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  • Direction: The Ethics of Evangelism: A Philosophical Defense of Proselytizing and Persuasion
    down his book into two main sections The first defensive in nature encompasses the first six chapters Here Thiessen addresses common objections to proselytizing His concern is to guide the reader in distinguishing between the legitimate practice of proselytizing and the coercive means that have tarnished it In the second section Thiessen is on the offensive presenting a series of arguments that intend to depict proselytizing as a legitimate and moral endeavor His aim is to develop a set of criteria that would make for ethical proselytizing Thiessen s goal is to overcome the view that regards proselytizing as an inherently evil practice Thiessen writes There is all the difference in the world between brainwashing and a lover gently and carefully trying to persuade his beloved to marry him Proselytizing Thiessen argues is an innately human practice with the potential to be an expression of human 111 dignity the desire to communicate and show care and concern for others Religious proselytizing is one expression among many of the human proclivity to engage in persuasion We like to argue claims Thiessen We like to persuade others of our point of view On issues very dear to our hearts we want others to be like us to share what has given us meaning and purpose in living Not all forms of proselytizing are ethical yet can be considered honorable when guided by the virtues Thiessen s work is undeniably a necessity given the antagonistic culture the Western church finds itself in Amidst secular society s hurt and confusion in relation to the church and its malpractices this book is a vital move towards gaining a sense of clarity for evangelism Thiessen runs into a significant challenge however in his aim to make his appeal through a liberal secular ethical framework His conception

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/42/1/ethics-of-evangelism-philosophical.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: This Hidden Thing
    Maria exemplifies the Mennonite work ethic quickly learning the English language and the demands of the Lowry household Of course she sends her earnings to her family struggling to establish themselves on a farm in southern Manitoba Her determination to understand the new cultural and social expectations her loneliness and separation from her family and her growing desires as a young woman draw Maria into emotionally contending situations The novel is divided into two parts the first gives an account of Maria s five years of experiences working for the Lowry household the second traces the next five decades of Maria s life Dueck s novel does not merely follow a fictional plot she has set her rich engaging characters into a historical place and time The Mennonite immigrants must not only learn to adapt to their new environment but also deal with the hardships brought on by significant historical events such as the Great Depression World War II and the Winnipeg flood of 1950 The Mary Martha house a meeting place for fun fellowship and spiritual encouragement in the north end of Winnipeg is another example of Dueck s historical research She draws into the narrative perspectives 113 and stories of other Mennonite domestics for both reader and Maria to hear Young women openly share their struggles with varied consequences advice emotional support for breakdowns or rejection for confessing pregnancy Maria works hard at maintaining personal privacy and uses silence to grow her inner fortitude She chooses her stories and memories carefully when writing letters to her family Taking on the role of narrator she selectively arranges the words on a page to re construct her identity This re construction of the self is particularly clear in the opening lines of the second section of the novel Now how

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/42/1/this-hidden-thing.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Faculty Publications 2012
    2012 10 13 CMU Faire face à la tempête interprétative Le Lien 29 Hiver 2012 20 22 CMU He Never Meant for Us to Die An Incursion into Genesis 1 3 Direction 41 Spring 2012 42 56 CMU 117 The Song of Solomon What is it Good for Qur an and Injil Reflections on Qur anic texts and Commentary blog 2012 10 16 http quranandinjil org node 142 CMU The Spirit of the Lord Power to Face the World The Messenger February 2012 12 14 CMU Guenther Bruce L Charting a Course A Voyage into Evangelical Anabaptism Past and Present Mennonite Brethren Herald February 2012 16 17 MBBSC Heidebrecht Luke Journeys in Bangladesh Journal of European Baptist Studies 13 no 1 2012 27 48 BC Jost Lynn and Valerie G Rempel Church and School Compañeros in Biblical and Church History Direction 41 Fall 2012 214 25 FPBS Kelly S P Andrew Sensenig et al Damping Capacity is Evolutionarily Conserved in the Radial Silk of Orb Weaving Spiders Zoology 114 2011 233 38 TC Kostlevy William Conquerors After All Keswick A Misunderstood Tradition Reflections A Publication of the Missionary Church Historical Society 13 14 2011 2012 65 72 TC Li Changying Norman E Schmidt and Ron Gitaitis Detection of Onion Postharvest Diseases by Analyses of Headspace Volatiles Using a Gas Sensor Array and GC MS LWT Food Science and Technology 44 2011 1019 25 TC Matties Gordon You Save Humans and Animals Alike O Lord The Messenger October 2012 14 16 CMU Ottoson Robin Deich The Battle Over the Flag Protest Community Opposition and Silence in the Mennonite Colleges in Kansas During the Vietnam War Journal of Church and State 52 Fall 2010 686 711 TC Ridd Karen Peace Camps in Quebec and Manitoba to Support the Mohawks in the Oka Crisis Canada 1990 Global Nonviolent Action Database http nvdatabase swarthmore edu content peace camps quebec and manitoba support mohawks oka crisis canada 1990 CMU 118 Sensenig Andrew T S P Kelly K A Lorentz and T A Blackledge Spider Orb Webs Rely on Radial Threads to Absorb Prey Kinetic Energy Proceedings of the Royal Society Interface 9 73 2012 1880 91 TC Unger Walter Substitution The Sure Foundation of Atonement Direction 41 Spring 2012 4 17 CBC Pilgrim in Progress A Personal Reflection Mennonite Brethren Herald January 2012 12 13 CBC Wiebe Katie Funk Aganeta Janzen Block 1906 2000 Heroine of the Faith in the Former Soviet Union CMBS Newsletter 32 Fall 2011 1 7 TC Wollf Randy P Confessions of a Naked Anabaptist A Seminary Professor s Evangelical Anabaptist Journey Mennonite Brethren Herald February 2012 11 MBBSC Wollf Randy P and Yuttasak Sirikul Reaching Thailand in this Generation The Thai Church s National Plan Evangelical Missions Quarterly 48 July 2012 322 28 MBBSC OTHER Koop Karl ed Vision A Journal for Church and Theology 13 Spring 2012 Issue focus The Holy Spirit and the Christian Life CMU DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS Klassen Michael The Missing C of the ABC s of

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/42/1/faculty-publications-2012.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: From the Editor: Church and School: Compañeros
    ongoing tensions On the one hand CMU is viewed with suspicion by some secular academics who question the ability of a religious university to produce real scholarship or to offer faculty true academic freedom and on the other it is never fully trusted by some Mennonite constituents who are scandalized by the willingness of faculty to raise critical questions about church practices and beliefs or to engage non Christian thinkers in serious conversation CMU is almost always being criticized by someone Even so there is no thought either by the conferences or the schools of ending the relationship Both CMU and its Mennonite church sponsors recognize that their relationships are mutually beneficial But there is always room for improvement The joint addresses given by David Wiebe former executive director of the Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches and Gerald Gerbrandt president of CMU now retired are wish lists of a sort Wiebe identifies what churches wish the college or university might do or be more mindful of while Gerbrandt discusses what kinds of assistance a church based school like CMU wishes from its supporting churches These discussions illuminate persistent church and school issues in helpful ways In their introductory paper Lynn Jost and Valerie Rempel organize their thoughts on Christian education around the narrative of creation human rebellion and the new community arguing that Christian education takes on its fuller significance against the backdrop of this forward looking meta narrative Alfred Neufeld follows up by considering whether describing the mission of church and school as growing people of God adequately sums up the scope of God s mission And do we know enough to say what guidance the Anabaptist Mennonite Brethren tradition might give us as we accept that mission Johann Matties offers practical thoughts on how best to educate

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/41/2/editorial.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Church and School: Compañeros in Biblical and Church History
    emerged during the monarchy Prophets warned of the consequences of imperial hegemony When David grasped imperial power Nathan declared to him You are the man Elijah said of Ahab when he became an imperial land grabber You are the troubler of Israel Jeremiah reminded Shallum Jehoiakim that to know Yahweh is to do justice and righteousness not to exercise imperial prerogatives which oppress the marginalized Israel s insistence on imitating empire results in exile The biblical analysis of the imperial reign of Solomon highlights power via wisdom sustained critical reflection on lived experience in order to discern the hidden shape of reality in daily life family tribal wisdom à wisdom of the school and court to manage and master others international reputation and competition success wealth via wisdom international commercial trade in arms and luxury items taxation cheap labor royal military bureaucracy wisdom vis à vis Torah obedience the uncompromising if of covenant 1 Kings 3 14 1 Kings 6 12 13 1 Kings 9 6 indictment and sentence royal compromise violates Torah land loss choosing death covenantal faith public power Part II Valerie With the conversion of Constantine and the legalization and even privileging of Christianity the church entered into a new relationship with the culture around it Increasingly shaped by imperial ideas and practices the alternative community that was centered on faithful discipleship to Jesus became Christendom with all the rights and privileges pertaining thereto The earliest monastics were men and women who fled the city in an effort to distance themselves from what they perceived as the compromises of the imperial church In the desert they could focus on prayer and the study of Scripture They frequently gathered around a teacher and gradually formed communities governed by a rule The community helped to form and sustain a Christian identity and allowed them access to the central rite of the church i e communion From the beginning early monastics were involved in education both their own and that of the children they took in Monastic communities were formed for both men and women and were deeply shaped by the practices of faith It was an embodied faith shaped by the cycle of prayers work worship study etc It was also a shared life a common life Significantly monasteries preserved knowledge and the texts through copying They developed the library resources that eventually fueled the Renaissance More formal schools developed within the structures of the church The churches served by bishops were called cathedrals and it was here that cathedral or episcopal schools were developed to train priests By the fourth and fifth centuries instruction was given over to a specialized clergy called the scholasticus Many of them had been teachers in other settings and by the ninth century helped shape an ever broadening curriculum that engaged the liberal arts in addition to the study of Scripture and theology These were the forerunners of the great universities Cathedral and episcopal schools tended to exert more influence than the monastic schools They were located in cities and trained not only clerics but also the next generation of teachers Many of them gave birth to the great universities of Europe In order to govern them bishops appointed chancellors to supervise teachers Over time teachers and students began seeking greater autonomy They formed guilds according to the model of the day Eventually the guild became the universitas and that term became exclusive to unions of faculties and students Gangel 109 From the twelfth century and following the university became the premier educational institution As Marvin Taylor points out this reflected the changing world the increasing importance of cities a rising middle class and one of the few positive results of the Crusades the encounter with the intellectual riches of the East Taylor 15 The curriculum was varied Theology continued as the Queen of the Sciences though scholars point out that the new ideas and the recovery or rediscovery of classical Greek thought created significant challenges as these were brought into conversation with established Christian doctrine Specialization began to occur Gangel 110 Schools became known for theology law or the liberal arts and could no longer be described as narrowly religious Taylor 15 Increasingly students were studying for the professions There was also a new student pool War is good for some economies In this period it helped spur commercial enterprises and urban growth that helped produce a middle class and that in turn made for more students The entire enterprise was becoming more sophisticated and this was reflected in both teachers and students The great universities were guarded by the church and its clerics and produced the great works of medieval theology e g the work of Anselm Abelard Duns Scotus and Aquinas But they adopted the model of the guild and became increasingly self governed The move toward self governance can also be read as a move away from the church Do we recognize similarities in the movement of our Bible schools to accredited universities It is important to remember that education has often been the means by which someone moves into the middle or even upper classes and that schools rely on the middle classes to provide students In some instances advanced education can produce a form of sophistication that may form an intellectual class How do we understand the benefits of this linkage between education and upward mobility What are the problems this poses Part III Lynn Third vantage point synthesis In exile Israel collects the Scriptures and develops a canonical community The Psalms which contemplate Torah God s instruction and celebrate Yahweh s kingship are compiled during and after exile Isaiah 40 66 and Jeremiah 30 31 offer comfort and hope of a new beginning a new exodus a renewed covenant The third way neither empire nor exiled describes the new community which constitutes the new covenant Through word and deed Jesus teaches about the kingdom of God which runs counter to the empire now a Roman political

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/41/2/church-and-school-companeros-in-biblical.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Church and School: Compañeros in Growing People of Faith in the Anabaptist-Mennonite Brethren Tradition
    of the family s mandate to educate and the goal of a Christian school is a theocentric worldview and a life that pleases God MB Mission schools Albert Schweitzer Gutenberg Our MB conference now operates three mission schools The driving forces here are church planting evangelism and Christian social responsibility The schools are successful but the results on the three goals are rather weak and we are in a process of refocusing Karl Barth versus G F Lessing Offenbarung versus Erziehung While studying in Basel and later in Fresno under Barth scholar Howard Loewen the theology of grace and revelation the principle of the unendlich qualitative Unterschied infinite qualitative difference between God and man the sharp critique of Lessing and Schleiermacher and their project of the Erziehung des Menschengeschlechts education of the human race impacted me profoundly Ever since I have wondered what it means to understand that the church is a miracle of grace and not an educational project or institution The Fresno Pacific College Idea Following the lead of the Christian college movement the Pacific College idea insisted on the unity of all knowledge under God and the correlate that there can be no ultimate contradiction between the truth of revelation and of scholarly investigation Toews Mennonite Idealisms 56 Nevertheless Delbert Wiens warns us that the typical model of the Christian college has been so deeply shaped by the Enlightenment version of the tree of good and evil that only a very profound rebaptism can reestablish its Christian relevance in a post modern world Toews Mennonite Idealisms 57 Juancito Sieber Impressions from Patagonia The Mennonite church in the southern part of Argentina is undergoing a remarkable renewal similar to what MBs experienced in southern Russia in the 1860s In February 2011 when I spent a week with them in Chuele Chuel and Neuquen I was impressed to see that church planting social assistance and development and a strong school movement are three simultaneous fruits of the spiritual and charismatic Argentinean renewal of the Anabaptist vision Juan Sieber conference president promoted a new mission effort in the southern city of Wiedma saying We have to go there so people will see how one lives the culture of the kingdom of heaven Church and school united to make visible to society the values paradigms and codes of the kingdom of God Sarmiento How to learn democracy Paraguay celebrates 200 years of independence in 2011 There has been a great desire for democracy but a tragic absence of it Nicanor Duarte Frutos in 2008 was the first democratic president willing to hand over power to the opposition party without blood shedding or revolution in these 200 years The great Argentinean educator Sarmiento has been quoted again and again in this celebration If people are the sovereign power of the nation then let us educate the sovereign eduquemos al soberano From a Christian perspective who educates for democracy Missions theology for media For the last decade I have been theological advisor and president of our conference board for media ministries Four radio stations an open TV station missions through cell phone and Facebook are part of the challenge It is fair to say that media might be as powerful an educational force as church family and school The challenge is to be present in media with a firm belief that the church is God s communication medium to the world and even more to make clear that the church not only delivers a message but that the medium is the message Johannes Harder Aufbruch ohne Ende Some time ago during a teaching week at Bienenberg in Basel I read the memoires of the legendary Johannes Harder in almost a single night An educator poet and novelist the Mennonitisches Jahrbuch editor was perhaps the only German Mennonite truly committed to the Kirchenkampf church struggle and the Bekennende Kirche Confessing Church during Germany s Nazi era He was also the personal spiritual father to the later German Bundespräsident Johannes Rau and a controversial peace activist at the Ostermarsch 1968 Im Land der Brüder Grimm regieren heute die Grimmigen Today the land of the brothers Grimm is ruled by the grim This non conforming unorthodox seeker of Anabaptist authenticity in culture politics and education continues to intrigue me Paul Mininger Mennonite World Conference 1952 What is Christian education It is impressive that as early as fifty years ago the MWC had already focused on the relation of Mennonite schools to the church The goal of Christian education is to form freie Menschen in Christus die in allen ihren Beziehungen in der menschlichen Gesellschaft den Willen Christi bezeugen free men and women in Christ who testify to the will of Christ in all their relationships in human society Bender 320 Then he develops six specific goals for a human being marked by Christian education His original nature is being transformed umgestaltet through the grace of God by a relationship of faith with the living Christ His life is marked by a complete surrender to the lordship of Christ and his one declared goal is to do the will of God in the world His life is energized and strengthened by agape which comes from God through Christ He is willing to participate enthusiastically and effectively in the work and fellowship of the redeeming congregation Erlösungsgemeinde He persistently presents God s message of agape to the world testifying to the gospel and the life of the church He is willing to contribute to the cultural life of human society according to his gifts making clear in all his doings that Jesus Christ is Lord Helmut Isaak Menno Simons and the New Jerusalem Helmut Isaak s unfinished Amsterdam doctoral dissertation has finally been published It makes clear what has long been suspected namely that contrary to Schleitheim Menno envisioned a society and even a political order completely identified and suffused with the values of the kingdom of God and the presence of the New Jerusalem A Mennonite nation

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/41/2/church-and-school-companeros-in-growing.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Training Disciples for Outreach Ministries
    student population would be enhanced by me as an international student bringing my values and experiences to the table When they went so far as to buy a flag of Germany and put it up for me in front of the Special Events center they gave more value to my life than I ever expected to discover Here I was introduced to the concept of a community of learning The seminary confronted me with the complexities of life Hans Kasdorf knew about my upbringing and my inner tensions and became an invaluable mentor Since the 1990s we were busy crossing borders and I started longing for a peaceful territory The seminary also provided me with a peer group I still bank on wherever my global ministries take me After I checked with Paul Hiebert about doing a PhD at Trinity in Chicago I resolved to let education go for at least ten years After five years of formal education in California I had to be honest enough to admit that academia had answered all questions I have ever had but that I had in the process lost sight of real life God saw it differently There was no other way for me to become a worker in Kabardino Balkaria except by enrolling in a doctoral program at the state university in Nalchik This opened more doors for ministry than anything I could think of Not by chance I saw my dean become the head of the Republic s government In this school I found the editors for our Bible translation project the Jesus film the hymnal Here I was introduced to the arts history and culture of the people group I came to reach with the Good News Here I started publishing in local journals and book series Here I learned Russian so well that for many years I was able to work on the editorial team of Russia s largest Christian magazine In this university I understood something I began to appreciate at FPC schools themselves are close to ideal places of outreach They beg to be a platform Schools do teach Schools do equip While church too frequently becomes a weekend activity where people are talked at school is a place of interaction and innovation a place to field questions and embark on an individual and collective quest for truth Jesus was also a teacher He taught with authority like no one else But at the same time he was a discipler He talked with his disciples but he also walked with them Jesus took his friends to the mount of Transfiguration Luke 9 27 36 And the disciples fooled themselves by thinking they could stay in the ivory tower and have offices next to Moses JD and Elijah ThD But Jesus did not spare them the encounter with evil at the foot of the hill Significant as the Sunday experience was the experience with the Monday crowds was just as important Looking at Jesus I realize how

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  • Direction: Transformation as Missional Goal for Our Churches and Schools
    in this ministry of transformation Transformation and the Church of History For the sake of this study we shall concentrate on four historical periods the early church the Reformation the Anabaptist movement and the Mennonite Brethren Churches in the Congo Early Church In The Rise of Christianity 1997 social scientist Rodney Stark examined the link between social transformation and the early church He found this small group of early Christians had introduced a vision of humanity to the Roman world He noted that seven principles drastically changed the Roman empire 1 Christians have a God who loves those who love him 2 the Christians God instructs those who love him to love others 3 Christians are not separated by social rank or ethnicity 4 the Christian is merciful and requires mercy 5 Christian men love their wives and themselves 6 Christians reject abortion and infanticide common practices in Rome and 7 Christians love others even those outside of their faith Thus Christianity provided a new vision of humanity which changed the Roman world even though Christians were a minority Reformation God used the church and the Protestant Reformation to transform societies in Switzerland Germany and Holland The doctrines of sola gratia sola fide sola scriptura and soli Deo gloria challenged the thoughts and practices of the Roman church of the day The church was seen as the embryo of a new world order Interestingly enough the ministry of the church was geared toward the needs of the community at large and made a significant impact in Europe which became the foundation for the development of modern civilization So as they worked to reform the church they worked hard to develop society at large The Anabaptist Movement Our movement impacted societies through revival This great movement which started in Switzerland Germany and Holland and continued later in Russia and then North and South America not only converted sinners but included an emphasis on good works that profoundly affected societies bringing social reform and launching a great missionary movement of which we today are the product The Mennonite Brethren Churches in the Congo The church planting movement that swept the city of Kinshasa in the late 1980s was launched by a group of young lay professionals who experienced transformation from the first Mennonite Brethren mission outreach They all were educated in the Mennonite schools where they were well taught how to think to do and to behave As they arrived in the city they all became professionals in various areas including education health and business As they settled in their various settings they felt the need to establish churches from their own tradition the Mennonite Brethren churches They were so keen on the vision that they used their own properties to begin these churches My own father began such a church movement As a result today there are fifty six local churches in Kinshasa which sprang up because of men and women who were transformed and wanted to serve the Lord in

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