies Mancelona Michigan Seven authors with scientific and theological backgrounds present essays that relate Scripture to major environmental problems Between DeWitt s preface and epilogue are five essays Christ as Creator and Redeemer Loren Wilkinson Christ as the Second Adam Ronald Manahan Christ s Resurrection and the Creation s Vindication Raymond C van Leeuwen The Kingdom of God and Stewardship of Creation Gordon Zerbe and Creation s Care and Keeping in the Life of Jesus Vernon Visick David Wise presents a Review of Environmental Stewardship Literature and the New Testament as an appendix New Testament implications are explained in a way that add perspective to the more frequently discussed Old Testament commands The major themes Christ as creator and Seek the Kingdom answer to species extinction global toxification habitat destruction and cultural subversion Rightness and integrity are the cornerstones of this perspective Both Calvin DeWitt University of Wisconsin and Loren Wilkinson are respected scholars in scientific and theological circles and the other authors and team members have all been active in addressing questions of faith and the environment Of note to Mennonite readers are

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/environment-and-christian-what-can-we.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Earthkeepers: Environmental Perspectives on Hunger, Poverty and Injustice
    gained as teachers and more recently as workers with Mennonite Central Committee They do so in a style geared for general audiences with questions at the end of chapters to facilitate group discussions and with references to encourage further investigation into the numerous topics addressed Earthkeepers is arranged into five parts with the first part providing the theological justification for Christian environmental concern Here the authors emphasize the concept of ecojustice which combines the concept of ecological living with that of economic justice for the earth and all of its people Human redemption is seen within a context of God s plan of redemption for all creation The second part provides the environmental justification for action as the litany of global ecological ills is recounted Earthkeepers begins in the third section to speak with a more distinctive voice Reflecting the MCC priorities which Earthkeepers represents environmental issues are linked to military spending armed conflict economic worldviews poverty and population Considering the close relationship Mennonites have historically held with the land it is appropriate that the final two parts of the book deal with issues of farming food and agriculture For those concerned with scientific accuracy there are occasional misleading statements These do not compromise the worth of the book in a general setting but may require some comment if used academically And due to the book s attention to such a broad range of issues chapters within the sections tend to be short and choppy This may make it more usable for group study and reflection but renders it annoying to those desiring a progressive flow of ideas Nevertheless the perspectives and priorities of its MCC authors make this an appealing book To a culture in which painless acts such as recycling bottles are trumpeted as a means of restoring

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/earthkeepers-environmental-perspectives.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Remember Lot's Wife and Other Unnamed Women of the Bible
    small role in a larger story The point that April Yamasaki makes is that because women are unnamed they have been unmentioned and unremembered women even though their contribution made a difference in history April Yamasaki introduces us to fifty of these unnamed women through devotional meditations She includes the good and the bad the familiar and the unfamiliar those who lived with hope and joy and those who lived with despair and sadness The reader learns about Job s wife the Queen of Sheba the woman in the Song of Solomon and many others They each have their own stories to tell and their own lessons to teach us Yamasaki expands on Edith Deene s extensive section of about one hundred unnamed women in All the Women of the Bible by adding more historical and religious background information and a meditation on the Scripture an application and a prayer The goal of the book is to enrich faith as well as bring the reader to a deeper appreciation of these women of the Bible The book will be useful for small groups or individual study both men and women Ministers looking for material on these women will also find it helpful The material is well researched and well presented so that it is easily accessible to readers I have one frustration however with the Table of Contents In my library I have several valuable books with chapters each dealing with a different character or a biblical text Yet the Table 74 of Contents lists each one only with an enigmatic title Because this book has chapter headings such as The Word of the Lord or Glory to God which give little or no clue to their content I add this book to those frustrating books Unless as I work

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/remember-lots-wife-and-other-unnamed.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Understanding Sikhs and Their Religion: A Christian Perspective
    the author then describes the Sikh value system and draws some distinctions between Sikhs and Hindus and Sikhs and Muslims Raj is pastor of Hindi Punjab Gospel Chapel Mennonite Brethren in Vancouver B C Sikhs conceive of God as the Creator as omnipresent and as outside Time Although Sikhs may refer to God by Hindu and Moslem names for God Sikhs reject other aspects of Hinduism and Islam such as the use of religious images or idols facing a particular direction to pray and the wearing of certain religious symbols The Sikh religion formed in reaction to some aspects of Hinduism accepts some Hindu beliefs such as karma and the cycle of reincarnation The Sikh word for God is Wah Guru which translates as Wondrous Teacher The word Sikh means disciple and the Sikh religion centers around one God perceived as the supreme Truth Sikhs date their discipleship from ten gurus whose teachings span a period from A D 75 1469 to A D 1708 One may draw certain parallels to Judaic beliefs such as obedience to the Law and righteous living For example a Sikh may know God which is to say become closer to God through knowledge of God s truth as shown in the teachings of the gurus and by applying these teachings to life Meditation and hymn singing are important Indeed the Sikh scripture known as the Granth Sahib is described as being arranged in musical measures and consists of hymns of the first five and of the ninth gurus The Granth Sahib may be likened to certain of the Psalms which are more meaningfully sung than recited and probably like the Psalms comprises an oral tradition which may be quite ancient The North American seeking to carry the Word to the Sikh community will appreciate

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/understanding-sikhs-and-their-religion.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Flammen unausloeschlich: Mission der Mennoniten unter Zaren und Sowjets, 1789-1989
    witness and as crossing boundaries Repeatedly Kasdorf relies on missiologist Gensichen s notion of dimension in mission the divine provision leading to intention human implementation Two chapters set the stage for mission during 1789 to 1860 In the prehistory stage 1789 1835 the Mennonites missed choice opportunities for mission in their varied response to the manifesto of Catherine II Yet Russian Bible societies and evangelical missionaries from West Europe working among nearby tribal groups fanned the potential flame for mission The awakening in subsequent years 1835 1860 through influences of Wilhelm Lange Tobias Voth and Eduard Wuest led to the birth of the Mennonite Brethren a more likely mission movement In four further chapters Kasdorf highlights the mission thinking and expression during the years 1860 1917 alleging that there was more mission by Mennonites in these 57 years than in the previous 300 Mennonite Brethren MB targeted other Mennonites Lutherans and eventually orthodox Russians despite the manifesto which forbade the same The General Conference Mennonites observed the manifesto and concentrated on overseas mission and witness through lifestyle Kasdorf highlights the itinerant preaching among both groups Here one might question why Kasdorf has not included the dynamic itinerant preaching among the Allianz movement neither GC or MB In terms of overseas mission the GCs had a head start with Heinrich Dirks going to Sumatra in 1869 The MBs followed twenty years later with Abram Friesen going to India The flame of mission was unquenchable In three further chapters Kasdorf features the golden age of mission opportunity 1917 1929 a time of great activity and sacrifice Here was the first real breakthrough to the people groups of Russia after the tie with India was broken In a context of revolution civil war and famine the tent mission courageously responded to great spiritual

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/flammen-unausloeschlich-mission-der.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Menno Simons: A Reappraisal
    whether the academic lecture hall is the best venue for such a task pg 52 Helmut Isaak looks at what Menno has to say about the Kingdom of God First we are told that Menno uses the language of the new Jerusalem when speaking of the kingdom Entry into the life of the kingdom begins with repentance regeneration and then baptism While it was theoretically possible to Menno for the new Jerusalem to come within the framework of the Catholic church he later realized that a new church was necessary Peter Visser gives us an overview of the history of the publication of Menno Simon s writings In the book s last chapter Walter Klaassen summarizes and evaluates the research and writings about Menno s life and teachings Marjan Blok also walks us through Dat Fundament searching for Menno s teachings on discipleship Blok identifies a correlation between the Catholic and Anabaptist views on discipleship While salvation comes through the work of Christ alone there is a distinct emphasis on the fruits of repentance Abraham Friesen deals with the relationship between Menno and the Muensterites He engages in a lengthy argument as to whether or not Menno wrote a tract called The Blasphemy Unfortunately Friesen does not break up his chapter into subheadings as other contributors to this book do This makes it difficult for the reader to follow the different parts of the argument Friesen concludes that Menno did write the tract coming to his conclusions independently of other prevailing opinions In chapter eight Irvin Horst analyzes the importance placed on Menno Simons by North Americans who stand in the Mennonite tradition In looking at the past he finds his evidence in the history of the publication of Menno s works In looking at the present he examines Menno

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/21/2/menno-simons-reappraisal.html (2016-02-16)
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