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  • Direction: C. S. Lewis in a Time of War
    farcical x Phillips began his investigation in the summer of 1997 and died in 2000 just after finishing his book manuscript which was subsequently edited by his daughter and released in early 2006 Phillips work is really three books in one with each as interesting to this reviewer as the others Roughly eighty pages are devoted to the first two of these He begins in September 1939 with an introduction to life in Britain just preceding and during the outbreak of World War II The fear and uncertainty the preparations made for food and other essentials and the decisions made about entertainment and media make for intriguing and sobering reading Second Phillips explores the early days of religious broadcasting and the variety of philosophies which vied for its harnessing Particularly the employment of radio for news and public morale and the strategies for religion in the service of the nation come under Phillips careful scrutiny and balanced presentation Third comes the focus reflected in the book s subtitle the interaction and collaboration between Lewis and the BBC to produce the succinctly worded scripts which were later published and finally combined into one of Lewis s most popular works Mere Christianity Phillips makes clear not inappropriately that the BBC s religion directors were partly responsible for Lewis s style as well as for honing his ability to say much in a short space since they were constrained to hold him to strict time limits Part of the book s humor concerns the communication and miscommunication between Lewis and the BBC over the length of time allotted for subsequent series of talks after the success of the first And in addition to Lewis the book provides insight into the broadcasting efforts of other significant Christian writers and thinkers such as Dorothy Sayers

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/c-s-lewis-in-time-of-war.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Covenant of Peace
    theology and ethics Even the Synoptic Gospels are explored individually Consequently one finds in this book not merely one New Testament peace theology but peace theologies within the New Testament canon Swartley as one would expect does work out a synthesis in the end according to his own Anabaptist heritage and convictions Furthermore he rightly seeks to lodge his findings on peace in the New Testament against a background in Jewish literature on the one hand and against the Greco Roman sources on the other This is a worthy undertaking however daunting Above all the discussion in this book makes connection with other themes large and small including kingdom of God way of the cross love of enemy justice Sabbath healings liberation and kiss of peace Nor does his search for a peace theology within this thematic texture hinder him from dealing openly with texts in tension with his position For example he treats Jesus clearing of the temple overturning the tables etc by portraying the act as one of nonviolent resistance against evil 112 20 While his work is very much his own it could be viewed as a nuance on the work of René Girard from whom Swartley has drawn significantly What is a review without some critique A few points must suffice 1 It seems to me the book does not explain well how the good news of the kingdom in Jesus in which the enemy is loved could have at the same time made enemies that would ultimately crucify Jesus for his way I find Swartley s effort to balance Jesus love of enemy with his highly provocative stance in Jerusalem less than compelling 2 Reliance on Montefiore and Lowe s A Rabbinic Anthology among other such is scarcely a scholarly way of reading Jewish sources

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/covenant-of-peace.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Preparing Sunday Dinner: A Collaborative Approach to Worship and Preaching
    the group that produced Hymnal A Worship Book Rebecca Slough also teaches at AMBS and served as managing editor for Hymnal A Worship Book from 1989 to 1992 Preparing and serving a Sunday meal is the metaphor for preparing and leading a Sunday worship service This organizational ploy is consistently used throughout the text Because it is about worship it is directed to all those who are involved in the planning of and the leading of the worship service Planning for worship in the free church tradition includes lay leaders as well as clergy and with the increased interest in this subject many readers who do not lead worship would find the information in this book instructive as well Except for chapter 15 Epilogue each chapter heading is a reminder of elements of a Sunday dinner Each begins with a personal anecdote recalling family feasts with a prompt description of the similarity of this element of a family meal to its counterpart in the worship service Twelve appendixes giving more information in specific areas are included The three collaborators of this book work together in an institution in the free church tradition A premise with which they begin is that in that church tradition preparing the worship service is not the responsibility of only one person usually the pastor but rather is a shared responsibility by members of the congregation whose gifts and skills in this area have been discerned and recognized This collaborative work should be shared by at least three people who have skills in the areas demanded by corporate worship The question of authority in worship is addressed Source materials quoted or noted except for Scripture are mostly from the last twenty five years Most recent trends in worship styles are considered but there is a distinct

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/preparing-sunday-dinner-collaborative.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Remember the Future: The Pastoral Theology of Paul the Apostle
    leads us though key passages in Galatians Philemon Colossians and Ephesians These passages show that Israel s story in Scripture shaped Paul s thinking regarding how God s invasive grace through Christ impacts life relationships ethical decisions and life s tragedies 284 Part IV Therefore Remember the Future looks at the trajectory of Pauline faith after the founder disappears Here Elias wrestles with 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus which were written in Paul s name to carry on his legacy 478 As before the grand story of what God has done in Christ shapes not only the admonitions warnings and councils but also Paul s vision of the future Along the way Elias uncovers an ancient struggle over what would be the defining story for believers and shows how Paul negotiated the tension between participating in God s mission and maintaining church order Throughout Elias uses a narrative approach Each chapter begins with a short imaginative story about characters living within the narrative world of Paul The stories not only present the Greco Roman world of Paul but also prepare readers to engage Paul s theology in the rest of the chapter For example chapter seven begins with a story about Aegina who chooses loyalty to Christ over allegiance to the emperor persecution over patriotism As the story unfolds Elias creatively introduces a brief political history of Thessalonica a description of how Christians met in tenement houses for worship and explains why Christians aroused suspicion and opposition As each chapter unfolds Elias continues the narrative approach by drawing out the formative stories and images embedded within and assumed by Paul including those from the story of Jesus Paul s experience Israel s history and the Greco Roman world For example Elias provides convincing evidence that Paul interpreted his own

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/remember-future-pastoral-theology-of.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Evangelicalism: An Americanized Christianity
    hegemony chapter 3 yielded to rupture during the modernist fundamentalist controversy and conservatives generally withdrew from public view for the next several decades chapter 4 The final four chapters trace the ongoing resurgence of evangelical influence since World War II During the decades of the forties and fifties neoevangelical heirs of fundamentalism sharply critiqued the anti intellectual and separatist emphases of their forebears chapter 5 Evangelicals then extended their resurgence to politics by supporting born again Jimmy Carter in the 1976 presidential election and then redirected their loyalties to Ronald Reagan and the GOP in 1980 chapter 6 Shaped by the culture of consumerism they tuned their methods and message to the marketplace through both megachurches and televangelism as seeker friendly means of delivery chapter 7 Chapter 8 s treatment of evangelicalism s accommodation with American pop culture concludes Kyle s narrative He writes By the late twentieth century there existed little appreciable difference between the evangelical subculture and mainstream American culture 269 As already noted the author traces paradoxes throughout At the core of the book s argument lie both an acknowledgement of evangelicalism s dynamic qualities even as its buying into American culture is troubling Evangelicals have a hate love relationship with American culture While many view America s political and economic systems as divinely inspired they have hated what they regard as the nation s departure from these perceived biblical principles ix Other examples of paradox include evangelicals extensive influence despite their minority status among the cognitive elites their knack for adapting progressive methods in propagating an old time message and their idealization of women being at home while relying upon those same women both as activists in the movement s causes and as wage earners in families aspiring to the good life Even more telling is

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/evangelicalism-americanized-christianity.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: The Christian College: A History of Protestant Higher Education
    of an update than a revision is that the general narrative implies that the reader is living in the year in which it was first written in this case 1984 For example in chapter 5 The Response to Secularization one finds reference after reference to the early work of Jerry Falwell and Liberty College now University as well as statistics and analysis that would be much more relevant if early 2000s comparisons were included somewhere in the text Making a comparison to the role of evangelicals in American politics during the past twenty five years it would be like discussing the influence of the Moral Majority an early 1980s phenomenon without comparative analysis of later conservative Christian special interests such as the Christian Coalition prominent in the 1990s and Focus on the Family influential during the George W Bush administration The problem of disjuncture in the text is not alleviated by placing all post 1984 assessments in the new chapter On to the Twenty first Century Another distraction is the sudden addition of numerous references to Roman Catholic institutions in the added chapter On to the Twenty first Century when Roman Catholic higher education has been overlooked in most of the rest of the book This is to be sure a book on Protestant schools But if as Ringenberg notes In so many of the recent conferences and projects Protestant and Catholic educators have been working together 228 why not give more analytical attention to this very important ecumenical development Notwithstanding this critique Ringenberg s last chapter is in general a fine addition which reviews significant developments in the past twenty years including the work of the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities and the expansion of scholarly writing by faculty at Protestant institutions In this regard Ringenberg devotes two

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/christian-college-history-of-protestant.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: Current Research
    1 2006 44 58 CMU A Theology for Hopeless People in Hopeless Places The Messenger 11 January 2006 4 6 CMU Welcome to the Complex Life Christian Leader July 2006 16 18 CMU Welcome to the Complex Life Mennonite Brethren Herald 1 September 2006 8 9 CMU What Does It Mean to Be a Christian Christian Leader April 2006 16 18 CMU What Does It Really Mean to Be a Christian The Messenger 8 February 2006 4 6 CMU Guenther Bruce L Evangelicalism Within Mennonite Historiography The Decline of Anabaptism or a Path Towards Dynamic Ecumenism Journal of Mennonite Studies 24 2006 35 53 MBBS Osler Mission Chapel 1974 1994 The Convergence of Old Colony Mennonites with Evangelical Protestantism in 20th Century Canadian Society Occasional Papers Mennonite Historical Society of Saskatchewan 2006 1 37 MBBS Isaak Jon The Biblical Witness Invitation to an Alternative World A Reading Strategy for the Journey Direction 35 no 2 2006 222 34 MBBS Jost Lynn Psalm 33 America and Empire Direction 35 no 1 2006 70 81 TC Klager Andrew Passive Sacramentalism and Ontological Soteriology in Hans Denck and Gregory of Nyssa Direction 35 no 2 2006 268 78 CBC Klassen Randy Ezer and Exodus Direction 35 no 1 2006 18 32 BC Martens Elmer A Allen Guenther the Scholar Direction 35 no 1 2006 91 94 MBBS Impulses to Global Mission in Isaiah Direction 35 no 1 2006 59 69 MBBS Matties Gordon Pursuing Coherence and Conviction in Christian University Education Canadian Mennonite 23 January 2006 6 7 Also published at www christianity ca CMU Rempel Ruth Not a Cloth Giver Entitlement Hunger and Illicit Transfers on the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition 1886 1890 International Journal of African Historical Studies 38 no 3 2005 1 51 CMU Rempel Ruth Our Countless Victories Geez 2 2006 76 CMU Rogalsky Tim Blaise Pascal Mathematician Mystic Disciple Journal of the Association of Christians in the Mathematical Sciences June 2006 Also available at www acmsonline org CMU Snyder Anna Fostering Transnational Dialogue Lessons Learned from Women Peace Activists Globalizations 3 no 1 2006 31 48 CMU Stobbe Stephanie Cross Cultural Experiences of Laotian Refugees and Mennonite Sponsors in British Columbia and Manitoba Journal of Mennonite Studies 24 2006 111 128 CMU How to Deal with an Office Bully SMART Connections Magazine February 2006 12 CMU Yamasaki Gary Point of View in a Gospel Story What Difference Does It Make Luke 19 1 10 as a Test Case Journal of Biblical Literature 125 1 2006 89 105 CBC Musical Recording Boschman Nelson Unexpected CD MJCCD2005 Mennonite Jazz Committee 2005 CBC Doctoral Dissertations Bartlett Rick A Seven Strand Cord Braiding Together Leadership Development for Mid Adolescents Doctor of Ministry Leadership in the Emerging Culture Newberg Oregon George Fox University 2006 Advisor R Larry Shelton Current Position Dean of Students and Constituency Relations Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary Fresno California This project has an underlying assumption that the emerging culture will be radically different from life in the present day Given

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/36/1/current-research.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Direction: From the Editor: The Evangelical Conscience
    Imaginations New York Oxford University Press 2003 One of the striking aspects of that biblical book is that Job s friends ultimately rebuked by God for failing to speak truth as Job did say so much which is echoed elsewhere in Scripture On the other hand Job ultimately exonerated by God speaks much out of his pain and fear which he later retracts Newsom ponders how the book s gift to us develops as a process of truth discovered through conversation We dare not reject any one voice completely nor privilege any one voice above all the others all have something important to contribute I trust that this issue of Direction with Sider s book providing the opening word followed by five responses and then followed again by Sider s response might motivate continued conversation directed by God s Spirit which will lead us to greater faithful participation in our mission for Christ s kingdom David Faber assesses the arguments employed in chapter 1 concerning the depth of the scandal Jon Isaak responding to chapter 2 presents four strategies for ethical use of the Bible Harold Jantz concurs with Sider s concern about a cheap grace gospel in chapter 3 and suggests how to proceed from here John H Redekop evaluates Sider s critique of the church and its role in culture as found in chapter 4 Paul Doerksen reviewing the final chapter considers the importance of eschatology for a critique of the church These five essays are followed by Professor Sider s response and a short biography of Sider In addition Recommended Reading is devoted to a bibliography of Sider s writings which span the past forty years We are very pleased to include in this issue two essays of historical theology involving the Reformation period perhaps appropriately since

    Original URL path: http://www.directionjournal.org/35/2/editorial.html (2016-02-16)
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